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ICE increase size at Bantam Draft

by Jeff Bromley
on
Go Big or go home. That was the order
of the day for the Kootenay ICE as the
WHL held their 12th annual Bantam
Draft at the Pengrowth Saddledome in
Calgary this past Thursday. In this years
draft, held for players born in 1986 and
who will be at least one year away from
playing the WHL, there wasn’t the hype
of any one player who would
immediately set the league on fire like a
Jay Bouwmeester or a Steve McCarthy
but rather an even keel of possible talent
spread throughout the early rounds. For
the Kootenay ICE, there was a theme
set throughout the draft, size. There was
a conscious effort to increase the club’s
dimensions and even though these kids
are one or two years away from
attempting to make an impact and still
have those years in which to fill out – the
message was clear – almost to a player,
size was a factor.

Finding themselves picking eighteenth
out of nineteen WHL club’s, Director of
Player Personnel Roy Stasiuk was taken
a little off guard when still waiting at
number eighteen was Jeremy
Schenderling, a highly touted prospect
playing for the Western Canadian
Bantam Champion Langley AAA
Eagles. Consequently, the ICE
immediately made the 6’1″, 170lb
Langley product their first overall pick.
“This might sound like a bit of a cliche,
but we honestly couldn’t believe that our
first round pick, Jeremy Schenderling
from Langley was still available at
number eighteen. We had him rated in
our assessment of the Bantam Draft in
the top three, so we are extremely
pleased at landing a player of Jeremy’s
caliber, Read more »

Unkown Soldier: Christain Chartier

by pbadmin
on
With little or no fanfare from any major hockey publication this crusader has left a mark upon the Western Hockey League and his opponents. It’s interesting to note that over the last two seasons he has produced solid numbers and has the respect around the league but because he was not drafted in the first couple rounds he receives no credit from other cicles.
Underestimated and underappreciated seems to be Christians call to arms and it will be very suprising if he is not ranked in the top fifty prospects overall by the middle of next season.

Nominated for two awards this year with first being the Player of the Year in the WHL along with Justin Mapletoft and Defenseman of the Year up against Matt Kinch of the Calgary Hitmen. If Christian wins best Defenseman of the Year he along with fellow future teammate Alexie Semenov will have taken two out three leagues in the Canadian Hockey League in that respect.

If by chance Christian does come away with both awards his stock should rise as dramically as Jani Rita’s did this season after the World Junior Championships.

Canucks’ Defensemen

by Kirk Pedersen
on

A look at the young blueliners who will shape the Canucks’ backline for the coming seasons.

The Big Kahuna of all Canuck prospects, not to mention defensemen, is undoubtedly Bryan Allen. The Giant has been slowed in his development by a slew of injuries, which is unfortunate, if it weren’t for injuries, he probably would have spent the majority of ’00-’01 in Vancouver.

Another of the newcomers this season unfortunately didn’t make the NHL. Rene Vydareny, a steal in the third round of the 1999 Entry Draft, spent a lot of this season walking around Vancouver, as he could not get out of a European contract agreement, which prevented him from playing minor pro. (i.e. the AHL, IHL, UHL, whichever other leagues) Once Rene got under contract, one thought he could just step right in and put up points, but it’s good that the Canucks didn’t rush him along in his development, as he has much to learn in the minor leagues before becoming a productive NHL’er. He only had one lonely point in thirty-nine games with the Blades of the IHL, and looked out of place when he was put on the ice by coach Smyl. He is, however, only one year removed from Junior hockey. He will definitely be worth the wait for the Canucks. ETA: 2004, or late 2003.

The next young defenseman is talented, young Zenith Komarniski. He has raw ability. He hasn’t shown the Canucks all that much thus far in his pro career, although he did earn an eighteen-game call-up with the big club last season, as injuries ravaged the Canucks’ blueline. He has as much potential as any d Read more »

German Ranking of 2001 eligibles

by Oliver Janz
on

German Scouting: End-Season Rankings
Goaltenders

Rank Name (CSB-Rank)         League        Team            Birthdate   HT    WT Catches
 1   Pätzold, Dimitri (3)    Germany       Erding          03-Feb-83  6     183    L
 2   Koslow, Patrick         Germany Jr.   Mannheim Jr.    06-Jan-85  5'10  168
 3   Rohde, Christian        Germany       Augsburg        02-Okt-82  6     172    L
 4   Kotschnew, Dimitrj      Germany III   Hamburg         15-Jul-81  6     179
 5   Morczinietz, Martin     Germany Jr.   Geretsried Jr.  16-Aug-84
 6   Voigt, Benjamin         Germany II    Bietigheim      19-Mar-82  6'1   185
 7   Schnelle, Tim           Germany II    Bietigheim      02-Jan-82  5'10  186
 8   Ehelechner, Patrick     Germany IV    Mannheim II     29-Sep-84
 9   Aus den Birken, Danny   Germany Jr.   Mannheim Jr.    15-Feb-85
10   Niemz, Martin           Germany Jr.   Riessersee Jr.  30-Mar-83


German Scouting: End-Season Rankings
Forwards

Rank Name (CSB-Rank)            League       Team            Birthdate   HT    WT Pos Shot
 1   Goc, Marcel (12)           Germany      Schwenningen    23-Aug-83  6'1   187  C   L
 2   Greilinger, Thomas (70)    Germany      Schwenningen    06-Aug-81  5'11  194  RW  R
 3   Grygiel, Adrian            Germany      Krefeld         13-Sep-83  5'10  179  RW  R
 4   Hinterstocker, Martin (100)Germany II   Riessersee      01-Feb-83  6     187  LW  L
 5   Ullmann, Christoph         Germany IV   Köln II         19-May-83  6     192  C
 6   Kink, Marcus               Germany Jr.  Riessers Read more »

Lancers claim USHL’s Clark Cup

by Jason Shaner
on
The 2000-2001 season is finally over with the Omaha Lancers grabbing the Clark Cup for being the playoff champion. The Lancers defeated the Lincoln Stars, quite possibly their biggest rivals, who won the regular season title and claimed the Anderson Cup. In getting to the final series Omaha ripped the Des Moines Buccaneers in a 3 game sweep of their best of 5 series. All series this season were 5 games. Omaha then handed the Sioux Falls Stampede their lumps beating them in 4 games. Lincoln also went through the playoffs with relative ease sweeping the Sioux City Musketeers and the Tri-City Storm en route to the Clark Cup finals. Then came the finals.

Omaha and Lincoln played a series that will be remembered for years as one of the best finals in USHL history. Lincoln, defending their home ice in game 1 won 6-1. In game 2 Omaha proved they could defend their turf too handing the Stars a 6-2 loss. Although the scores were pretty one sided, the games were not. Every game in this series was played with ferocity that could not be matched during the regular season. Game 3 saw the games get even tighter as Lincoln was victorious at home 4-3. With the Lancers season on the brink of ending they went home to Ak-Sar-Ben Arena and fought hard to win 4-3 to set the stage for the 5th and deciding game in the series. In Lincoln, most felt the Stars would take the Cup as they had only lost 1 game at home during both the Regular season and Playoffs. But as we know, when it is playoff hockey time, the home ice advantage really doesn’t make a difference. The L Read more »

Habs’ Prospects Improving

by Chris Boucher
on
When trying to determine whether a player will develop NHL calibre skills, we tend to look at how that player is improving year to year. A prospect is just that; a prospect. Only by improving year to year will any player develop the skills necessary to produce at the NHL level. Skating, speed and strength are difficult attributes to measure on a year to year basis. They are far less tangible than raw stats, but in no way less important. The easiest way to measure a player’s improvement is by breaking down their production into a point per game basis. Then comparing that number to the previous year’s total.

When comparing The Montreal Canadiens’ prospects’ point per game totals from this season with those of 1999-2000, Johan Eneqvist shows the greatest improvement. The young Swede was chosen with one of the Canadiens’ 4th round picks, 109th overall in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft. The 6’0″, 183 lbs. center averaged 0.64 PPG during the 99-00 season. Through 21 games this season he averaged an incredible 1.62 PPG; an improvement of 0.98. Canadiens’ fans will be keeping a close eye on Eneqvist’s progression next season.

A close second to Eneqvist is Chicoutimi’s Christian Larrivée. Chosen in the 4th round of the 2000 NHL Entry Draft, Larrivée scored more goals this year than he did points during the entire 99-00 season. The 6’3′, 195 Lbs. center averaged only 0.33 PPG in 99-00. Through 72 games this season He averaged 1.11 PPG; a solid improvement of 0.78 PPG. Larrivée must however, improve his defensive game. He finished 99-00 with an ugly Read more »

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