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OHL Finals Preview

by Brad Coccimiglio
on
The Memorial Cup is just around the corner and the OHL champion will soon be decided. For the second year in a row the Plymouth Whalers will fight for an opportunity to represent the OHL in the tournament while the Ottawa 67’s will look to make their second appearance in 3 years in the prestigious tournament.

Before we start anything here’s a look at the schedule for the series:

Date		Home		Visitors
Sat. May 5		Plymouth		Ottawa
Sun. May 6		Plymouth		Ottawa
Thurs. May 10	Ottawa		Plymouth
Fri. May 11	Ottawa		Plymouth
Sun. May 13	Plymouth		Ottawa
Tues. May 15	Ottawa		Plymouth
Wed. May 16	Plymouth		Ottawa
Now that that’s settled let’s break down the match-up:


OFFENCE:
Both teams feature a number of high scoring players that can break open a game at any time. Ottawa features defenceman Jon Zion and forward Joe Talbot while the Whalers counter with the likes of Damian Surma, Stephen Weiss and Kris Vernarsky. With those types of players on each side there should be no shortage of offence for this series.


ADVANTAGE:
None


DEFENCE:
Plymouth’s defensive corps were bolstered when the Whalers added Ryan O’Keefe from Barrie. This will be O’Keefe’s second straight appearance in the finals. The Whalers also boast NHL draft prospect Cole Jarrett and Libor Ustrnul. On the Ottawa side Jonathan Zion is always a threat.


ADVANTAGE:
Plymouth


GOALTENDING:
The Whalers are backstopped by two time OHL goaltender of the year runner-up Rob Zepp. Zepp had a solid season and backu Read more »

Defenseman of the Year in the OHL

by pbadmin
on
It may seem like one small step for Alexei Semenov of the Sudbury Wolves by moving up from Defensive Defenseman of the year in 1999-2000 and taking the top prize this season but nothing is small when your 6’6″.
A tower of power on defense this season he seems eager to bring on the challenges the next level will bring him. His well rounded play and shear dominance over his opponants in his own zone made the decision by the General Managers of the Ontario Hockey League to give him this award easy.

However the voting was close with the top three vote getters with 54-46-32 points respectivly. The trio was quite impressive considering he beat out Rostislav Klesla whom was drafted by the Columbus Blue Jackets 4th overall last year, rounding out the top three was Jon Zion whom plays for the Ottawa 67’s. It may turn out that Alexei a second round pick of Edmonton’s in 1999 may end up being the steal of the draft.

Some of the past winners read like an All Star ballot with Dennis Potvin winning two years in a row back in 71-72 and 72-73. With most receintly the additions of Al MacInnis in 82-83, Chris Pronger in 92-93 and retired Bryan Berard with a double as well in 94-95 and 95-96. If the progression continues he may one day in the distant future be considered on par with some of the names mentioned above.

Canucks’ forwards

by Kirk Pedersen
on

The Canucks’ youngsters at forward are a bunch of young stallions, some of which will be put out to stud in trade offers, but others, will shine through, still others, will probably, sadly, never make it to the NHL.

The top Canucks forward prospect is none other than big Russian centre Artem Chubarov. He will be a very good NHL’er, once he can shake that injury bug. He still needs a bit of seasoning at the minor league level. He needs one full season at Manitoba this upcoming year, then in 2002-03, he should start making his big step towards the two-way prowess which originally attracted the Canucks to him. He has been a point-a-game man in the minors, in only a small amount of games, but he has gotten a point per game average. Maybe he can get on a streak in Manitoba next season, and be one of the first Canuck call-ups in 2001-02.

The Canuck prospect with the most offensive talent, is arguably Brandon Reid. Getting him so late in the 2000 Draft has proven to be an outright steal for Burke. He should spend at least one year with Manitoba in the IHL, helping him get acclimated to pro hockey slowly, not rushing his development, and hopefully his offensive talent could carry over. If he was a few inches taller, he would have been a first-rounder in the 2000 Draft. He also played very well for the Canadian squad at the 2000 World Junior Championships, getting a point a game for the Bronze medal-winning Canadians.

Jarkko Ruutu. Ruutu is constantly all over the ice, throwing big hits, agitating players, drawing penalties, scori Read more »

ICE increase size at Bantam Draft

by Jeff Bromley
on
Go Big or go home. That was the order
of the day for the Kootenay ICE as the
WHL held their 12th annual Bantam
Draft at the Pengrowth Saddledome in
Calgary this past Thursday. In this years
draft, held for players born in 1986 and
who will be at least one year away from
playing the WHL, there wasn’t the hype
of any one player who would
immediately set the league on fire like a
Jay Bouwmeester or a Steve McCarthy
but rather an even keel of possible talent
spread throughout the early rounds. For
the Kootenay ICE, there was a theme
set throughout the draft, size. There was
a conscious effort to increase the club’s
dimensions and even though these kids
are one or two years away from
attempting to make an impact and still
have those years in which to fill out – the
message was clear – almost to a player,
size was a factor.

Finding themselves picking eighteenth
out of nineteen WHL club’s, Director of
Player Personnel Roy Stasiuk was taken
a little off guard when still waiting at
number eighteen was Jeremy
Schenderling, a highly touted prospect
playing for the Western Canadian
Bantam Champion Langley AAA
Eagles. Consequently, the ICE
immediately made the 6’1″, 170lb
Langley product their first overall pick.
“This might sound like a bit of a cliche,
but we honestly couldn’t believe that our
first round pick, Jeremy Schenderling
from Langley was still available at
number eighteen. We had him rated in
our assessment of the Bantam Draft in
the top three, so we are extremely
pleased at landing a player of Jeremy’s
caliber, Read more »

Unkown Soldier: Christain Chartier

by pbadmin
on
With little or no fanfare from any major hockey publication this crusader has left a mark upon the Western Hockey League and his opponents. It’s interesting to note that over the last two seasons he has produced solid numbers and has the respect around the league but because he was not drafted in the first couple rounds he receives no credit from other cicles.
Underestimated and underappreciated seems to be Christians call to arms and it will be very suprising if he is not ranked in the top fifty prospects overall by the middle of next season.

Nominated for two awards this year with first being the Player of the Year in the WHL along with Justin Mapletoft and Defenseman of the Year up against Matt Kinch of the Calgary Hitmen. If Christian wins best Defenseman of the Year he along with fellow future teammate Alexie Semenov will have taken two out three leagues in the Canadian Hockey League in that respect.

If by chance Christian does come away with both awards his stock should rise as dramically as Jani Rita’s did this season after the World Junior Championships.

Canucks’ Defensemen

by Kirk Pedersen
on

A look at the young blueliners who will shape the Canucks’ backline for the coming seasons.

The Big Kahuna of all Canuck prospects, not to mention defensemen, is undoubtedly Bryan Allen. The Giant has been slowed in his development by a slew of injuries, which is unfortunate, if it weren’t for injuries, he probably would have spent the majority of ’00-’01 in Vancouver.

Another of the newcomers this season unfortunately didn’t make the NHL. Rene Vydareny, a steal in the third round of the 1999 Entry Draft, spent a lot of this season walking around Vancouver, as he could not get out of a European contract agreement, which prevented him from playing minor pro. (i.e. the AHL, IHL, UHL, whichever other leagues) Once Rene got under contract, one thought he could just step right in and put up points, but it’s good that the Canucks didn’t rush him along in his development, as he has much to learn in the minor leagues before becoming a productive NHL’er. He only had one lonely point in thirty-nine games with the Blades of the IHL, and looked out of place when he was put on the ice by coach Smyl. He is, however, only one year removed from Junior hockey. He will definitely be worth the wait for the Canucks. ETA: 2004, or late 2003.

The next young defenseman is talented, young Zenith Komarniski. He has raw ability. He hasn’t shown the Canucks all that much thus far in his pro career, although he did earn an eighteen-game call-up with the big club last season, as injuries ravaged the Canucks’ blueline. He has as much potential as any d Read more »

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