View Archives:
  • News & Features

Lukin leads Canada at U-18 World Cup

by Jeff Arnim
on

Kamloops Blazer forward Jarret Lukin scored two goals for Team Canada, including the game winner, en route to the squad’s 5-0 shutout over Slovakia in the first official game of the 2001 Six Nations Tournament in Kolin, Czech Republic. Pierre-Marc Bouchard (Chicoutimi, QMJHL), Maxime Talbot (Hull, QMJHL), and Ben Eager (Oshawa, OHL) also tallied for Canada on Monday.

Lukin, a 5-foot-9 and 170 pound native of Fort McMurray, Alberta, played his first full season in the Western Hockey League last year as a 16-year-old, posting 11 goals and 18 points in 61 games for Kamloops, along with 43 penalty minutes. He also appeared in all four Blazer playoff games.

Brandon Wheat Kings winger Lance Monych also added an assist on Lukin’s second goal, at 12:04 of the third period.

In addition to Lukin and Monych, four WHL players, all defensemen, are a part of the Canadian National Under-18 team. They include Tyler Boldt (Kamloops), Derek Meech (Red Deer), Andy Thompson (Kootenay), and Ian White (Swift Current).

The next action for the team is Tuesday against the host Czech Republic squad.

Player vitals: Jarret Lukin
Position: Center
Height: 5-9
Weight: 170 lbs.
Birthdate: 1/24/84
Hometown: Fort McMurray, AB

Read more »

New Coyotes’ Top 20

by Brandon LeBourveau
on
Conducting a Top 20 list of prospects is not an easy thing to do. Everyone has their own opinion on a certain player’s talent and potential, and if you ask 5 people to give you a Top 20 list, I’m willing to bet all 5 would be different. I know not everyone is going to agree with this list, and I respect that. I respect your opinion, and if you feel like expressing it in an e-mail or a comment at the bottom of this article, please feel to do so. I will try to reply to all comments. Well, enough of the gibberish, let’s get right to it: The List.

Read more »

Cipolla Heads North to Winnipeg

by Andrew Bourgeois
on

AHL NEWS

Manitoba Moose have announced that they have purchased the contract of LW/C Jason Cipolla from the Rochester Americans. Cipolla spent the past two seasons with the Amerks but Moose fans may remember him from his two years as a member of the Milwaukee Admirals, where he recorded 111 points in 129 games between 1997 and 1999. Cipolla is the fourth player acquired by the Moose this season, joining defensemen Brian Chapman and Justin Kurtz, along with forward Jimmy Roy.

The Toronto product posted totals of 12 goals and 25 assists for 37 points in 72 games with the Americans last season. He signed with Rochester prior to the 1999-2000 season and was part of the Amerks’ run to the Calder Cup final. Cipolla is known as an individual with good character. On the ice he is feisty and agressive. Off the ice, he was awarded the Americans’ McCulloch Trophy for his work in the community last season.

“Jason Cipolla is a hardworking player that will show up every night,” said Carlyle. “When Vancouver goes through a string of recalls over the course of the season he will be one of the players that we will depend on as a constant variable along with players like Brian Chapman, Justin Kurtz and Jimmy Roy. We expect that he will be able to contribute offensively and will be a positive influence in the dressing room.”

Cipolla will join all the Canucks hopefuls in Burnaby, B.C. when Vancouver opens their training camp on September 11th.

AHL FASTFACTS

In 1996-97 Hamilton Bulldogs Dennis Bonvie set an AHL record when he recorded 522 penalty Read more »

2001-02 Season Previews, From Vydareny to Reid.

by Kirk Pedersen
on

The Canucks have been a team in the past who have gotten quite a bit of high-quality talent from the NHL Draft. The past few seasons have been no exception. Since Brian Burke and his band of merry men took over in 1998, the Canucks have seen players such as Artem Chubarov and the Sedins take roles in the future of this franchise. With players such as Bryan Allen, Rene Vydareny and Brandon Reid set to undertake spots in the hopefully not-too-distant future.

Here are prospects #3-6, a preview and forecast of the upcoming seasons for Rene Vydareny, Alexander Auld, R.J. Umberger, and speedster Brandon Reid.

Rene Vydareny was drafted in 1999, in the third round, from Bratislava, in the Slovakian Junior league. He was the #12 European skater for the ’99 draft, ahead of such players as Luca Cereda, Kristian Kudroc, Andrei Shefer, and Mattias Weinhandl. He came over to North America for the 1999-2000 season, picking up thirty points (7g, 23a) in 51 games with the Rimouski Oceanic of the QMJHL.

He missed a good chunk of this season due to a contract dispute with his Slovakian Club team, which blew up into him not being able to play in Kansas City, or with the Canucks, as stipulated in his contract. The Canucks spent the better part of a few weeks trying to wrestle the rights to Rene away from Bratislava, and eventually succeeded, although they paid an undisclosed sum to the Slovakian team for Rene’s services. He finally arrived in Kansas City, around the midpoint of the final season for the IHL. He didn’t score at all; (0g,1a in 39 games) but he showed flas Read more »

Tim Branham

by Scott McFarlane
on

When the Vancouver Canucks selected Tim Branham with their 3rd pick (93rd overall) in the 2000 NHL entry draft, the Canucks knew that they were drafting a solid, talented defensemen.

Tim Branham

Position: D

Shoots: Left

Height: 6-2

Weight: 185 lbs

Birthdate: 1981-05-05

Hometown: Eagle River, Wisconsin

The 6’2, 185-pound Branham is known more as an offensive defenseman, rather than the typical defensive defensemen. Tim Branham’s skating is one of his more notable skills, along with his big shot. Branham will have more of a realistic chance to make the Canucks within the next 4 years.

The Canucks are deep on defence, with Bryan Allen, Zenith Komarniski and Rene Vydarney all ready to make the next step to the NHL. It leaves very little room for Tim Branham and other defensemen prospects like Bonni, Hay, and Ytfeld to make the team. There are hardly any open spots on the Vancouver Canucks for the next couple years. So many players are trying out for those few spots, only so many can earn those spots. It is going to be tough for the players, but fun for us writers and fans to watch.

Last year Branham played for the Barrie Colts of the OHL.

Tim Branham’s stats

1999-00 Barrie Colts OHL GP 38 G 3 A 16 P 19 PIM 46

2000-01 Barrie Colts OHL GP 68 G 7 A 25 P 32 PIM 77

Tim Branham posted very respectable numbers last season. A nice stat to see was the 77 penalty minutes in 68 games; this shows that he can throw his tall, skinny frame around and doesn’ Read more »

Fulfilling the league’s potential.

by Jake Dole
on
Since 1946, hockey has taken over as the sort of competition which, to this day, familiarizes other nations with Russia and its system of sporting procedure. Until the fall of the Soviet Union, the system was extremely successful(although somewhat inhumane), which was evident with the enjoyed success of the “Sbornaja” clubs for more than 3 decades. Although, the system had its flaws, the secret lay within the strict development of youth to ensure the country’s athletic prosperity and assure consequent triumphs.
With the upcoming winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah, one can only wonder if the nation can realistically compete for gold. Whether or not the problem lies within the apparent shortage of hockey youth, an argument can be made that unlike in the late 80’s or early 90s, Russia can no longer exhibit a punch of youthful energy to its lineup. Ten years ago, the likes of Mogilny, Bure and Fedorov represented the core of the country’s hockey prosperity. However, in 2001 the country is faced with putting together a team either with the millionaire stars who don’t want to be there or with the unproven youngsters who…well, have yet to prove anything. The lackluster development of hockey posterity in the 90’s has resulted in numerous disappointing world championship results for Russia, a tournament which was supposed to showcase more of the country’s budding youth. Although there has been clear improvement with an increase, let alone, the proportion of talent, many problems still plague the junior hockey systems in Russia.
A key problem Read more »

The Flyers can fly high with Jiri Dopita

by Robert Neuhauser
on
We’ll probably not exactly find out which reason forced Jiri Dopita, arguably the best forward
outside the NHL, to try his luck on the other side of the pond. But one thing is for sure.
After refusing offers from the Boston Bruins, New York Islanders and lastly the Florida
Panthers, Jiri joins former Vsetin teammate Roman Cechmanek in Philadelphia. Jiri Dopita,
nicknamed Dopi (read Dopey) will celebrate his 33rd birthday in December and this native
from Sumperk, Czech Republic can’t be labelled as one who is entering his prime. But he can
provide immediate help and boost the Flyers offense for the next 4-5 years.

Jiri started to play hockey and handball in his native Sumperk in mid-70’s. It was soon clear
that this guy has a very good hockey sense and talent and Jiri stayed in Sumperk only till
he was ready to play in the elite junior league. HC Olomouc has brought him into the system, but
he didn’t make his Czechoslovakian 1. liga (elite league at that time) debut in Olomouc jersey. He
had to enter the army for two years and he played in his debut among the seniors for the army
team HC Dukla Jihlava. That was in the 1989-90 season. Jiri split the two army years between
HC Dukla Jihlava and VTJ Tabor and returned to Olomouc as the 1992-93 seeason passed the
halfway mark.

Jiri Dopita was originally a Boston Bruins’ draft choice back in 1992, 132nd overall. At one time
it seemed that Jiri will accept their offer and fight for a roster spot with the Bruins, but
finally Jiri refused the Bruins offer and chose to play for Eisbaren Berlin (Berlin Ic Read more »

Fantasy Hockey: Centers 2001-2002

by Drew Bennett
on

1. Peter Forsberg- (Avalanche) While missing around 10 games last year
due to injuries, Forsberg still managed to put up very good numbers (62
assists, 89 points). An injury-free year could mean a career year for
Forsberg, who could possibly win the scoring title.

2. Mario Lemieux- (Penguins) After coming out of retirement last season
to help the struggling Penguins, Lemieux jump started the Penguins and
led them to the playoffs. The talented Lemieux will put up points, but
he will take games off to rest and might miss the absence of one of the
world’s most talented players, Jaromir Jagr, more than he might think.

3. Joe Sakic- (Avalanche) The league’s Most Valuable Player last season
showed no signs of slowing down. If Sakic can stay healthy he
could once again challenge for the scoring title. With the help of the
high-powered Avalanche offence Sakic should have a 50 goal 50 assist
season.

4. Doug Weight- (Blues) Weight, who was traded to the Blues during the
summer, will find joy in playing with Keith Tckchuk and Pavol Demitra.
A change of scenery was something that Weight needed, and he could have
a 90-point season, but only 25 of those points being goals.

5. Jason Allison- (Bruins) Allison, who had a career year last year,
will probably not be in Boston by season’s start. After a 95-point
season last year, there are not many reasons why he should not repeat
that total, besides the fact that he might be playing on a weak team or
holding-out. Allison could finish the season in th Read more »

Hockey’s Future profiles Stephen Weiss

by Mark Fischel
on

Of all the players drafted this year, Stephen Weiss might have been the most complete and well-rounded of the top players. Blessed with natural offensive instincts and a solid scoring touch around the net, Stephen makes his teammates better due to his unselfish play and very good hockey sense. Former Whalers Asst. Coach Steve Spott on his star center “Stephen Competes very hard, He doesn’t put himself in awkward positions on the ice, he is very intelligent that way.” To go with the natural instincts, Weiss is an effortless skater with excellent speed, acceleration and can outskate and outplay his opponents in one-on-one situations.

Stephen’s smaller stature might have been the only thing keeping him back from going higher in the draft, but Stephen doesn’t let his average size hold him back in all ends of the ice “The offensive Stuff is god-given, and he (Stephen) can do that anyways, but he has made a conscious decision to play well defensively, and that is why he is such a complete player.” This effort to play in all zones and be considered a threat whenever he is on the ice, is what made Stephen stand out to the Panthers as well. Stephen is a good fore-checker and will put the team ahead of personal statistics.

While he excelled in the OHL in faceoffs, it becomes a different skill altogether in the NHL, According to Steve Spott “In junior hockey, sometimes, you get in a habit where the importance of faceoffs aren’t stressed enough. That is something he will have to continue to work on and technically he is very good, but along with his s Read more »

Related Articles

Win a PlayStation 4 + a copy of NHL 16 from GameRevolution and Hockey's Future! Complete one or more of the action... in Contests on LockerDome