Adam Courchaine
www.theahl.com

Adam Courchaine

Hometown:

Kanata Ontario

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-02-20

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Right

Drafted:

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

Free agent signing, 2007

Weight:

181 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2006-07: Played for the Orleans Blues of the CJHL, a junior A level league in Canada. He posted a 19-11-5-2 record in 39 appearances, 3.12 GAA and .921 dave percentage. Courchaine had one shutout on the season, a 4-0 win over the Brockville Braves in February 2007, where he stopped 37 shots.The Blues finished second in their division and went on to have a brief 6 game run in the playoffs. Courchaine appeared in all six games, picking up a 2-2-2 record, 2.58 GAA and .921 save percentage.

Ottawa 67's (OHL) acquired rights to Courchaine from Barrie Colts in January 2007

Invited to Boston Bruins 2007 training camp; signed three-year contract with Bruins in Sept 2007

2007-08: Played his rookie season with Ottawa and made the majority of starts. He earned two shutouts; one on December 16th vs. Mississauga, and the other on December 30th vs. Erie. He joined the Providence Bruins (AHL) on an ATO following the close of the season. 

2008-09: The early-season groin injury that kept Courchaine from Bruins camp also kept him from securing the starting goalie role this season. He started 17 fewer games than he did last year and saw his save percentage drop below .900.  Consistency was a struggle, especially during February when he went 1-3 in six appearances with a 5.49 goals-against average and .841 save percentage. At times, his butterfly style revealed a tendency to go down early and get beat high. At other times, he was prone to giving up dangerous rebounds. He managed to finish the season with a 13-11-2 record and 3.28 goals against average. Confidence and consistency were better throughout the playoffs. He finished 2-2-1 with a 3.00 goals against average and a .920 save percentage that included one shutout. Ottawa lost to Niagara Falls in overtime of game 7 for a first-round defeat, despite 45 saves from Courchaine.

2009-10: Courchaine split time between two OHL clubs this season, playing for the Sarnia Sting and Erie Otters.  In 27 games for the Sting, Courchaine compiled a record of 8-16-1-1 while posting a 3.51 goals-against average and a .899 save percentage.  Courchaine was traded to the Otters, where he played in 21 games.  His record with that club was 12-8-0-0, with a 2.90 goals-against average and a .913 save percentage.  Courchaine was on the losing end of 2 playoff contests, where he registered a 4.50 goals-against average and a .886 save percentage.

2010-11: Courchaine spent his first season in pro hockey with the Kelly Cup champion Alaska Aces backing up one-time Lightning product Gerald Coleman. In 28 games with the Aces, Courchaine was 17-7 with 2 overtime losses and 4 shutouts in 28 games. He posted an impressive 2.39 GAA and .907 save percentage for the Aces. Courchaine appeared in one playoff game for the Aces and stopped 35 of 37 shots to get the win. The successful season erased any memory of his forgettable ECHL debut – an October game with the Reading Royals in which he allowed 4 goals on 9 shots in seven minutes of action against Trenton; his lone appearance for the Royals.

Talent Analysis

A butterfly style goaltender, Courchaine stays square with the shooter and is quick to react. He has the ability to remain calm and focused during tough games, even when he is bombarded with shots. More often than not, he will come up with the big save.

Future

Helped Alaska win a championship last season, but will still have a hard time making the Providence squad. Expect him to play for Reading of the ECHL this season.

Devils Draft Preview

by Jared Ramsden
on

The Devils have a well earned reputation for being one of the most successful drafting teams in the NHL. And at this weekend’s Entry Draft form Sunrise, Florida, General Manager Lou Lamoriello and Head Scout David Conte will look to carry on the success.

Since 1990′s draft, 47 of New Jersey’s drafted players have gone on to play at least one NHL game, which is best in the league along with Colorado and NYI. Last year alone, the Devils had 9 of their own drafted players on their roster and 6 others who spent some time up with the Devils as well. The 9 players were: Martin Brodeur (’90,1/20) Ken Daneyko (’82,1/18) Scott Niedermayer (’91,1/3) Colin White (’96,2/49) Scott Gomez (’98,1/27) Patrik Elias (’94,2/51) Petr Sykora (’95,1/18) Sergei Brylin (’92,2/42) and Jay Pandolfo (’93,2/32). The other 6 were: Mike Commodore (’99,2/42) Sascha Goc (’97,/159) Pierre Dagenais (’98,4/105) Jiri Bicek (’97,5/131) Stan Gron (’97,2/38) and Mike Jefferson (’00,5/135). They have plenty of other notable draftees of theirs around the league like Brendan Shanahan (’87,1/2) Bill Guerin (’89,1/5) Steve Sullivan (’94,9/233) Jason Smith (’92,1/18) and Brian Rolston (’91,1/11). That is proof of how well the Devils have been able to use the draft to stock their team. They can find players high or low and can always seem to find the diamond in the rough or sleepers that other teams pass over.

Like last year, New Jersey has a huge chunk of their picks is the first half of the draft including 5 in the third round. They have an overall total of 12. As of right now, the Devils picks are Read more»

Coyotes trade for Markov

by Brandon LeBourveau
on

The Coyotes have been very busy trading. Starting with the first deal, the Coyotes dealt holdout center Robert Reichel, along with Travis Green and minor leaguer Craig Mills to the Toronto Maple Leafs for young defenseman Danny Markov. Markov is a solid two-way defenseman with good offensive instincts. He should play a big role for the Coyotes this upcoming season and in the future as well.

The second deal saw the Coyotes deal center Juha Ylonen to the Tampa Bay Lightning for Todd Warriner. Not much to talk about here as this was clearly a 3rd liner for 3rd liner type deal. The Coyotes needed wingers badly so making this deal helped them out.

Today the team announced that they have traded veteran defenseman Keith Carney to the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in return for the 41st overall pick in the 2001 Entry Draft. With the addition of Markov, plus the solid group of young defenseman such as Paul Mara, Ossi Vaananen, Kiril Safranov and Radoslav Suchy, trading away Keith Carney was a move to reduce the payroll while improving for the future and also giving some playing time to the youngsters on defense. Teppo Numminen will be the backbone of the Coyotes defense this season and he will be looked upon by the youngsters for leadership, unless he is dealt this off-season, which has been rumored.

Today the Coyotes also signed Unrestricted Free Agent Branko Radivojevic. Radivojevic, 20, is a 6’0 186-pound right winger who played three seasons with the Belleville Bulls of the OHL. He was drafted in the 3rd round (93rd overall) of the 1999 Entry Draft by the Colorado Aval Read more»

Pittsburgh Penguins Draft Preview

by Erik Johnson
on

It’s possible that the 2001 draft could be the start of a new era for the Pens (along with the continuation of an “old” era). It’s likely that the Pens will part with 4 time scoring camp and 2 time Cup winner Jaromir Jagr this summer and it’s possible that could come before (or during) the draft. In any event, the Pens will need to find that groups of prospect that will lead them to as successful of a decade as the one that just past. It won’t be easy for GM Craig Patrick, but he’s dealth with adversity well before and there is no reason to believe that he won’t make a successful post-Jagr transition.


Pens Draft Strategy

As with most teams, the Pens will draft the best player on the board in the first round, as their usual philosphy. The Pens draft table is a democracy, with GM Patrick and head scout Greg Malone at the head of that table. European scout Mark Kelly has a lot of influence in the decision making process and the Pens picks usually reflect that.


Recent Draft History

Last year was one of the few times in Patrick’s tenure that the Pens spent their first round pick on a North American born player. 4 of the 5 previous picks were used to select skilled European forwards. After the first round, the Pens generally select players to fill specific needs, all with a general theme. In 1997, the Pens spent 6 of their final 8 picks on defensemen. In 1998, 6 of 9 were forwards. 199 was a bit of a mix of players. They added depth to a number of positions. And finally last year, they spent most of their picks on tough gritt Read more»

AHL Announces 2001-2002 Alignment

by Corine Gatti
on

The realignment includes three divisions in each of the two conferences. The
2001-2002 AHL alignment is as follows:

Western Conference

West Central South Chicago Cincinnati *Hershey Grand Rapids Cleveland Norfolk Houston Rochester *Philadelphia Milwaukee Syracuse *Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Utah

Eastern Conference

East North Canadian Albany Lowell Hamilton Bridgeport Manchester Manitoba Hartford Portland Quebec Providence Worcester Saint John Springfield St. John’s

“We are very excited about the new alignment,” stated Norfolk Admirals
owner Mark Garcea. “The Admirals played some of their most memorable games
against these teams last season, including the playoff series against
Hershey. Our fans should see big rivalries continue against the new division
foes all season long.”

Last season, all four teams in the new South Division were in the AHL’s
Western Conference. Norfolk was in the Southern Division, while Hershey,
Philadelphia and Wilkes-Barre/Scranton were all in the Mid-Atlantic
Division. The Admirals faced each of the three teams eight times during the
regular season, the most games against any teams outside of their division.
The new South Division teams are those closest to Norfolk geographically.

The realignment places five of the expansion teams from the former
International Hockey League (IHL) in the Western Conference’s West Division,
with the sixth former IHL club, Manitoba, joining the Eastern Confer Read more»

2001 Panthers Draft Preview

by Jes Golbez
on
After a disasterous season, the Florida Panthers find themselves in a very
enviable position: 4 picks in the Top 50, and the draft in their home court.
With the 2001 NHL Entry Draft considered to be the strongest in some time,
the Florida Panthers have the chance to stock their bare cupboards with some
blue-chip talent, and possibly bring in some older talent to help them compete
in the near future. As with any bottom-feeder squad, there are many gaping holes
to be filled. First, a look at the essentials.

Draft Tendencies:

The Panthers have had a love affair with the CHL, especially the OHL and WHL.
Of the 6 First Round picks the Panthers have had, 4 of them have been from the CHL.
26 of the past 36 Panthers picks have been from the CHL, with many of them being ‘safe’
‘character’ players that have amounted to absolutely nothing.
The Panthers have been deathly afraid of college players (DiPenta is the only
college pick of note), and have not ventured often into Europe, including just three picks
from the Czech Republic and ZERO picks from Slovakia.
This one-dimensional approach to drafting has led to predictable results, and it shows
in the standings, and on the farm. When the Panthers have ventured into uncharted waters
(Europe), they have had good success. Radek Dvorak, Filip Kuba, Oleg Kvasha, Kristian Huselius,
Jaro Spacek, Niklas Hagman, Marcus Nilson and Vladimir Saphozhnikov have all been very good
picks, and since the Panthers have only picked twelve European players since 1995, they have had
a Read more»

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