Adam Janosik

Hometown:

Spiska Nova Ves Slovakia

Currently Playing In:

Europe

Birthday:

1992-09-07

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2010

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2010

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

3rd round (72nd overall), 2010

Weight:

170 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2007-08: Janosik scored 4 goals with 15 assists and had 38 PIM in 42 games for HC Liberec in the U-18 Czech Junior League.

2008-09: Janosik split the season between HC Liberec's U-18 and U-20 teams in Czech juniors. He scored 1 goal with 8 assists and 12 PIM in 22 games for the U-20 squad and scored 7 goals with 19 assists and 39 PIM in 20 games at the U-18 level. Janosik represented Slovakia in the WJC U-18 tournament; scoring 1 goal with 4 assists and 2 PIM in six games as Slovakia finished seventh in the ten-team tournament. Janosik was selected in the first round (46th overall) by Gatineau Olympiques in the 2009 CHL Import Draft.

2009-10: Janosik fit in well with Gatineau in his first year of North American junior hockey. He was the second-leading scorer among Gatineau defensemen with 9 goals and 26 assists and his +14 plus/minus rating was only one point less than Olympiques' leading scorer Tye McGinn's +15. Gatineau finished third in the Western Division and defeated Montreal in seven games in the first round of playoff before falling to eventual league runner-up Saint John in four straight in the second round. Janosik scored 5 goals (four on the power play), with 2 assists and was -6 with 4 PIM. He suffered a concussion in Game Three vs. Saint John and didn't play in the final game.

2010-11: Janosik skated in 60 of 68 games for the Gatineau Olympiques in his second year with the club and represented Slovakia at the 2011 U20 World Junior Championship. Janosik scored 7 goals with 25 assists and was +17 with 37 PMs on a Gatineau team that finished third in the competitive West Division before advancing to the QMJHL's playoff finals. He was -3 in 24 playoff games with 5 goals, 4 assists and 12 PMs. Janosik led eighth-place Slovakia with five assists in six games and was +1 with 2 PMs.
 
 

Talent Analysis

Janosik is a thin, young player whose game is predicated on skating, moving the puck and creating scoring opportunities for players around him. He relies on his speed, quickness and hockey sense to compensate for a lack of bulk and strength. He can be overpowered physically at times due to his size and lack of physical development but anticipates well to keep himself out of one-on-one situations. Janosik's defensive play and positioning are sometimes erratic. Janosik should improve the velocity of his shot and his ability to stick handle in tight spaces as he adds muscle and strength to his frame. Currently lacking in physical and technical skills, Janosik is a prospect because of his offensive instincts, creativity, and willingness to attack.

Future

Janosik will return to Gatineau for his second season of junior hockey following Tampa Bay's training camp. Still very raw in terms of physical development and positional play, he has the potential to be a puck-moving defenseman who is at his best in transitional play at the NHL level. Coaches will tell you that it's easier to teach the defensive side of the game and develop strength than to develop playmaking players who are able to execute and make decisions at high speed. Janosik has the ability to do the latter.

Eric Belanger- 2 Way to the NHL

by Tony Calfo
on
For many Kings fans in Southern California, Eric Belanger was just a prospect that people heard about from the local drivetime radio guy. Belanger was the answer to any question about the Kings farm system, even after injuries put his future as a King in doubt. Now, as the Kings have shown some life in the playoffs, Belanger is listed among the reasons for the Kings resurgence.

Eric Belanger was thought to be the playmaking center that the Kings wished for. He was a point-a-game plus as a junior and his skill was talked as he rose through the Kings farm system. Then a series of bizarre injuries and illnesses caused many to consider his slight build (6’0, 177) and his bad luck a precursor to a lack of durability. When Belanger finally resurfaced in Lowell last season his start was unspectacular at best. As Belanger got back into playing shape and his injuries were healed, he showed a new side of his game- a side that would take him to the NHL.

In camp last fall, the Kings saw the new Eric Belanger. Not the playmaking center but rather a hard-nosed, two-way center who could handle the puck and even deliver checks. Belanger’s versatility got a quick workout. In a one-month period, he was the Kings first line center, Lowell’s second line center, a healthy scratch for the Kings to the checking center alongside Stu Grimson and Ian Lapperriere.

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by Corine Gatti
on

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Norfolk went to the locker behind by three goals after the first. Within minutes, goalie Michel Larocque had two goals that were both driven into the right corner of the net. What seem to be a devastating first period for the boys in the blue, they returned to their dressing room again after the second with a total of eighteen shots which three goals were capitalized. “Once we got our momentum, things kept going and going. We got the puck in the net and we were rewarded in the second for it,” said Ajay Baines who had an assist on the tying goal. And that reward paid handsomely.

With over 23 home victories in the regular season, home ice has been a problem in the last three games. But with their come from behind win over the Ducks, Norfolk has proved that they will not go down with out a fight. Mark Bell cashed in two of the three goals and defense arose out of sleep. “We were down by th Read more»

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by Jason Shaner
on
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by Ken McKenna
on

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The recent draft history of the Buffalo Sabres is a perfect example of the difficulties of assembling a solid, cohesive defensive unit. In the NHL drafts of 1989-1999, Buffalo used their top pick in the draft 6 times to select a defenseman (Kevin Haller, Phillipe Boucher, David Cooper, Denis Tsygurov, Jay McKee, Dimitri Kalinin). Of those 6 picks, only McKee and Kalinin have shown better than average ability at their position, with Kalinin being a rookie this year. The only other player from that group to log substantial time in the NHL is Kevin Haller, who would probably qualify as a journeyman defenseman.

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