Adam Janosik

Hometown:

Spiska Nova Ves Slovakia

Currently Playing In:

Europe

Birthday:

1992-09-07

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2010

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2010

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

3rd round (72nd overall), 2010

Weight:

170 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2007-08: Janosik scored 4 goals with 15 assists and had 38 PIM in 42 games for HC Liberec in the U-18 Czech Junior League.

2008-09: Janosik split the season between HC Liberec's U-18 and U-20 teams in Czech juniors. He scored 1 goal with 8 assists and 12 PIM in 22 games for the U-20 squad and scored 7 goals with 19 assists and 39 PIM in 20 games at the U-18 level. Janosik represented Slovakia in the WJC U-18 tournament; scoring 1 goal with 4 assists and 2 PIM in six games as Slovakia finished seventh in the ten-team tournament. Janosik was selected in the first round (46th overall) by Gatineau Olympiques in the 2009 CHL Import Draft.

2009-10: Janosik fit in well with Gatineau in his first year of North American junior hockey. He was the second-leading scorer among Gatineau defensemen with 9 goals and 26 assists and his +14 plus/minus rating was only one point less than Olympiques' leading scorer Tye McGinn's +15. Gatineau finished third in the Western Division and defeated Montreal in seven games in the first round of playoff before falling to eventual league runner-up Saint John in four straight in the second round. Janosik scored 5 goals (four on the power play), with 2 assists and was -6 with 4 PIM. He suffered a concussion in Game Three vs. Saint John and didn't play in the final game.

2010-11: Janosik skated in 60 of 68 games for the Gatineau Olympiques in his second year with the club and represented Slovakia at the 2011 U20 World Junior Championship. Janosik scored 7 goals with 25 assists and was +17 with 37 PMs on a Gatineau team that finished third in the competitive West Division before advancing to the QMJHL's playoff finals. He was -3 in 24 playoff games with 5 goals, 4 assists and 12 PMs. Janosik led eighth-place Slovakia with five assists in six games and was +1 with 2 PMs.
 
 

Talent Analysis

Janosik is a thin, young player whose game is predicated on skating, moving the puck and creating scoring opportunities for players around him. He relies on his speed, quickness and hockey sense to compensate for a lack of bulk and strength. He can be overpowered physically at times due to his size and lack of physical development but anticipates well to keep himself out of one-on-one situations. Janosik's defensive play and positioning are sometimes erratic. Janosik should improve the velocity of his shot and his ability to stick handle in tight spaces as he adds muscle and strength to his frame. Currently lacking in physical and technical skills, Janosik is a prospect because of his offensive instincts, creativity, and willingness to attack.

Future

Janosik will return to Gatineau for his second season of junior hockey following Tampa Bay's training camp. Still very raw in terms of physical development and positional play, he has the potential to be a puck-moving defenseman who is at his best in transitional play at the NHL level. Coaches will tell you that it's easier to teach the defensive side of the game and develop strength than to develop playmaking players who are able to execute and make decisions at high speed. Janosik has the ability to do the latter.

Canucks’ Defensemen

by Kirk Pedersen
on

A look at the young blueliners who will shape the Canucks’ backline for the coming seasons.

The Big Kahuna of all Canuck prospects, not to mention defensemen, is undoubtedly Bryan Allen. The Giant has been slowed in his development by a slew of injuries, which is unfortunate, if it weren’t for injuries, he probably would have spent the majority of ’00-’01 in Vancouver.

Another of the newcomers this season unfortunately didn’t make the NHL. Rene Vydareny, a steal in the third round of the 1999 Entry Draft, spent a lot of this season walking around Vancouver, as he could not get out of a European contract agreement, which prevented him from playing minor pro. (i.e. the AHL, IHL, UHL, whichever other leagues) Once Rene got under contract, one thought he could just step right in and put up points, but it’s good that the Canucks didn’t rush him along in his development, as he has much to learn in the minor leagues before becoming a productive NHL’er. He only had one lonely point in thirty-nine games with the Blades of the IHL, and looked out of place when he was put on the ice by coach Smyl. He is, however, only one year removed from Junior hockey. He will definitely be worth the wait for the Canucks. ETA: 2004, or late 2003.

The next young defenseman is talented, young Zenith Komarniski. He has raw ability. He hasn’t shown the Canucks all that much thus far in his pro career, although he did earn an eighteen-game call-up with the big club last season, as injuries ravaged the Canucks’ blueline. He has as much potential as any d Read more»

Habs’ Prospects Improving

by Chris Boucher
on
When trying to determine whether a player will develop NHL calibre skills, we tend to look at how that player is improving year to year. A prospect is just that; a prospect. Only by improving year to year will any player develop the skills necessary to produce at the NHL level. Skating, speed and strength are difficult attributes to measure on a year to year basis. They are far less tangible than raw stats, but in no way less important. The easiest way to measure a player’s improvement is by breaking down their production into a point per game basis. Then comparing that number to the previous year’s total.

When comparing The Montreal Canadiens’ prospects’ point per game totals from this season with those of 1999-2000, Johan Eneqvist shows the greatest improvement. The young Swede was chosen with one of the Canadiens’ 4th round picks, 109th overall in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft. The 6’0″, 183 lbs. center averaged 0.64 PPG during the 99-00 season. Through 21 games this season he averaged an incredible 1.62 PPG; an improvement of 0.98. Canadiens’ fans will be keeping a close eye on Eneqvist’s progression next season.

A close second to Eneqvist is Chicoutimi’s Christian Larrivée. Chosen in the 4th round of the 2000 NHL Entry Draft, Larrivée scored more goals this year than he did points during the entire 99-00 season. The 6’3′, 195 Lbs. center averaged only 0.33 PPG in 99-00. Through 72 games this season He averaged 1.11 PPG; a solid improvement of 0.78 PPG. Larrivée must however, improve his defensive game. He finished 99-00 with an ugly Read more»

Related Articles