Adam Janosik

Hometown:

Spiska Nova Ves Slovakia

Currently Playing In:

Europe

Birthday:

1992-09-07

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2010

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2010

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

3rd round (72nd overall), 2010

Weight:

170 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2007-08: Janosik scored 4 goals with 15 assists and had 38 PIM in 42 games for HC Liberec in the U-18 Czech Junior League.

2008-09: Janosik split the season between HC Liberec's U-18 and U-20 teams in Czech juniors. He scored 1 goal with 8 assists and 12 PIM in 22 games for the U-20 squad and scored 7 goals with 19 assists and 39 PIM in 20 games at the U-18 level. Janosik represented Slovakia in the WJC U-18 tournament; scoring 1 goal with 4 assists and 2 PIM in six games as Slovakia finished seventh in the ten-team tournament. Janosik was selected in the first round (46th overall) by Gatineau Olympiques in the 2009 CHL Import Draft.

2009-10: Janosik fit in well with Gatineau in his first year of North American junior hockey. He was the second-leading scorer among Gatineau defensemen with 9 goals and 26 assists and his +14 plus/minus rating was only one point less than Olympiques' leading scorer Tye McGinn's +15. Gatineau finished third in the Western Division and defeated Montreal in seven games in the first round of playoff before falling to eventual league runner-up Saint John in four straight in the second round. Janosik scored 5 goals (four on the power play), with 2 assists and was -6 with 4 PIM. He suffered a concussion in Game Three vs. Saint John and didn't play in the final game.

2010-11: Janosik skated in 60 of 68 games for the Gatineau Olympiques in his second year with the club and represented Slovakia at the 2011 U20 World Junior Championship. Janosik scored 7 goals with 25 assists and was +17 with 37 PMs on a Gatineau team that finished third in the competitive West Division before advancing to the QMJHL's playoff finals. He was -3 in 24 playoff games with 5 goals, 4 assists and 12 PMs. Janosik led eighth-place Slovakia with five assists in six games and was +1 with 2 PMs.
 
 

Talent Analysis

Janosik is a thin, young player whose game is predicated on skating, moving the puck and creating scoring opportunities for players around him. He relies on his speed, quickness and hockey sense to compensate for a lack of bulk and strength. He can be overpowered physically at times due to his size and lack of physical development but anticipates well to keep himself out of one-on-one situations. Janosik's defensive play and positioning are sometimes erratic. Janosik should improve the velocity of his shot and his ability to stick handle in tight spaces as he adds muscle and strength to his frame. Currently lacking in physical and technical skills, Janosik is a prospect because of his offensive instincts, creativity, and willingness to attack.

Future

Janosik will return to Gatineau for his second season of junior hockey following Tampa Bay's training camp. Still very raw in terms of physical development and positional play, he has the potential to be a puck-moving defenseman who is at his best in transitional play at the NHL level. Coaches will tell you that it's easier to teach the defensive side of the game and develop strength than to develop playmaking players who are able to execute and make decisions at high speed. Janosik has the ability to do the latter.

Predators: Cloning the Dallas Stars

by Brian Roe
on
He had the smile of an eighteen-year old kid…partly because he had just been selected number two overall in the 1998 NHL Entry Draft…and party because he was eighteen years old. David Legwand…the first draft selection in Nashville Predators history. Legwand automatically became the “cornerstone of the Nashville franchise for years to come.” His blazing speed and lightning quick hands landed him a spot on the Nashville pro roster less than a year after he was drafted.

He was called the “best goaltender in the world for his age.” He was one of only a handful of goaltenders to be selected in the top ten in the history of the NHL Entry Draft. Brian Finley…chosen sixth overall in the 1999 Entry Draft. One year and an OHL MVP later, Finley is the future number one butterfly goalie for the Preds.

Now think, how many big time free agents have the Predators signed in their history? How many blockbuster trades have the Preds been a part of? If you answered zero to both of those questions, then you are correct. The Predators are using a very painstaking system of building their team into playoff contenders. However, they are using a system that has been used before.

Read more»

Senators Update – Part 3 (Forwards)

by Nathan Estabrooks
on

Forwards

The Ottawa Senators’ forward prospects fall into two main categories. Fast,offensively gifted forwards of European nationality and two-way North Americans.
Obviously there are some exceptions to this rule. Martin Havlat, last years 26th pick over all appears to have some defensive awareness. Although Havlat turns heads with his offence there is a well-rounded game underneath the flash. Occasionally Havlat appears to
lose focus and it is the back of his game that most suffers then. At 6’1″, 178 lbs. he’s got good size which should make defensive play easier, but to make the jump to the North American game Havlat must get used to the physical grind. Second behind Havlat on the
depth chart is Russian winger Petr Schastlivy. Many people got their first glimpse of Schastlivy at the ’98 World Junior Championships in Winnipeg. He is graced with good natural speed, balance and the sort of scoring touch you can’t teach. Mid season play with Read more»

Senators Update – Part 2 (Defense & Goaltending)

by Nathan Estabrooks
on

Defence

The Ottawa Senators blue line is a very crowed place; it has been so for a few years now. Ever since the Nashville expansion draft, protecting the plethora of defenseman has been a major concern for management. Coach Jacques Martin likes to play six defensemen
(and often times seven). Laukkanen was off loaded to Pittsburgh, and Kravchuk will probably not be resigned. That leaves youngsters Redden, Philips, Salo, and Traverse along with the ageing York. Forget about Grant Ledyard who is referred by teammates to as old yellar. He will most likely retire. Salo and Traverse are now everyday players. This leaves Karel Rachunek as the only prospect left. John Gruden was recalled from Grand Rapids a few times, but injury problems were not kind to the former Bruin. (Rachunek has been a pleasant surprise. The ninth round, 229th ’97 draft pick was not supposed to be in camp that first year and certainly was not supposed to make it as deep into camp as he did the year after that. There is nothing flashy about this player but the most off-putting thing about him is his confidence. Rachunek did not look out of place back there. He was more defensively sound then Philips or Salo. He is progressing at the usual pace, and unless the inevitable Yashin trade brings a solid NHL defenseman, Rachunek will most likely find himself playing 50 games in the frigid capital this winter.)
Read more»

Senators Update – Part 1 (Overview)

by Nathan Estabrooks
on
Despite a first round exit to the Buffalo Sabre’s in the ’99 playoffs Ottawa fans were very optimistic. The team had clinched the NorthEast Division pennant and broken the hundred point barrier for the first time. The optimism didn’t last long; there was dark
cumulus off in the distance. It began with mumblings of yet another Alexi Yashin holdout, and as then with a thunderous flash, general manager Rick Dudley fled for last place Tampa Bay. It was as if the team was itself struck by lighting. The shock of Pierre “the ghost”
Gautier leaving for the Anaheim Mighty Ducks was one thing, but now the Ottawa Senators had lost their second GM in one year. Worse still was the mid season departure of Ray Shero to Nashville. Groomed as a future Ottawa GM Mr. Shero had been an assistant GM
with the Ottawa Senators since the time of Randy Sexton. The only hockey man left in town was Marshall Johnstone. By all accounts Johnstone is a very knowledgeable scout and player personal director. He worked in the Devils and Red Wings systems previous to
Ottawa’s, but he is a man who hasn’t be in full control of a team since the days of the Don Cherry and the Colorado Rockies; a very different NHL indeed. The Read more»

Preds Look for Late Bloomers

by Martin Dittman
on
Nashville Predators GM David Poile has done it once again. He’s plucked
someone else’s castoffs in the hope of rejuvenating them. This time it’s
two players off the waiver wire from the New York Islanders. Mike Watt and
Sean Haggerty – two 24 year old underachievers – were acquired this week off
the waiver wire. Both forwards, they have struggled to gain a foothold in
the NHL but Poile is ready to give them a shot.

The reasons are quite obvious. Watt and Haggerty are both highly
talented even if they have bounced around through the NHL and minor leagues.
As second round draft picks in 1994, both have had minimal shots at the NHL
with Watt faring the best. In 1999-2000, Watt played in 45 games. In those
games, he had 11 points while spending part of the year with Lowell in the
AHL. With a salary of only $375,000 the upside is obvious. Watt has
proven he can play but on an inconsistent basis. His large size and hard
play should help his case to be an NHL regular. The hope is as he matures,
he will perform better and hopefully battle for a roster spot during
training camp.

Haggerty was a prolific scorer in juniors and continued on to do that in
the minors, only to struggle in his brief NHL stays. He has only played 11
games at the NHL level so most would argue that he has yet to receive a fair
shot. His blazing speed should fit in well with the speedy Preds, giving Read more»