Adam Janosik

Hometown:

Spiska Nova Ves Slovakia

Currently Playing In:

Europe

Birthday:

1992-09-07

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2010

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2010

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

3rd round (72nd overall), 2010

Weight:

170 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2007-08: Janosik scored 4 goals with 15 assists and had 38 PIM in 42 games for HC Liberec in the U-18 Czech Junior League.

2008-09: Janosik split the season between HC Liberec's U-18 and U-20 teams in Czech juniors. He scored 1 goal with 8 assists and 12 PIM in 22 games for the U-20 squad and scored 7 goals with 19 assists and 39 PIM in 20 games at the U-18 level. Janosik represented Slovakia in the WJC U-18 tournament; scoring 1 goal with 4 assists and 2 PIM in six games as Slovakia finished seventh in the ten-team tournament. Janosik was selected in the first round (46th overall) by Gatineau Olympiques in the 2009 CHL Import Draft.

2009-10: Janosik fit in well with Gatineau in his first year of North American junior hockey. He was the second-leading scorer among Gatineau defensemen with 9 goals and 26 assists and his +14 plus/minus rating was only one point less than Olympiques' leading scorer Tye McGinn's +15. Gatineau finished third in the Western Division and defeated Montreal in seven games in the first round of playoff before falling to eventual league runner-up Saint John in four straight in the second round. Janosik scored 5 goals (four on the power play), with 2 assists and was -6 with 4 PIM. He suffered a concussion in Game Three vs. Saint John and didn't play in the final game.

2010-11: Janosik skated in 60 of 68 games for the Gatineau Olympiques in his second year with the club and represented Slovakia at the 2011 U20 World Junior Championship. Janosik scored 7 goals with 25 assists and was +17 with 37 PMs on a Gatineau team that finished third in the competitive West Division before advancing to the QMJHL's playoff finals. He was -3 in 24 playoff games with 5 goals, 4 assists and 12 PMs. Janosik led eighth-place Slovakia with five assists in six games and was +1 with 2 PMs.
 
 

Talent Analysis

Janosik is a thin, young player whose game is predicated on skating, moving the puck and creating scoring opportunities for players around him. He relies on his speed, quickness and hockey sense to compensate for a lack of bulk and strength. He can be overpowered physically at times due to his size and lack of physical development but anticipates well to keep himself out of one-on-one situations. Janosik's defensive play and positioning are sometimes erratic. Janosik should improve the velocity of his shot and his ability to stick handle in tight spaces as he adds muscle and strength to his frame. Currently lacking in physical and technical skills, Janosik is a prospect because of his offensive instincts, creativity, and willingness to attack.

Future

Janosik will return to Gatineau for his second season of junior hockey following Tampa Bay's training camp. Still very raw in terms of physical development and positional play, he has the potential to be a puck-moving defenseman who is at his best in transitional play at the NHL level. Coaches will tell you that it's easier to teach the defensive side of the game and develop strength than to develop playmaking players who are able to execute and make decisions at high speed. Janosik has the ability to do the latter.

Is Kip a Keeper Because of the Reaper

by Tony Calfo
on
With the departure of Sean O’Donnell and Steve McKenna in the expansion draft, the Kings had a glaring need for some muscle. Enter 35-year-old Stu Grimson, who signed a one-year contract last week to patrol the ice for the Kings in 2000. While this is a great PR move and gives the Kings a season with one of the toughest forwards to ever lace them up, how much of a difference can Stu make? After all, enforcers have moved a lot this offseason and a low draft pick could have given the Kings players like Oliwa, Cote or any number of young thugs. Why Grimson? The reason is twofold- Kip Brennan and potentially Brian McGratten.
Read more»

Bruins: Scandanavians “R” Us

by pbadmin
on
The 2000 NHL entry draft saw the Boston Bruins select a Swedish-born player with their top pick for the first time in franchise history. They didn’t stop there. Using a second first-rounder acquired from the Colorado Avalanche, they drafted another Swedish player. The selections of Lars Jonsson and Martin Samuelsson were merely the tip of the iceberg, as the Bruins took a total of nine Europeans of twelve skaters drafted. Of those nine, five hailed from the countries of Finland and Sweden. Boston’s strategy marks a new direction for the team, as it clearly demonstrates an attempt to stock the organization with skill players rather than the traditional method of going after North American character types with less finesse.

For Boston, the Euro invasion didn’t really begin in earnest until the 1992 draft, when Boston chose a multitude of Russian players, beginning with its first-ever draft pick from the former Soviet Union, Dmitri Kvartalnov. Since that year, the Bruins have chosen a total of 34 Europeans. By contrast, between 1983 and 1991, covering the same amount of draft years, the total count of European players selected by Boston numbers just seven. The full integration of skaters across the Atlantic into the NHL has dictated a necessity for teams to capitalize on that premier talent, or be swept aside in the standings. The Bruins seem to have taken an active interest in recruiting players from Europe, but in particular those competing in the Swedish and Finnish Elite and Junior Leagues.
Read more»

Sens News and Notes for the Week of July 9th

by Nathan Estabrooks
on

Prospect Camp

There is a prospect camp being held in the southern suburbs of the capital this week. Mike Fisher will be there continuing his path to recovery, but most interesting will be the appearance of Martin Havlat and Mathieu Chouinard. Last week both players signed contracts with the Senators. Havlat was a first round pick in ’99, while Chouinard was a Senators first round pick in ’98 and a second round pick in ’00.

The President and The Convict

As you most likely know arbitrator Lawrence Holden ruled in favour of the NHL and the Ottawa Senators over Alexi Yashin. Citing a verbal agreement between the former president of the NHL John Ziegler and the disgraced founder of the NHLPA Alan Eagleson, the ruling surprised many. There are murmurs the NHL had been very unhappy with the recent string arbitrator decisions. It should be noted Holden is the same man who ruled Mike Van Ryn a free agent.

Bryden Wants Yashin Back

Rod Bryden owner of the team has invited holdout center Alexi Yashin to return the Senators. Saying the disagreement was never anything but professional, Bryden wont okay the player and still expects Yashin to fulfill his contractual obligations. The educated guess is that Bryden is merely enjoying the moment. When you make it known you are trying to move an asset, it is important not to devaluate it. Public opinion in the city seems to be strongly behind a trade as opposed to a rapprochement.

Senators 2000-2001 Budget
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Bruins: The Thin Blue Line

by pbadmin
on

by Derek Cheng

Despite having an all-star future Hall of Fame defenseman and a Vezina Trophy finalist, the Bruins still
had a very tough time keeping the puck out of their own net last season. They really need to improve their
defense if they want to start winning hockey games.

The promise of a free agent spending spree this summer has brought in limited help on defense with regards to some
of the higher-profile names available on the open market. The only signing thus far has been 33 year old Peter Popovic.
The Bruins did manage to re-sign Don Sweeney, which was deemed vital, since he is the most experienced Bruin and one of the few who played well last season.
But, with Popovic aboard and Sweeney back in the fold, there is only one difference between the 00-01 blueline and the 99-00 blueline.
Four defenseman remain from last year (Kyle McLaren,Darren Van Impe,Hal Gill, Sweeney) and the new face, Popovic,
replaces the legendary face of Ray Bourque. Popovic doesn’t even come close to comparing with Bourque offensively,
but he may be able to give Boston a steady stay-at-home defenseman the Bruins were sorely lacking last season.
Although the defense unit may prove to be adequate, if McLaren stays healthy and consistent and Gill learns to use his size,
there is still one more hole that needs to be plugged. The Bruins need another regular to fill out the top 6 on defense. Read more»

Part 2 of the Sharks draft review

by pbadmin
on
Here is Part 2 of the Sharks draft review. If you missed Part 1, read it here: http://hockeysfuture.com/sharks91-95draftreview1.html
Again, this is an in-depth look back at every player the San Jose Sharks drafted during 1991-1995. This article will look back at the 94 and 95 drafts. At the end, there is a small recap of recent San Jose Sharks news. Enjoy!

1994 Entry Draft

11th Jeff Friesen
37th Angel Nikolov
66th Alexei Yegorov
89th Vaclav Varada
115th Brian Swanson
141st Alexander Korolyuk
167th Sergei Gorbachev
193rd Eric Landry
219th Evegni Nabokov
240th Tomas Pisa
245th Aniket Dhadphale
271st David Beauregard

The 1994 draft is probably the strongest the Sharks had from 91-95. It will probably go down as one of the better drafts of all-time for the Sharks (so far up there with 1997 and 1998). The Sharks were able to get a stud with the 11th pick (Jeff Friesen who could turn out to be the best player of the 94 class). The impressive part of this draft was the talent the Sharks got in the later rounds. Varada has turned into a key player in Buffalo, Korolyuk is awesome young forward who figures into the Sharks future, Nabokov is a solid goalie prospect, and Landry has NHL potential.

Read more»

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