Blaine Byron
Image: Dan Hickling

Blaine Byron

Hometown:

Manotick Ontario

Currently Playing In:

NCAA

Birthday:

1995-02-21

Position:

RW

Eligible for draft:

2013

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2013

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

6th round (179th overall), 2013

Weight:

163 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2010-11: Blaine Byron joined the Kemptville 73’s late in the season; skating in nine junior A games as a 16-year-old. He played six midget AAA games with the Upper Canada Cyclones and was one of the top scorers for the Cyclones’ midget minor team. Byron scored 1 goal with 1 assist and had two penalty minutes in his time with the 73’s. In six games with the midget AAA Cyclones he scored 2 goals with 1 assist and had 2 penalty minutes. Byron scored 18 goals with 30 assists and 12 penalty minutes in 30 games with the Cyclones midget minor team. He was selected by Niagara in the 11th round (220th overall) of the 2011 OHL Priority Draft.

2011-12: Byron was the leading scorer for Kemptville in the re-named Central Canada Hockey League in his first full season of junior hockey. Skating in 42 of 62 games for the 73’s, he scored 12 goals with a team-high 27 assists and had 20 penalty minutes. Kemptville missed the CCHL playoffs; finishing 11th in the 12-team league.

2012-13: Byron began the season with Kemptville before being acquired by the Smiths Falls Bears at the CCHL trade deadline. He was selected to represent Canada East in the 2012 U19 World Junior A Challenge. In 24 games with Kemptville, which finished last in the Robinson Division, Byron scored 7 goals with 16 assists and had 8 penalty minutes. He skated in 27 games for Smiths Falls and scored 5 goals with 24 assists and 16 penalty minutes. The Bears reached the playoffs after finishing fourth in the Robinson Division. Byron had 1 assist in five playoff games. He had 4 assists in five games for Canada East at the WJAC. In October 2012, Byron committed to playing college hockey at Maine in 2013-14. Ranked 122nd amongst North American skaters in Central Scouting’s final rankings, he was selected by Pittsburgh in the sixth round (179th overall) of the 2013 NHL Draft.

2013-14: Byron skated in 32 of 35 games for the University of Maine in his freshman season. Playing mostly right wing in a third line role for the Black Bears, he scored 8 goals with 8 assists and had an even plus/minus with 4 penalty minutes. Maine finished sixth in Hockey East. After defeating Merrimack in a preliminary game the Black Bears were swept by Providence in a best-of-three Hockey East quarterfinal series.

Talent Analysis

Byron is a talented playmaking forward who possesses a very creative offensive mind, He is very good at creating offensive both off the rush and down low and has excellent vision and anticipation, which allow him to create space for his linemates and himself. Aside from adding strength and size, Byron needs to develop more of a shooter mentality, if only to cause opposing defensemen to back off a little. He also needs to simplify his game and learn when to chip in the puck and when to carry it.

Future

Byron is in his sophomore season at the University of Maine in the 2014-15 season. Skating on the top two lines for the Black Bears, he has been played on both wings and is among the leading scorers as Maine has overcome a slow start and is in the thick of the Hockey East race. Byron is likely to use his final two years of NCAA eligibility before turning pro. Long-range he projects as a second or third line scoring forward capable of playing either wing or center.

Pittsburgh Penguins remain stacked with collegiate talent

by Ian Altenbaugh
on

Jake Guentzel finished with 13 goals and 25 assists in his sophomore season with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (Courtesy of Zach Bolinger/Icon Sportswire)

Photo: Jake Guentzel finished with 13 goals and 25 assists in his sophomore season with Nebraska-Omaha (Courtesy of Zach Bolinger/Icon Sportswire)

Under former general manager Ray Shero, the Pittsburgh Penguins emphasized college-bound talent in the middle to later parts of the draft, and they generally avoided drafting players fromĀ overseas. The result is a system deep on college talent and short on Europeans. Read more»

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