Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Germans attending camps

by Oliver Janz
on

Following are news and facts for all german players who were drafted in this years NHL Entry Draft and the players who will attend the Rookie-, Development- or Evaluation Camps by NHL-Teams. The list is in alphabetical order:

Jan Benda (29, Edmonton Oilers/NHL)

After signing a high paid contract with AK Bars Kazan from Russia the Oilers offered him an one-way-contract to help their bluechip prospect Jani Rita to grow up in Edmonton. Benda has the potential to play in the third or fourth line in the NHL. He have to fight for a place in the camp, but the chance is high: Benda maked the NHL four years ago in the camp in Washington. To read the whole story about his moving to Edmonton click here.

Boris Blank (23, Eisbären Berlin/DEL), Rookie/Evaluation Camp, LA Kings

Blank was born in Kazakhstan and is a friend of Eduard Lewandowski. They played together for a long time. He’s a fast skater and more a sniper than a top passing forward. Called “Bum Bum Boris”, he also has a very good shot, but his defense work must be better. Blank played in the german minors for years with a spell in the DEL for 18 Games (Five Points) as he wear the jersey from the Moskitos Essenin the year 2000. Blank also played in the pre-games for the german national team before the world championships. He has no chance for making the NHL, the chance for signing a contract with a farmteam is even lo Read more»

Fetisov Aims to Recreate Russia’s Past Glory

by Jake Dole
on
On Monday, August 20, 2001, Vyacheslav Fetisov was officially named the General Manager and Head Coach of team Russia for the Olympic games in Salt Lake City. Although the news came somewhat as a shock to the people in North America, rumours had been going around Russia for the better part of the week prior to the announcement. Needless to say, Monday’s press conference did not seem at all like news to the hockey media in Russia.
Getting axed is Boris Mikhailov, the man whose contract ran with the Olympiad through the Olympics. In is Fetisov, a 43-year old, former Soviet top defenseman and a legend of Russian hockey. With no head coaching, nor managerial experience, Fetisov will be in for a long run to assemble and prepare a team that is already behind it’s schedule. Despite the lack of Olympic experience, Fetisov seems to have all the makings of a solid coach; an assistant with the New Jersey Devils, he was a key contributor to the Devils’ back-to-back Stanley Cup finals appearances. The resurgence of star Alexander Mogilny has also been directly linked to Fetisov’s coaching tactics.
At the age of 43, Fetisov is one the youngest Head Coaches in the history of the Russian/Soviet Olympic team. At 39, Arkadi Chernishev debuted in 1954, and Anatoli Tarasov coached the Soviets in 1958 at the age of 40. There is no doubt that Fetisov will be under a lot of scrutiny, as all of his moves will be monitored under the microscope. If Russia fails at the Olympic games, the defeat could be hard to swallow. Although the expectations are not quite hi Read more»

Farkas (And Others) Knocking On The Door

by David Lau
on

Time For Farkas (And Others) To Show What They Can Do

By David Lau

This summer, Maple Leafs fans everywhere have witnessed a dramatic alteration of the team’s line-up, hopefully for the better. Still, one wonders how much youth from St. John’s will be able to obtain full time jobs when this September’s training camp concludes. In the end, many believe that at least one or two new faces from the farm system will be able to grab a permanent roster spot with the big club.

Let’s examine some facts. We all know a first unit comprised of Roberts, Sundin and Renberg is a lock. The second line will consist of Reichel and Mogilny with Nik Antropov probably being a good candidate for the opening on the left side. The third line will probably consist of newly acquired centre Travis Green, Shayne Corson (who’s a stellar role player and provides valuable leadership to the team) along with Shayne’s brother-in-law, Darcy Tucker. The latter will provide speed, physical play and ample grit.

There are probably as many as 2 openings on the 4th line with Tie Domi having been suspended for the first 8 games of the season. Jonas Hoglund, will most probably be traded before October arrives due to his ineffectiveness during the playoffs and his overall inconsistency. This might allow a player like Jeff Farkas to finally receive some well deserved exposure at the NHL level. The last opening on the 4th line will most probably go to Alyn McCauley, who has had his progress stalled due to various Read more»

Coyotes Update: Signings, Signings and More Signings

by Brandon LeBourveau
on
Although he hasn’t officially signed a contract with the Phoenix Coyotes, Krys Kolanos, the team’s 1st round pick in 2000, has made it official that he is turning pro, and therefore will forfeit his remaining two years of college eligibility. Kolanos has been skating with some NHL players in Phoenix, and most likely a deal will be reached before training camp.

“I’ve made a commitment to turning pro and I’ve tried to prepare myself mentally, physically and emotionally all summer. That’s why I’m down here, to get a little taste of it all,” Kolanos said. “These guys are just getting some work in and it’s impossible to tell how you might do . . . but staying in the NHL, that’s definitely the plan. I want to get stronger and more consistent to the point where I can bring everything to the table every night.”

Daymond Langkow, acquired from the Philadelphia Flyers earlier this summer for two future draft picks, was awarded $4.2 million over two years in his arbitration case. Langkow will earn $1.95 million this season and $2.25 next year. The Coyotes are banking on the 25 year old center to have an excellent season, after the team dealt away centers Jeremy Roenick and Robert Reichel this summer. Langkow and center Michal Handzus will fight it out for the 1st line center ice position.

The Coyotes’ have announced the signing of defenseman Jay Leach. A 5th round pick in 1998, Leach played this past season for the Providence Friars of the NCAA, recording 4 goals, 21 assists and 104 penalty minutes in 40 games. Jay will be in trai Read more»

Next in Line for the Sharks

by Mike Delfino
on

The importance of a team’s depth at all positions was proven last year when at various times in the season many of the Sharks top players such as Owen Nolan, Vincent Damphousse and Steve Shields missed games due to injuries or suspensions. Without the contributions of players like Tony Granato, Jim Montgomery and Bill Lindsay, it is hard to say where the Sharks would have finished in the playoff race. Particularly Granato filled a role where he patched holes where necessary; ending up playing 61 games in what will likely be his last NHL season.

As the Sharks close in on training camp, the core of their team remains in tact. The addition of Adam Graves and the retention of Gary Suter gives the Sharks four solid scoring lines and three experienced defensive pairings. The only players still unsigned are defenseman Mike Rathje, center Patrick Marleau, and right wing Todd Harvey.

While the Sharks have prospects such as Marcel Goc and Jeff Jillson who are considered solid to blue chip prospects, if in need of help, players such as these may not necessarily be the best choice, as further playing time in various developmental leagues may be in order, or in the case of players in college or playing in CHL, can’t play in the NHL even if they were ready.

Last season it was the Sharks forward lines that were plagued by the injury bug. With Nolan missing 25 games due to various injuries and a 12-game suspension by the NHL, and Damphousse missing almost half the season with a shoulder injury, the Sharks were without their two best players, much of which at the s Read more»

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