Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Rodman goes one-on-one with Hockey’s Future

by pbadmin
on

Bruins ninth round draft choice Marcel Rodman answers Peter Baptista’s questions about finally being drafted and the likelihood of turning pro this season.

PB: When did you find out the Bruins drafted you?
MR: I found out the good news over the internet, just about half an hour after it happened in Florida. After that I got a few calls from overseas too from my friends and my agent.

PB: Had they spoken with you before the draft?
MR: I hadn’t talked to anybody before the draft, any team at all.

PB: If not, did you think you would be drafted this year?
MR: I was hoping to get drafted, but because I hadn’t been last year I knew my chances were a lot smaller, so I had a feeling if it happens it won’t happen before the 8th round.

PB: Have the Bruins spoke to you about signing a contract, and playing in the organization next year?
MR: As far as I know they are going to give me a chance to play in Providence of course if I show them something good at the training camp, and I don’t know anything about the contract yet.

PB: What would be your preference, Providence (AHL) or returning to Peterborough (OHL) for another season? Read more»

Caps add Jagr, but lose some great young talent

by Rick Davis
on
The Washington Capitals traded Kris Beech, Michal Sivek, and Ross Lupaschuk, along with future considerations to Pittsburgh for Jaromir Jagr and Frantisek Kucera. While this trade is great for the Caps right now, it depletes their prospect pool and may come back to haunt them when Jagr’s contract expires in two years. The Caps get a player like Jagr without giving up any current roster players.

Here’s an attempt to put into perspective what the Capitals lost and how big of a hole it puts in their system of prospects.

Kris Beech probably had the most potential upside of any Capitals prospect. He’s a great passer and he should develop into a first or second line center. He was pencilled in to Portland to play in the AHL next year, as he would probably benefit from more ice time in the AHL as opposed to limited opportunities as a rookie in the NHL.

Going in to this summer it looked like Michal Sivek would be the prospect who would make the Caps out of camp, and he could be on the Penguins next fall. If the Penguins trade Jan Hrdina or Robert Lang, Sivek has an even greater chance of making the team. However, it is likely that Michal would also benefit from a year in the AHL, perhaps two.
Read more»

Beyond the first round

by Jake Dole
on
The 2001 NHL entry draft was, no doubt, one of the deepest in history. With the mass of talent from all over the world, NHL General Mangers were presented with the tough task of selecting young players, relying mainly on scouting, interviews, physical characteristics and personal likings. A fair share of surprises occurred during the draft. In the first round, the Boston Bruins selected Shaone Morrisonn, a tall, lanky kid from Kamloops. Despite his obvious talents, the Bruins were criticized for taking a chance on a player who many thought was inconsistent. The New Jersey Devils, with the 28th overall pick, selected Adrian Foster, a winger from Saskatoon, WHL. The same Adrian Foster who played only 5 games during the year.
There is no question that as soon as the surefire picks are gone, the rest of the draft turns into a crapshoot. General Managers try to hit home runs by the virtue of selecting those with potential, size and some hockey sense, and hope that some day, the tools come together into a package that winds up to be a solid NHL player.
It is interesting to point out that at the draft, Russia was represented by a bundle of hockey talent. Whether in the first round, or in the ninth round, there were players that embodied an undoubtedly rich bulk of potential; maybe more than any other country. To me, it was especially vital to appreciate where the less publicized and advertised names went. The troika of Kovalchuk, Svitov and Chistov was a top 5 lock, months before the draft.
The fir Read more»

Hurricanes Sign Defenseman Igor Knyazev

by Brandon LeBourveau
on
The Carolina Hurricanes have announced that the team has come to terms with Russian defenseman Igor Knyazev, who was selected 15th overall in the 1st Round of the 2001 NHL Entry Draft. Knyazev signed a three year deal, including a $900,000 signing bonus, the most ever given to a Hurricanes’ 1st round entry draft pick.

“We are very pleased to sign Igor,” assistant general manager Jason Karmanos said. “This will give him the opportunity to make our team. This will also get him acclimated to North America as soon as possible.”

Since Knyazev was drafted out of Europe, he has the ability to play in the AHL at 18 years old, unlike players who were drafted out of the OHL, WHL or QMJHL. With the Hurricanes lack of depth on defense, Knyazev will have a good chance of cracking the lineup. He plays a solid all-around game, and doesn’t make many mistakes on the ice. Knyazev plays what is known as a two-way style of game, as he can rush the puck up the ice and chip in offensively while also playing very good defensively and physically in his own zone.

At only 18 years old, rushing Knyazev into the NHL may be too heavy of a burden for him at such a young age. A season or two in the minors would certainly help him get comfortable with North America and the style of game that is played over here, but we’ll have to see how he performs in training camp. With Igor Knyazev and also David Tanabe in the organization, the Hurricanes have two top-notch young defenseman that they can build their team around in the future.

Lost Season in Louisville

by jennifer-mccarty
on

Thoughts and Recollections on a lost season in Louisville

When the Florida Panthers limped to season’s end decimated by injuries all year round, it truly was an eye-opening realization that no team can compete when 367 man-games are missed and the roster is never set. The season truly affected the level of play in another team too, the AHL Louisville Panthers.
With a rotating call-up list, 14 of Louisville’s regulars saw extended time filling in at the NHL level, which included Joey Tetarenko and Brad Ference. Combined with the rotating roster in the AHL, a merciless schedule that saw Louisville play 20 of its first 23 games on the road, and a shaky ownership group, the season closely matched the NHL season as a season to forget.
Joey Tetarenko was called up for 29 games and was able to make an impact with his physical play and chipped in 3 goals as well. Brad Ference was aiming for a roster spot after a solid stint in 99-00, but had the misfortune of getting his jaw broken by Steve Smith in a game of shinny. He wasn’t able to rebound quickly enough and only got to see time in 14 games in South Florida, but is aiming for a roster spot for this upcoming season. Kyle Rossiter spent his whole season in Louisville, but his strong solid play and physical presence will make him one of the key components on the future Panther blue-line.
These 3 players took the time out of their busy off-season to give Hockey’s Future an update of what they are looking forward to, what they want to improve on, and their Read more»

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