Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Kootenay starting to put it together

by Jeff Bromley
on
A six game road trip, four out of the six being wins, a possible nine of twelve points in solidifying their current second place in the Central
Division standings. If you could have asked Kootenay ICE Head Coach Ryan McGill for that result from the second longest road swing the
ICE would encounter this season, there is no doubt that he would’ve answered an emphatic answer in the positive.

Coming off a rather embarrassing 3-1 home loss to the Calgary Hitmen in which they managed only 14 shots in front of a sellout hometown
crowd before the swing into the Pacific Northwest and Central Alberta began, the road trip turned out to be perhaps the most crucial point of
the season for the ICE. A sub-par road trip and the club could’ve found itself in a dogfight for third in the conference standings with a
slumping Calgary Hitmen team and the red-hot Regina Pats. After the addition of the nine points garnered on the trip, the ICE find themselves
with somewhat of a cushion between themselves and a suddenly vulnerable Calgary club and enough of a cushion that Regina isn’t a threat
to their position, yet.

In what could be best described as just another cliche to pile upon the heap of hockey mannerisms, the sentence ‘we’ll get together on the
road trip and come together as a team’, seems to have actually applied here. Given that the two newest members of the club, Mike Lee and Eric
Bowen hadn’t yet found their role within the club the before they left, it seems that they may have found it now. Switching from spot front line
duty to more of checking, p Read more»

An unlikely, but welcome surprise

by Derek Berry
on

Every hockey season has its share of surprises.

Things you couldn’t possibly expect to happen come to the forefront and
most of the time they reach the light by the all-star break. In fact,
if you asked anyone in Springfield, Illinois if they thought a player
named Greg Rallo would be the top scorer on their team – the NAHL’s
Springfield Jr. Blues – and named to Team West for the NAHL All-Star
Game in St. Louis, they would probably ask, “who?”

Even head coach Craig Heggs was surprised Rallo stepped into the
spotlight so soon, although he admitted that he was not surprised by
Rallo’s ability to score goals.

“He’s one of the hardest working players on the team,” says Heggs, who
is in his first season with the Springfield Jr. Blues. “He just had to
get comfortable playing against big, strong players and he’s done that.”


TOUGH ROAD

Rallo’s ascent to stardom in the NAHL has been a rocky one, to say the
least.

Local media, fans and everybody else who could voice a complaint
wondered if a player from the AA hockey ranks could cut it at this
level.

“I caught a lot of heat,’ says Heggs, over his decision to let the
rising star play. “I heard a lot of grumbling from a lot of different
places.”

But, coach Heggs stands by his decision and his persistence has paid
off.

The numbers don’t lie.

Rallo has 27 goals and 16 assists, for 43 points at the all-star
break. He is one of the top scorers at the moment in the NAHL.

Heggs believes in the on-the-job-t Read more»

Ellsworth having Vezina-like season for Soo Indians

by Derek Berry
on
He might remind you of an Olie Kolzig or a Byron Dafoe and he’s having
one heck of a season in goal for the NAHL’s Soo Indians.

His name is Cam Ellsworth. Remember his name. He’s big (6′ 1″ 200
lbs., to be exact), strong and handles the puck with the finesse of a
fine-tuned NHL goaltender.

Soo Indians’ head coach Joe Shawhan, a former goalie himself, knew he
would have a solid netminder coming into this season and had very few
worries.

“He had a good year last year and he came in ready to play this year,”
says Shawhan. “He has played very consistently and that’s carried over
from what he did last year.”


A RELIABLE PRESENCE

This season, the all-star goalie has a 1.94 GAA with a .921 save
percentage, a 26-5 record and 5 shutouts at the halfway point.

Shawhan says Ellsworth has excellent work habits, that will carry him
far in the future.

“When we came into this season he quickly picked up on what he did the
year before,” says Shawhan. “He did the work that was necessary to do
and it wasn’t all that much. We knew he was going to be reliable coming
in.”

Shawhan says Ellsworth merely had to work on his stance and his
compactness in the net.

Ellsworth himself also knew what he had to do coming into this season,
which basically involved standing tall in the net and staying tough.
The skills were there and still are…this season was a matter of carrying
over the consistency.

“I knew we had a good team coming into the season,” said Ellsworth. “I Read more»

Top Prospects, Top Pressure

by Jeff Bromley
on
The sixth annual CHL Top Prospects game took place this past week and it didn’t fail to live up to it’s accrued billing of the showcase of top major junior players on the continent. Trouble is, it’s only one game. Take it or leave it, this game can have a major impact on where and when a player is taken in the NHL Draft come June in Sunrise, Fla. That’s of course not to say that NHL scouts haven’t done their homework and seen each and every player a couple dozen times but in a nationally televised game against your brethren who are fighting for the betterment of their own draft status, the game does take on new meaning in the eyes of scouts and players alike.

Forty 2001 draft eligible players, two teams, celebrity Coaches Don Cherry and Bobby Orr patrolling behind the bench, this game isn’t any All-Star extravaganza, it’s a stage in which to showcase your skills as a player. Think one game can’t make a difference? Think again. Last year’s prospect game is a clear example. Calgary Hitmen goaltender Brent Krahn going into the game in the draft rankings was ranked highest among goalies, save for number one pick overall Rick DiPietro who didn’t declare his eligibility until after the final rankings were released. But in the overall scheme of the things it wasn’t expected that Krahn would be picked until well into the first round, if at all. An outstanding performance at the 2000 edition of the Top Prospects game in Toronto changed all that. Krahn ended up being taken ninth overall by his hometown Calgary Flames. A surprise to some but to others not surprising at Read more»