Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Czech NHL rookies – Josef Vasicek

by Robert Neuhauser
on
In this part I take a closer look at a player, who tries to fill the gap after Keith Primeau in Carolina. It’s a player with nearly the same size and the same leadership qualities. It’s Josef Vasicek.

Josef grew up in a small city of Havlickuv Brod, where he started to play hockey. He was only 5 and he soon became the young star of this provincial city. As long as Josef visited elementary school, everything was OK. But the city of Havlickuv Brod was too small for his talent. Josef had respectable talent and was one of the best players in the country at pee-wee age, but he wasn’t the top talent like Milan Kraft among the 1980 born. Compared to Milan, Josef didn’t have the chance to play hockey for the same time as Milan, as he is 9 months younger (born 09-12-1980). But he could take advantage of his good size. He was taller than most of the guys his age and because of his workouts he had enough strength to use it to his advantage. Josef developed his no-fear style and great play in front of the opponent’s net. The scouts of HC Slavia Praha recognized this fact as the team broke into the Czech Elite league in 1994. The new team wanted to build a solid core of bantam aged players, who were playing in the smaller cities, to have a good base for the future. Some players were supposed to step into the Elite team after their stint with Slavia’s midget and junior teams. Josef, called “Pepa” like all Josefs was one of those players. Slavia fought its way to the elite midget league, ELHD, and Josef contributed for both the Slavia Praha midgets and the Under-16 team. Mil Read more»

Bulldogs led by the goaltending

by Derek Berry
on

There are very few teams in college hockey that can boast about having
this little problem: two of the top 10 goaltenders in their league and
not sure who to start on any given night. Yes, opponents will feel very
sorry for them. Yeah, sure.

Playing at Ferris State University’s Wink Arena, this season (or against
them at any time) won’t be an easy task with the likes of goalies Vince
Owen (13-8-2, 2.18) and Phil Osaer (8-8-0, 2.95)-call them the “O’s”
(and no Cal Ripken doesn’t play on defense in front of them). But, the
defensive corps for the Bulldogs is strong too, with six defensemen
returning. In other words, don’t expect to put the biscuit in the
basket too many times against the ‘dogs, unless they don’t show up to
the rink one night.

Ferris head coach Bob Daniels, a former goalie himself, maybe sounds a
bit worried, but he’s got to be smiling and salivating on the inside.
If your team has no scoring punch, the Bulldogs will surely leave you
crying.

Coach Daniels feels good about this year’s goaltending and defensive
unit and knows they can go a long way.

“I am truly most confident with our goaltending situation, no question,”
said Daniels, in his 7th year with Ferris State. “We could start either
goalie on any given night and the kids feel confident. Any team with
quality goalies, especially two, will help you finish at or near the top
of the league. If you don’t have it, you’ll finish no better than
sixth.”

But, with two good goalies, what about a controversy? Won’t that
situation unsettle both goalies, kind Read more»

Jared Nightingale part of a talented hockey family

by Derek Berry
on

He’ll hit you. He’ll crunch you. He’ll make you see double. It
shouldn’t be any surprise that Soo Indians defenseman Jared
Nightingale’s favorite player is St. Louis Blues hulking icon Chris
Pronger. It’s precisely who he models his game after.

Not that he needs to anyway. You see, he’s from a talented family of
hockey brothers who have big aspirations – possibly one of the most
talented and toughest trio of hockey-playing brothers to come out of
Michigan since Lansing’s Kelly, Kevin and Kip Miller.

Jared is prepping himself in the North American Hockey League (NAHL)
right now, while brothers Adam and Jason (both of whom also played for
the Soo Indians) currently play in the college ranks at Lake Superior
State University.

Born and raised in Cheboygan, the three brothers were raised in a good,
wholesome, deeply religious family, which has molded them into a group
of fine young men.

Soo Indians head coach Joe Shawhan has seen and coached all three boys
and would love to coach more of them.

“There was definitely a solid, growth environment in their family,” says
Shawhan. “I give their parents so much credit for allowing their kids
to chase their dreams of playing hockey.”

While Jason and Adam have taken their games to the next level, Jared
aspires to do the same.

“My goal is to play Division I hockey,” says the 18-year-old Jared.
“God’s been good to us, especially in the ways our parents raised us,
and it’s leading us all in positive directions.”

Jared says it was an indoor rink in Cheboygan that he playe Read more»

NAHL helped propel current CCHA stars

by Derek Berry
on

Great players come and go in the world of junior and college hockey.
But, sometimes good and gifted players become even better at higher
levels (i.e. college and pro hockey) because of leagues like the North
American Hockey League (NAHL).

Two players who have come through the NAHL only to shine in their first
seasons of college hockey – Ryan Miller of Michigan State and Chris
Gobert of Northern Michigan- also played for the same junior team, the
Soo Indians of the NAHL under General Manager and head coach Joe
Shawhan. And it’s no secret that both were named to the All-CCHA Rookie
Team for ’99-’00 either.

Shawhan raves about players just like Miller and Gobert that he is now
developing, with hopes of similar results for the future.

“With Ryan Miller, we knew right away he was special,” said Shawhan.
“He had to strengthen up a bit because he had a growth spurt (from 5′ 6″
to 6′ 1″) in a short time.”

Shawhan says Miller probably had it in his bloodlines too, being
related to that infamous arsenal of Lansing area Millers – Kelly, Kevin,
and Kip.

“He (Ryan) always talked about making money at the game someday and I
know he will,” says Shawhan. “He’s that talented.”

Nobody knows about that talent more than MSU head coach Ron Mason, who
has coached all of the Millers – and now Ryan, whom he has watched play
since he was 5-years-old.

“I’ve watched him for a long time, watched him mature, grow like a
weed,” says Mason. “He has the mentality to succeed i Read more»