Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Washington’s Potential 2001 NHL Rookies – Forwards

by Rick Davis
on

Last year, Washington’s camp was relatively mellow. More than a few veterans did not play the best hockey they could have, because they were virtually guaranteed roster spots no matter how hard they played. Notable exceptions to this were Jeff Halpern, Ulf Dahlen, and Steve Konowalchuk. The overall lack of fire continued into the regular season, and the Caps went 3-8-6-1 in their first 18 games.

Fortunately for Washington and their fans, the Caps eventually won the Southeast Division in spite of the poor start. However, it is certainly in Washington’s best interests not to have that kind of a start again.

Last year, the Capitals had some things working against them that should not be a problem this year. Multiple holdouts hindered the progress of the team – neither Sergei Gonchar nor Chris Simon attended camp. Brendan Witt was still upset about his arbitration hearing, and Peter Bondra had requested a trade.

This year, Jeff Halpern and Glen Metropolit have not been signed yet, but are expected to sign before camp starts. Halpern attended Washington’s rookie camp even though he doesn’t have a contract, and it’s certainly a possibility that he would attend Washington’s main camp without one as well. His leadership has been exemplary over the last couple of years and it would certainly not hurt his chances to become a future captain. Adam Oates, the current captain, has requested a trade. It’s not known whether he will show up at camp or not.

While Halpern’s contract and Oates’s discontent are certainly of paramount i Read more»

Islanders Training Camp Review

by Bill Bennett
on
Lot’s of things changed with the New York Islanders over the summer, one of
the things that did not change was the amount of games the team will play in the
preseason. The team will play only six games, with the difference
being these games will be played over nine days. (Sept 20-29) Colorado is
the only other team to play as few as six games.

Not a lot of days to give the veterans who will be on the team a chance to
get some time playing together and even less to determine who will fill the few
openings on the roster. Some quick judgements will have to be made by rookie coach Peter Laviolette and his staff. (Greg Cronin, Jacques LaPerriere new goaltending coach Billy Smith)

Like last years training camp (Lake Placid Sept 11th-18th) practices and team scrimages will play a big part in who is going to get the best look in those early exhibiton games. At this time there is no word of the Isles sharing a rookie camp with another organization. Training camp for the Isles will last one week. Many teams will have started their exhibiton schedule while this is going on and have camps that will last only three or four days in some cases.

What will be different is that the Islanders staff after several years of shared affiliates will have the Read more»

The Later Rounds

by Jake Dole
on
Each and every year, the NHL season offers it’s own surprises. It can be a blockbuster trade, a player holding out, a head coach getting fired, or an overachieving team. It is equally important to note that ever so often, a player makes an impact whose name previously seemed unfamiliar. Players like Andreas Dackell, Brian Smolinski, Tomas Holmstrom, Steve Rucchin and Todd Marchant all have something in common. At one point of their careers, their NHL futures were in question. However, at this moment, all of them have successful (although by no means perfect) careers.
Some players get overlooked, whether at the NHL draft, or as a free agent. How many times do we see a career rejuvenated through a trade, or expansion draft? Certain players make their respective teams as grinders and fourth-liners, and eventually make their way up into larger and more serious roles.
Hockey critics like to rank prospects differently. Some like to divide them in half; there are the prospects that are likely to make the NHL, and there are those who probably won’t get a sniff. Using the Rangers as an example, we are likely to see Jamie Lundmark in the big show sometime soon, maybe as early as next year. Where does Layne Ulmer fit in? He’s got the numbers, the finishing ability, but his skating is getting in the way of his pro career. Scouts say he is too slow, pros are harder than juniors, he is too soft… When you hear all the experts pile on these prospects, it almost seems like a youngster cannot shake off that price tag.
Plodding, not skilled e Read more»

The “Big List Week” is Coming Soon!

by Mark Fischel
on

Hockey’s Future is proud to announce the publishing dates for one of the most anticipated features we do here!!! For the past few years, these lists have been met with anticipation, delight, anger, criticisms, shock, disbelief, and congratulations. We fully anticipate those feelings to continue.

The hard work of a collection of our editors have yielded what will be to this day, the most debated and comprehensive Top 50 list we have ever published.

What will make these lists so different from the past ones are some new features to look for this time. We will breaking down the top prospects by 3 different on-ice positions, and this will include some players who won’t make the top 50 but still are quality players in their respective positions. Another new feature will be profiles for each player, the player rankings from the last published Top 50 list, and the “Top Risers & Fallers”.

The lists will be published on the site at approximately 6:00 EST, and so without further ado, here is the schedule for the publishing of the HF Top Prospect lists!

Mon, Sept 10th : Top 10 goalies

Wed, Sept 12th : Top 25 defenseman

Fri, Sept 14th : Top 25 Forwards

After these three lists are posted, we encourage everyone to discuss the rankings on the message boards under the provided headings. Please no fistfights, foul language, general hooliganism, or wagering please when civilly debating your opinions in anticipation of the big list that will be published on….

Monday, September 17th : Top 50 prospects

And here at H Read more»

Blues goaltending pipeline

by Brian Weidler
on

The Last Line Of Defense Is A Good One For The Blues

On the eve of the first training camp of the 21st Century, a number of Blues’ fans have questions about the most important position on the team — the goaltenders.

Almost everyone will agree that the time had come to send the beleaguered Roman Turek packing. And yet, despite acquiring a reliable starter (Fred Brathwaite) in return, there is a large faction of Bluenote backers who remain convinced that, without a world-class goalie, the Blues will play second fiddle to the traditional Western powerhouses yet again. The Doubting Thomases point to the inexperience of Brathwaite and Brent Johnson, and predict doom for the Blues in 2001-02.

While Blues fans may have legitimate concerns about goaltending in the short term, the long-term outlook in goal for the Blues has never looked brighter. Of the eight goaltenders who will wear the ‘Note in various camps this fall, six of them were either drafted or developed as professionals by the Blues. And it all starts with the man they call “Big” Johnson.

Originally drafted 129th overall by Colorado in 1995, Brent Johnson became Blues’ property just prior to the 1997 Entry Draft, when interim GM Ron Caron swung a deal for the big young netminder. A few months later, Johnson began his first season as a pro in Worcester, and split the duty with Frederic Cassivi. Johnson’s numbers in his first season were respectable for a 20-year-old rookie — 42 games played, 14 wins, a 3.19 goals-against average and a save percentage of 89.9%.

The next year, t Read more»

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