Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

The Marc Savard Situation

by David Glaz
on

Flames Forward Marc Savard has seen his entire season become mired in controversy. All seemed to be going well for Savard in Calgary going into the season, but he’s had a dismal year up to this point; he’s had a clash with the system the team plays; disgruntled over being bumped of star player Jarome Iginla’s line, and has constantly quarreled with coach Greg Gilbert. Savard is an offensively gifted player on an offensively starved team, and he should be a tremendous part of the group, but he’s not. Now its up to GM Craig Button to decide whether its worth it to keep Savard and try to resolve the situation, or deal the most marketable of your expendable players to help shore up extremely the poor depth up front.

Four games into the season Savard was kneed by Detroit winger Darren McCarty, and sustained a knee injury that kept him out of the lineup for six weeks. In his absence Iginla was paired with Craig Conroy and the two, along with Roman Turek, carried the team to a 13-2-2 start. When Savard came back, the team started to slump. It was unsure what do with Savard, because of the success Iginla and Conroy had enjoyed.

Eventually, Iginla was primarily kept on Conroy’s line and Savard was forced to play with less talented linemates, and saw his
production drop accordingly. Last year Savard enjoyed a career year, scoring 65 points, but his shortcomings, namely poor defensive play, were overlooked. Savard was a +12 last season, but his lack of commitment to the defensive game really came under scrutiny this year now that he has only 18 points in 33 games. In Read more»

HF’s Interview with St. Michael’s Major Kevin Klein

by Brad Coccimiglio
on

Kevin Klein
Team: Toronto St. Michael’s Majors
Position: Defenseman
Birthdate: Dec. 13, 1984
Hometown: Kitchener, Ontario
Height: 6’1
Weight: 185 lbs

·Was St. Michael’s 2nd round pick in the 2000 OHL draft
·Klein is considered to be a top prospect for the 2003 NHL draft Read more»

Silver hard to accept for Stoll

by Jeff Bromley
on

For every dark cloud, there’s a silver lining, goes the old saying. After a bittersweet silver medal performance at the World Junior Championships three weeks ago, Jarrett Stoll’s silver lining isn’t much compensation for what he considers a dark cloud of losing the gold medal game to Russia. Even being named both WHL player of the week (Jan. 13-19) and a WHL Western Conference All-Star selection was little solace for the still simmering emotions.

Improving on the bronze medal performance a year earlier by Canada in Moscow, the captain of the 2002 national junior squad had the unenviable assignment of accepting the silver for his teammates. As team leader, it was one of the more difficult duties he had to perform. “It’s probably the hardest thing I’ve ever had to deal with in hockey,” said Stoll after arriving back in Cranbrook after a week’s vacation at home in Saskatchewan.

Although an experience of a lifetime and the country’s best result in four years, the second place finish still leaves a bitter taste in Stoll’s mouth. So much so that some three weeks after the end of the tournament the Yorkton native still hadn’t seen the now infamous overhead T.V. shot of the Russian goaltender Serguei Mylnikov purposely pushing the net off it’s moorings with less than twenty seconds remaining as the Canadians buzzed around the net in a wild flurry looking for the tying goal. It’s an offense that should’ve warranted a penalty shot and could’ve turned silver into gold for Canada. “The Russians getting the medal and taunting us the way they did and the way the game ended Read more»

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