Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

<<<<<<< Updated upstream
History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Guelph the right site for Cup

by Jeff Bromley
on

When the Ontario Hockey League Memorial Cup selection committee made their announcement that Guelph would be the OHL city chosen to hold the tournament for junior hockey’s holy grail, the Memorial Cup, it breathed a billow of fresh air into what’s almost surely become just another trademark of the big business of hockey, junior or otherwise. In today’s hockey, money talks. With this announcement however, perhaps not all things are just about the greenbacks.

The OHL, unlike its CHL counterparts, the QMJHL and WHL, select their host city only four and a half months before the tournament, giving the top four teams in each conference the chance to submit a bid. This season only four of those top eight, Ottawa, Erie, P.A., Barrie and Guelph made the decision to apply. Now from all reports, all four cities presented stellar bids and would no doubt be great hosts with all icing competitive clubs vying for the championship. The actual cities making the bids and their adequacies in holding such an event were never questioned. Truth is, the system the OHL has to determine their host is superior if only for the fact that the host club is almost guaranteed to be as good as, or better than, the three champions from the respective leagues. There’s no selling the farm to bulk up on talent for the championship run and the decision is made after the trading deadline so it is a truer reflection of the team’s talent. The flip side may present some nightmarish challenges for the volunteers organizing the tournament but it is a fairer system nonetheless.

The process of choosing host Read more»

Nabokov Loses Out On The Salt Lake Bid

by Jake Dole
on
Late on Wednesday, January 30, 2002, Evgeni Nabokov’s appeal to play for team Russia at the Salt Lake Olympics was denied by the Arbitration court in Laussane, Switzerland.
Nabokov’s eligibility has been in doubt ever since the IIHF disallowed his request to don the Russian jersey. Evgeni was a back-up goaltender with Kazakhstan at the 1994 Olympic games in Lillehammer. However, Nabokov and Russia’s General Manager Vyacheslav Fetisov decided to appeal the decision, challenging IIHF’s guidelines as a result.
The IIHF’s rule stated that players participating with one country when over 18, cannot suit up for another. To Russia’s chagrin, that ruling was made after Nabokov’s stint with Kazakhstan’s Olympic squad.
Nabokov, an All-Star and the NHL’s Calder Trophy winner last year, will monitor Russia’s success in front of the television set, as all the pressure will be placed on the overworked shoulders of Nikolai Khabibulin.

Now What?

The Russians will have to name a third goaltender to accompany Khabibulin and Egor Podomatsky. Montreal Canadiens’ future hopeful and former Superleaguer Vadim Tarasov could be the leading candidate for the position. Veteran Mikhail Shtalenkov and the Anaheim Mighty Ducks prospect Ilya Bryzgalov will also be considered.
No matter which goalie will be picked, Podomatsky (Lokomotiv Yaroslavl) is the clear choice for the back-up role. Enjoying an excellent year in the Russian Superleague, Egor has emerged as a clutch performer and a fan favorite.

Flyers Prospect Stat Update

by Jim Segrest
on

AHL

Maxime Ouellet, Goaltender, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 29 GP, 2.61 GAA, .911 SV%

Pavel Brendl, Right Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 34 GP, 7 G, 16 A, 23 P

Bruno St. Jacques, Defenseman, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 26 GP, 2 G, 8 A, 10 P

Tomas Divisek, Center, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 45 GP, 10 G, 14 A, 24 P

Vaclav Pletka, Left Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 42 GP, 17 G, 16 A, 33 P

Francis Lessard, Defenseman, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 44 GP, 0 G, 5 A, 5 P

Jim Vandermeer, Defenseman, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 45 GP 1 G, 7 A, 8 P

Joe DiPenta, Defenseman, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 47 GP, 0 G, 2 A, 2 P

Jesse Boulerice, Left Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 36 GP, 1 G, 5 A, 6 P

Guillaume Lefebvre, Left Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 50 GP, 14 G, 8 A, 22 P

Dan Peters, Defenseman, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 41 GP, 5 G, 7 A, 12 P

Mike Lephart, Right Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 19 GP, 6 G, 4 A, 10 P

James Chalmers, Center, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 46 GP, 3 G, 8 A, 11 P

Craig Brunel, Right Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 32 GP, 1 G, 1 A, 2 P

Kirby Law, Right Wing, Philadelphia(AHL)
Stats: 50 GP, 14 G, 19 A, 33 P

Read more»

Phantoms’ News and Notes

by Mike Castor
on

There is some news to report on a few prospects and young players on the Flyers. Bob Clarke traded defenseman Jason Beckett and center Peter Hubachek to Nashville for veteran forward Yves Sarault.

This move was done in part to add more veteran leadership to a team that is a serious threat to make a run at the Calder Cup. The Flyer’s were very high on Beckett last season and he split time between the Phantoms and Trenton of the ECHL. This season however he has struggled to take the next step to become a fulltime AHL defenseman. Phantom’s center Peter Hubachek never caught on to the Phantoms and was mostly a healthy scratch after a torrid start with the Flyers in the 2001 preseason.

Neither player was thought to be a challenger for a roster spot with the Flyers anytime soon. With the trading of Beckett, this opens up space for Bruno St. Jacques and Francis Lessard. Bruno St. Jacques continues to draw rave reviews for his all around steady play.

The Flyers also have a great assembly of impressive defensemen that were drafted last year. Last year’s first round pick Jeff Woywitka has scouts impressed with his all around play. Woywitka has worked on being more of a physical presence behind the blue line.

The Flyers are in a great position to evaluate their farm system. Bob Clarke has made the first steps to prepare the organization for this summer‘s entry draft. Maxime Ouellet remains one of the hottest young netminders in the AHL. His workload has lightened since the return of veteran Neil little to the Phantom’s roster.

Several young pl Read more»

The Goon Syndrome

by Jessica Haskin
on

I had the opportunity and privilege of talking with Jeff Crouse and Adam Smallman, two goons of the Bay County Blizzard, the most penalized team in the Continental Elite Hockey League.

The two players are good friends who met when Crouse was traded to the Blizzard after he’d requested a trade from the Downriver Bombers.

“How’d we become friends? Just through the hockey and just hit it off right away” Crouse said.

“But we get along with everyone on the team,” Smallman quickly added.

“Yep, the whole team gets along pretty good,” Crouse agreed.

“Your styles are similar,” I say.

“Oh, yeah!” Smallman replies.

Their style isn’t the finesse play of a Steve Yzerman or Sergei Fedorov, but would come closer to the crashing and banging of a Derian Hatcher or Tie Domi.

It’s the Goon Syndrome.

A goon in this case fits under the description of someone who’s been hired to intimidate the opponents. A player, who isn’t afraid to get his nose dirty, often accused of dirty plays. If they’re on your team you love them, if they’re your opponent you love to hate them.

Smallman, who is not a small man at 6-foot-3, 225 lbs., a native of Elmsdale, Prince Edward Island, has been nicknamed “Moose.”

Crouse hails from Oshawa, Ontario, and stands 6-foot-2 and weighs in at 205 lbs. Crouse’s main nickname is Crouser but is also know as the “Bounty Hunter.”

Crouse and Smallman rank 2nd and 3rd respectively on their team for most penalty minutes. Crouse has a total of 185 penalty min Read more»

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