Brad Phillips

Hometown:

Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-04-04

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (182nd overall), 2007

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.
 

Future

Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

New Coyotes’ Top 20

by Brandon LeBourveau
on
Conducting a Top 20 list of prospects is not an easy thing to do. Everyone has their own opinion on a certain player’s talent and potential, and if you ask 5 people to give you a Top 20 list, I’m willing to bet all 5 would be different. I know not everyone is going to agree with this list, and I respect that. I respect your opinion, and if you feel like expressing it in an e-mail or a comment at the bottom of this article, please feel to do so. I will try to reply to all comments. Well, enough of the gibberish, let’s get right to it: The List.

Read more»

Cipolla Heads North to Winnipeg

by Andrew Bourgeois
on

AHL NEWS

Manitoba Moose have announced that they have purchased the contract of LW/C Jason Cipolla from the Rochester Americans. Cipolla spent the past two seasons with the Amerks but Moose fans may remember him from his two years as a member of the Milwaukee Admirals, where he recorded 111 points in 129 games between 1997 and 1999. Cipolla is the fourth player acquired by the Moose this season, joining defensemen Brian Chapman and Justin Kurtz, along with forward Jimmy Roy.

The Toronto product posted totals of 12 goals and 25 assists for 37 points in 72 games with the Americans last season. He signed with Rochester prior to the 1999-2000 season and was part of the Amerks’ run to the Calder Cup final. Cipolla is known as an individual with good character. On the ice he is feisty and agressive. Off the ice, he was awarded the Americans’ McCulloch Trophy for his work in the community last season.

“Jason Cipolla is a hardworking player that will show up every night,” said Carlyle. “When Vancouver goes through a string of recalls over the course of the season he will be one of the players that we will depend on as a constant variable along with players like Brian Chapman, Justin Kurtz and Jimmy Roy. We expect that he will be able to contribute offensively and will be a positive influence in the dressing room.”

Cipolla will join all the Canucks hopefuls in Burnaby, B.C. when Vancouver opens their training camp on September 11th.

AHL FASTFACTS

In 1996-97 Hamilton Bulldogs Dennis Bonvie set an AHL record when he recorded 522 penalty Read more»

Fulfilling the league’s potential.

by Jake Dole
on
Since 1946, hockey has taken over as the sort of competition which, to this day, familiarizes other nations with Russia and its system of sporting procedure. Until the fall of the Soviet Union, the system was extremely successful(although somewhat inhumane), which was evident with the enjoyed success of the “Sbornaja” clubs for more than 3 decades. Although, the system had its flaws, the secret lay within the strict development of youth to ensure the country’s athletic prosperity and assure consequent triumphs.
With the upcoming winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah, one can only wonder if the nation can realistically compete for gold. Whether or not the problem lies within the apparent shortage of hockey youth, an argument can be made that unlike in the late 80’s or early 90s, Russia can no longer exhibit a punch of youthful energy to its lineup. Ten years ago, the likes of Mogilny, Bure and Fedorov represented the core of the country’s hockey prosperity. However, in 2001 the country is faced with putting together a team either with the millionaire stars who don’t want to be there or with the unproven youngsters who…well, have yet to prove anything. The lackluster development of hockey posterity in the 90’s has resulted in numerous disappointing world championship results for Russia, a tournament which was supposed to showcase more of the country’s budding youth. Although there has been clear improvement with an increase, let alone, the proportion of talent, many problems still plague the junior hockey systems in Russia.
A key problem Read more»

Tim Branham

by Scott McFarlane
on

When the Vancouver Canucks selected Tim Branham with their 3rd pick (93rd overall) in the 2000 NHL entry draft, the Canucks knew that they were drafting a solid, talented defensemen.

Tim Branham

Position: D

Shoots: Left

Height: 6-2

Weight: 185 lbs

Birthdate: 1981-05-05

Hometown: Eagle River, Wisconsin

The 6’2, 185-pound Branham is known more as an offensive defenseman, rather than the typical defensive defensemen. Tim Branham’s skating is one of his more notable skills, along with his big shot. Branham will have more of a realistic chance to make the Canucks within the next 4 years.

The Canucks are deep on defence, with Bryan Allen, Zenith Komarniski and Rene Vydarney all ready to make the next step to the NHL. It leaves very little room for Tim Branham and other defensemen prospects like Bonni, Hay, and Ytfeld to make the team. There are hardly any open spots on the Vancouver Canucks for the next couple years. So many players are trying out for those few spots, only so many can earn those spots. It is going to be tough for the players, but fun for us writers and fans to watch.

Last year Branham played for the Barrie Colts of the OHL.

Tim Branham’s stats

1999-00 Barrie Colts OHL GP 38 G 3 A 16 P 19 PIM 46

2000-01 Barrie Colts OHL GP 68 G 7 A 25 P 32 PIM 77

Tim Branham posted very respectable numbers last season. A nice stat to see was the 77 penalty minutes in 68 games; this shows that he can throw his tall, skinny frame around and doesn’ Read more»

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