Brad Phillips


Farmington Hills Michigan

Currently Playing In:






Eligible for draft:









7th round (182nd overall), 2007


187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D


2005-06: Phillips spent the majority of the year playing for the USA U-17 squad.  Appearing in 38 games, Phillips posted a record of 21-14-3 with a goals against average of 2.39 and a save percentage of .922.  He also recorded one shutout.  He played all but one game at the 2006 World U-17 Hockey Challenge where he led Team USA to a silver medal.  He was named the tournament's top goaltender.  Phillips also appeared in one game with the U-18 squad.  He allowed two goals as he picked up the win.

2006-07: Phillips split the season in nets with Josh Unice.  In 24 games, Phillips posted a record of 15-5-0-2 with a goals against average of 2.33 and a save percentage of .913.  He also had two shutouts. Eleven of his 24 games came against NCAA opponents.  Phillips posted a winning record in these games, finishing with a record of 5-4-1 with a goals against average of 3.18 and a save percentage of .886.  NHL Central Scouting ranked Phillips as the ninth best NA goalie heading into the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.

2007-08: Phillips saw action in five games with the University of Notre Dame. He spent the season backing up Jordan Pearce in goal, and along with junior Tom O’Brien, he gave the Irish one of the top goaltending trios in the country. He went 4-1-0 on the season with a 1.53 goals against average and a .923 save percentage. He recorded one shutout on the season. He made his collegiate debut on Nov. 2 in a 4-1 win over Lake Superior, making 16 saves in the game. His first career shutout came in his third career start, as he made 24 saves in a 7-0 win at Princeton on Dec. 8. He is one of seven former USNTDP alums on the Notre Dame roster along with Pearce, junior Kyle Lawson, fellow sophomores Ian Cole and Teddy Ruth and freshmen Patrick Gaul and Sean Lorenz.

2008-09: Phillips missed the entire season due to a knee injury.

2009-10: Phillips appeared in 10 games as a junior as a back-up to Notre Dame starter Mike Johnson as the Fighting Irish finished ninth in the 12-team CCHA. Phillips was 2-3-3 with 1 shutout and had a 2.47 GAA and .911 save percentage.

2010-11: Phillips played for the Bloomington Prairie Thunder in the CHL, foregoing his senior year at Notre Dame. He appeared in 30 games as a backup to veteran Marco Emond and was 12-7-5 with a 2.38 GAA and .914 save percentage. The Prairie Thunder finished third in the Turner Division and Phillips appeared in three playoff games and was 0-2 with a 3.08 GAA and .894 save percentage.


Phillips attends the University of Notre Dame.

Pirates goaltending preview

by Caitlin LoCascio
At this point, the Pirates’ tentative roster has four goaltenders on it: Corey Hirsch, Sebastien Charpentier, Curtis Cruickshank, and Rastislav Stana. There is no new faces among them, all saw action with the team last season. But who will be the pair that gets chosen is a mystery.

Corey Hirsch joined the Pirates last season, and quickly became a fan favorite. He spent much of the season away on loan, playing in both the IHL and AHL, and was twice named the IHL’s Goaltender of the Week. He is an extremely solid goaltender, and a veteran with over 100 NHL games under his belt. He is extremely adept glove-side, and is not afraid to use it – an attribute far too many AHL goaltenders do not have. And, perhaps most importantly, the rest of the team has confidence in his goaltending and this shows in their play.

Sebastien Charpentier is struggling to overcome illness and injury. Once a fantastic ECHL goalie with incredible amounts of promise, a troubling shoulder, hip, and chronic arthritis have held him back. His concentration has improved tenfold in the past two seasons, and he is capable of a brilliant game. Unfortunately, that is not seen nearly enough. It is hard to pinpoint what he is doing wrong, but even harder to say what it is he is doing right.

Curtis Cruickshank is a mixed bag. His size and agility make for a great combo, but his young age and inexperience are working against him. He made solid progress through the year, but seemed to go downhill after being loaned to the UHL near the end of Read more»

Lindros and prospects

by Evan Andriopoulos

Not to focus on Eric Lindros and the impact this has on the team, the NHL and hockey in general one can sum it up by saying “Sather is taking a huge risk with a possible huge payoff or a fan anticipated loss on investment”. Lindros brings size, some passion and fear, something the Rangers have not had for some time up the middle. The loss of Hlavac, Johnsson and Brendl may or may not hurt the “cause”. Meaning Hlavac probably the most big hearted and talented of the three is coming off knee surgery, the garden variety but surgery anyway. Johnsson a fleet-footed defender can be replaced by Mike Mottau and candidate Filip Novak. Brendl, of the three, the one with the most upside has upset Rangers management since first showing up at camp out of shape which equals in the minds of New York brass “lack of heart”. While it may be years before Brendl makes a splash the movement of these three players atleast opens up some competition for a defense spot, a wing spot (possibly to be occupied by Brett Hull) and perhaps another wing spot (where Brendl may have fit).

Sather told Mike York, learn to play wing or 4th line checking center or you are out of here, regardless of how much heart you have. Manny Malhotra, remember left wing, learn it or leave us. There is not much room at the inn for these guys.

Read more»

Rangers send prospects to Flyers for Lindros

by Brandon LeBourveau
It’s been an on-going saga for the New York Rangers for many years. Dealing away young talent in return for an established veteran, brought in to increase the chances of the team winning the Stanley Cup. We saw Doug Weight dealt to the Edmonton Oilers in return for Esa Tikkanen. We saw Tony Amonte dealt to Chicago in return for Steve Larmer. About 7 years later, what has it brought us? 1 Stanley Cup and 4 consecutive seasons out of the playoffs, while Weight and Amonte are widely viewed as top line players in the NHL. I don’t know where to begin when I wonder of what life would be like if the Rangers held on to Weight and Amonte, among others.

This brings us to June of 2000, when the New York Rangers hired former Edmonton General Manager Glen Sather to run the team. In Edmonton, Sather was known as an excellent GM who built his teams through the draft and trades. He was the one dealing away the veterans for the talented younger players, something that made Rangers’ fans excited. Many believed the days of dealing away our young talent were gone. It was a new, better era for New York. We had one of the best GM’s in the NHL, and one who could acquire young talent and ultimately build the team that way. But we were wrong.

Today, the Rangers traded hotshot prospect Pavel Brendl, the 4th Overall pick in the 1999 Draft, young winger Jan Hlavac, and young defenseman Kim Johnsson, along with a 3rd round pick in 2003 to the Philadelphia Flyers for all-star center Eric Lindros, and a conditional 1st round pick in 2003. As they say, some things never change.

Size does matter for the Lightning

by Jake Dole
Is it any wonder that Rick Dudley stockpiled the Tampa Bay Lightning with size and grit over the past few years? Drafting the big three, Svitov, Polushin and Artyukhin indicated a move to project a larger and meaner Lightning squad for years to come. In the present-day NHL, it seems clear that size does matter, bigger is better, and physical domination is key.
Dudley’s Lightning, already seem stocked on talent. Lecavalier-Richards-Modin line might thrive for years to come. Therefore, skill does not appear to be the problem with this squad as of now. However, there is a clear absence of grit and character. Tampa is a very young squad and the team looked mistake prone and inexperienced last year. Lightning’ defense was awful, mainly because of the apparent lack of physical presence and identity.
Dudley didn’t hide his fascination with big players before the 2001 draft. Even early in spring, he praised Alexander Svitov’s nasty on-ice tactics and the surprising bonus of unlimited offensive potential. One can only imagine his delight when the wildcard Polushin slipped all the way to the second round, right into Dudley’s grasps.
Judging by the abundance of sky scraping bodies on the Lighting’s respective farms, one can only picture the look of Tampa Bay’s depth chart in five years or so. Size, skill, grit galore. Suddenly, all those years of suffering endured by the Tampa fans might come to an end. However, don’t make the mistake of judging the giants of Tampa Bay solely on their size. There is plenty of creativity, talent and goa Read more»

World Junior Cup: Canada-Russia game recap

by Robert Neuhauser
The last game of the World Junior Cup, the Canada-Russia contest, had lots
of future NHL players on both sides. The Canadians and Russians, tied
for the tournament lead before the game were preparing for the contest
which should decide who is better and who will win the whole World
Junior Cup.

Also during the warmup you could see highly talented players. On the
Russian side Nikolai Zherdev wore the C on his jersey for the first
time because Maxim Sheviev wasn’t able to play due to injury. Other
Russian players, mostly forwards, showed glimpses of briliance even
during the warmup. They are alternate captain Vladislav Evseev, Igor
Ignatouchkin, Evegni Isakov or Dmitri Kazionov.

On the Canadian side, Rick Nash, Daniel Paille, Alex Leavitt, Pierre-
Marc Bouchard, Lance Monych and captain Tim Brent were the top
prospects at forward while alternate captain Ian White, Andy Thompson,
Adam Gibson and Kevin Klein were shining at defense. Maxime Daigneault
and Denis Khoudiakov were the starters in goal on their respective

Immediately after the game started it was evident that it’ll be a
high-paced contest with lots of determination and offense. The Canadian
players created the first scoring chance of the game as the Russian
goalie Khoudiakov didn’t make a sure save and Tim Brent could almost
rebound the loose puck. Soon after that Tim had to visit the penalty
box for tripping, but the Canadians didn’t allow any scoring chance
to the Russians.

Tim Brent had his fingers also in the first goal of the game. He received
a pass from Pierre- Read more»

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