Chris Collins

Hometown:

Fairport New York

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1984-06-08

Position:

LW

Eligible for draft:

2002

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

5-8

Acquired:

Free agent, 2006

Weight:

195 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

Collins registered eight assists playing for the U.S. Under-18 Team that played in a four-team tournament in Germany in 2001. He was the second-leading scorer for the 2000 U.S. Under-17 Select Team that won the gold medal at the Four Nations Tournament in the Czech Republic. He scored two goals and two assists for four points.

2001-02: Collins played with the Des Moines Buccaneers of the USHL. He played in 60 games, recording 65 points (26 goals, 39 assists). He led the Buccaneers in scoring, and won the USHL rookie scoring title. 

2002-03: During his freshman year at BC he played in all 39 games, and led all BC Freshman in scoring with 23 points (11 goals, 12 assists). Was named to the 2002-03 Hockey East All-Rookie Team. In Hockey East action he scored 16 points (eight goals, eight assists).

2003-04: As a sophomore, Collins played in 41 games, scoring 19 points (nine goals, 10 assists). Played in 24 Hockey East games, scoring 14 points (seven goals, seven assists). Finished the year with a +/- of +11, and a +/- of +12 in Hockey East games.

2004-05: As a junior, Collins played in 40 games, scoring 17 points (nine goals, eight assists). He played in 24 Hockey East contests, scoring nine points (three goals, six assists). He was a +/- of +7.

2005-06: Collins enjoyed a brilliant senior season. He led the Eagles in goals (30), assists (27), points (57), shots (174), shooting percentage (.172), and short-handed goals (5). He led the nation in points per game with 1.58. His 30 goals were the third most nationally. He was named as one of the ten finalists for the Hobey Baker Award, the award for College Hockey’s best player. 

2006-07: Collins had some conditioning issues when he arrived at training camp and was slow to acclimate to the pro game. He got very little ice time while in Providence, and as a result, he was reassigned to Long Beach where he could get more ice time and experience. Collins finished out his rookie season with 37 points (18 goals, 19 assists) in 51 games.

Talent Analysis
During his final year at Boston College, Collins became one of the most electrifying players to watch. His excellent sense of anticipation and blazing speed made him not only difficult to contain but dangerous in all situations. What Collins lacks in size (height-wise), he more than makes up for with his hard work, tremendously competitive nature and creativity with the puck. He is very smart and possesses outstanding on-ice vision. He has great awareness in being able to spot and get pucks to his teammates on the ice. Collins also does a great job of finding and using to his advantage open spaces on the ice. One area where Collins really excels is in short-handed situations. He is very sound defensively and can often capitalize on the opposition’s turnovers. Collins also is a great leader who leads by example.

DJ Powers contributed this section to the profile.

Future
Collins should spend the the 2007-08 season in Providence

Capitals Look Back – Scott Stevens

by Jeff Charlesworth
on
Watching Scott Stevens raise his second Stanley Cup in five years was extremely painful for long-time Capitals fans. They remember that ten years ago, the Caps let him walk to St. Louis in the first big name – and arguably the largest ever – NHL Free Agent signing. The decision to let Stevens go has been widely criticized, but the Capitals had their reasons at the time. With the power of hindsight, we can look back and try to determine if the Capitals made the right choice.

Scott was the Capitals first round pick in 1982, 5th overall. By that fall, he was already patrolling the blueline in DC and became a force to be reckoned with. In 1990, he was part of a solid Caps defence corps that also featured Rod Langway, Kevin Hatcher and Calle Johansson. Although he was only 26 years old, Scott was an 8-year NHL veteran and 2-time All-Star. The Blues offered to pay him what was considered an obscene amount at that time: $5.1 million over 4 years. In comparison, eight days earlier in Major League Baseball, Jose Canseco and the Oakland Athletics agreed to a 5 year contract worth $23.5 million.
Read more»

Ottawa Senators 2000 Draft Preview

by Nathan Estabrooks
on
Now that the protected list is finalized we can posit the Senator’s draft method. It’s plain and simple. Defense. The Sens once had more blueliners then they did positions; Lance Pitlick takes the money in Florida, Patrick Traverse is traded to Anaheim, Grant Ledyard retires this summer and Igor Kravchuk will be traded if not selected in the expansion draft. Now as a result of these moves Jason York is the only defenseman with more then three years of NHL experience. Players like Rachunek and Salo will play full seasons next year, thus the minor league prospects need to be restocked. The Sens have made a start in this direction with Julien Vauclair and Gavin McLeod. Unless 4 or 5 players are taken there will be a defense famine in a few years.
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Carolina Hurricanes 2000 Entry Draft Preview

by Bill Moesta
on
On June 24 and 25, the NHL will gather in Calgary for the 2000 Entry Draft. Armed with three picks in the first sixty, Carolina General Manager Jim Rutherford and Sheldon Ferguson, Director of Amateur Scouting, will take a dip into the amateur pool to restock the Canes farm system.

The Hurricanes will be picking 14, 44 and 58, in the first two rounds. the first two picks are theirs, while the 58 pick is from Philadelphia, in the Primeau/Brind’Amour-Pelletier trade.

The Canes have hung onto their drafted players the last few years. They learned their lesson the hard way. In 1995, the then Hartford Whalers, traded future Hart and Norris Trophy winner Chris Pronger to the St. Louis Blues. The blossoming of Pronger after leaving the franchise, showed the team to give their young players a chance to develop. In the last two seasons, Carolina has traded just two drafted players. Both of them were defensemen and both were traded to the Philadelphia Flyers. In 1998, the Canes shipped NHL’er Adam Burt and in 1999, the sent QMJHL’er Francis Lessard.
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IHL Rookie Profile – Dan Snyder

by Andrew Bourgeois
on

IHL ROOKIE PROFILE


Dan Snyder
Born: Febuary 23, 1978
Birthplace: Elmira, Ontario
Height: 6-0
Weight: 185
Shoots: Left
Position: Centre

Season Team Lge GP G A Pts PIM

1995-96 Owen-Sound Platers OHL 63 8 17 25 78
1996-97 Owen-Sound Platers OHL 57 17 29 46 96
1997-98 Owen-Sound Platers OHL 46 23 33 56 74
1998-99 Owen-Sound Platers OHL 64 27 67 94 110
1999-00 Orlando Solar Bears IHL 71 12 13 25 123

Signed by the National Hockey League’s (NHL) Atlanta Thrashers as a free
agent in July of 1999. Optioned to Orlando on September 15, 1999.
Led the Owen Sound Platers of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) with 94 points
(27 goals, 67 assists) last season. Was tied for 12th in the league in
scoring. Accumulated 110 penalty minutes (PIM).One of only three OHL players
in the top 25 scoring leaders with over 100 PIM’s. Earned his team’s Most
Valuable Player award.

Speedy whirlwind with good puck skills, Snyder is a smart player with good
acceleration in his stride. He is considered an unselfish player with a good
scoring touch around the net.
Dan is known to have excellent vision on the ice and is an excellent
playmaker. He is known to be a good faceoff man and already has good
defensive awareness. He doesn’t initiate physical play, but will not shy Read more»

A Look at Sharks Goaltending

by Mike Delfino
on

One can not undervalue the importance of goaltending come playoff time. Nearly every team to win the Stanley Cup in the last 10 years has all had great goaltending.

Looking past Steve Shields, the Sharks have 3 young goalies who stand to play a prominent role in the future for the Sharks, however, they all remain very much of question marks. All share a very similar motto (as can most goaltending prospects for that matter). All may turn into solid NHL goalies, and all may turn into nothing more than career minor leaguers.

This year saw the first Sharks drafted goaltender step foot on the ice for the San Jose Sharks–Evgeni (aka John, aka Yevgeni) Nabokov. All other goalies to play for the Sharks were either acquired via trade, free agency or other means. Nabokov was drafted in the 9th round, with the 219th overall pick in 1994.

In limited action in San Jose, Nabokov did exactly what was asked of him. In his first start he shutout Colorado in a 0-0 tie. In 11 appearances, he was 2-2-1, a save percentage of .910, with a 2.17 GAA. In only one game did he looked out of place. At the very least, Nabokov may have proved this year that he is a reliable backup. Read more»