Colin McDonald

Colin McDonald

Hometown:

Wethersfield Connecticut

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1984-09-30

Position:

RW

Eligible for draft:

2003

Shoots:

Right

Drafted:

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

2nd round (51st overall), 2003

Weight:

203 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2002-03: Played for the New England Coyotes of the EJHL Led the EJHL in scoring in with 58 points (28 goals, 30 assists) Earned EJHL Offensive Player of the Year Award and league MVP honors and was also named the MVP of the Top Prospects Tournament in 2002. Earned Hockey Night In Boston Junior Player of the Year.

McDonald Interview July 2003: http://www.hockeysfuture.com/article.php?sid=6180&mode=threaded&order=0

2003-04: Selected to the U.S. National Junior Team Evaluation Camp (August 2003) but did not make WJC team.  Named to the Hockey East All-Rookie Team.

2004-05: His sophomore season with the Friars was interrupted by a knee injury but before that occurred he was a point per game player and the go-to guy in Providence’s line up. Upon his return, Providence experienced a late season run after not winning a game in his absence. In the playoffs, McDonald played center.

2005-06: Statistically his best college year, new head coach Tim Army allowed the club to open up more offensively which played to McDonald’s strengths.  Appeared at Edmonton’s prospect camp in the middle of June.

2006-07: In his final season with Providence College, McDonald tallied 13 goals and 17 points in 36 games. He finished with 43 goals and 77 points in 135 games as a Friar.

July 2007 Audio Interview

2007-08: This marked McDonald’s first season of professional hockey, which he spent with the Springfield Falcons (AHL). In 73 games, he recorded 12 goals and 23 points, along with 46 minutes in penalties.

Talent Analysis

McDonald has good physical skills and a deadly accurate shot but he needs to get himself into better position to use the shot more effectively. He is strong and aggressive down low and in the corners, goes hard to the net and brings a positive work ethic and energy to the table.  However, he wasn’t supposed to be an energy player as a pro, he’s supposed to be a scorer.  Another high character person, well-spoken and charismatic personality; very Jarret Stoll-like.

Future
A critical year coming up for McDonald as it’s the last of his entry-level contract. He was a jack-of-all-trades for the Falcons last season but has to establish himself as a top-six player in the AHL this year.  


Jillson on cusp of making it big

by Jake Dole
on
It’s time to make something clear: Jeff Jillson is a legitimate Calder candidate this year. After signing a contract with the San Jose Sharks in May, 2001, Jillson skipped the senior college year in Michigan to officially turn pro. However, joining a blueline that includes Marcus Ragnarsson, Mike Rathje, Brad Stuart, Bryan Marchment, Scott Hannan and Gary Suter will not be an easy assignment. Jeff will have to show a lot of determination at camp to earn serious playing time come regular season.
But if you ask Jeff Jillson, he’ll tell you that he will not despair. Throughout his career, he has played through numerous obstacles and difficulties. Although the NHL is not at all like college, Jillson will demonstrate as much effort and endurance as he does on any ice surface. At the age of 21, he still has weaknesses and will be expected to show more consistency than in the past, but Jeff’s decision to remain in college for a sophomore year turned out to be crucial. Despite a disappointing showing for the United States at the U-20 World Junior Championships, many would agree that Jillson took a major step ahead in his development.
Jillson was first noticed as a high schooler, playing for Mount Saint Charles in Woonsocket, Main; the same team that had won 21 consecutive state titles, which contributed to the pressure already on Jeff’s shoulders. Needless to say, Jillson did not disappoint; he dominated at the high school level, and was a three-time all-state honoree. In addition, he earned the Sports Illustrated/Old Spice Athlete of the Month h Read more»

The New Finn in the Island Waters: Marko Tuomainen

by Joe Muccia
on

Beginning in 1989, Marko played 2 years with his hometown team, KalPa Kuopio of the Finnish Elite League. Originally a 9th round draft pick of the Edmonton Oilers in 1992, Marko then moved to North America to attend Clarkson University. In four years at Clarkson, Marko accumulated 190 points in 135 games. In 1994-95, Marko was summoned to
Edmonton for a four game cup of coffee. Although he went pointless, he did show excellent defensive awareness, finishing the stint with an even plus/minus. Later in 1995, he reported to the Oilers farm team, the Cape-Breton Oilers and the year after to the Hamilton Bulldogs, all the
while posting solid numbers.

Expecting more scoring from him, the Oilers chose not to renew Marko’s entry-level contract after the 1997 season. Marko chose to return to Finland and HIFK Helsinki of the Finnish Elite League. Impressed with his defensive skills, Helsinki assigned Marko to a
checking role in which he excelled. Even though he was used in a
defensive role, he still managed to tally 50 points in 94 games over a
two-year period. Not bad for a guy that was supposed to shadow the
oppositions top players.

Early in 1999 the Los Angeles Kings, impressed with Marko’s
well-rounded game, signed him to a free agent contract through the 2001
season. Marko ended up playing right wing on the Kings third and fourth
lines. He played 63 games, logging quality minutes on the top PK unit
in addition to his regular shifts (he finished with 17 points, scoring
both on the PP and PK). In 2000, due to the Kings depth at forward
( Read more»

HF’s interview with Oliver Jonas

by Oliver Janz
on





Mit welchem Mitspieler des Eishockeyteams der Harvard University hast Du Dich am besten verstanden

One of the candidates for the goalie position at the Olympic games in Germany’s national team, Oliver Jonas, the ECAC Goalie of the Year 2001, taking the time to answer questions from Hockey’s Future. Germany’s HF Editor OJ (Oliver Janz) talked with Goalie OJ (Oliver Jonas) about his first steps, the time in north america, the olympic games 2002 and many many more. To learn to know more about Jonas

click here for his profile, to read more about his chances to be named to the Olympic roster click here.


Picture: Oliver Jonas, the number one with the #1 on his Harvard jersey.

HF: Hello Oliver Jonas, how do you feel and what are you doing in Germany right now?

OJ: Thanks, i’m feeling excell Read more»

2001-02 Season Previews: From Smith to Bell.

by Kirk Pedersen
on

Hello, and welcome to my third installment in a four-part series of season previews for the Vancouver Canucks and their youngsters. This week I will take a look at the possibilities this season for: 2000 First-rounder Nathan Smith, 1996 First-rounder Josh Holden, 1996 Third-rounder Zenith Komarniski, and 2000 Third-rounder Thatcher Bell.

I’m not completely finished updating all of the site’s profiles, so please bear with me while I do so, as my previous ones are very poor in quality, and will be fixed in the very near future. (I just thought I’d add that in, for those of you who are growing frustrated with my profiles of players.)

I’m ready to start exploring, join me, won’t you?

The first player I will be talking about this week is a former Sherwood Park (Alberta) Midget player by the name of Nathan Smith. Nathan Smith was the Canucks first selection in the 2000 Draft. (23rd Overall) The pick was obtained from the Florida Panthers in the now-infamous Pavel Bure deal/fiasco of 1998-99. He put up some good numbers for Swift Current last season, scoring 90 points, (28g, 62a) in 67 games. However, he is not thought to be much of a scorer at the NHL-level.

A former first-round draft pick in junior by the Swift Current Broncos, when he was first drafted, I’ll admit that I had little knowledge of the Strathcona, Alberta native. I had known that he wasn’t too much of a scorer, and that he’d throw his hat in to the now-impressive group of young centres we had, which included the likes of Artem Chubarov, Mike Brown, and Josh Holden, not to mention Henri Read more»

Tarasov a hybrid goalie

by Chris Boucher
on
Nine days of intense workouts are beginning to pay off for the players here at the Canadiens’ prospect development camp. Drills are being run with much more precision. Passes are moving from tape to tape, scorers are starting to score, and playmakers are making the plays that are only made after successive intense on-ice workouts.

Tarasov / Belanger

Vadim Tarasov (7th round, 1999) is working hard to stop every shot he faces. He’s eager to impress, and his work ethic has been second to none. He and Luc Belanger (recently signed by the Citadelles) are far and above the best goalies in camp. While both have been effective, their styles of play represent what some people consider competing styles.

Tarasov is more of a hybrid goalie. Utilizing whatever style he deems necessary depending on the situation. He’s a reaction goalie; relying on reflexes to stop to the puck, and solid skating to remain square to the shooter. This style of play often contributes to inconsistency. It forces the goalie to rely too often on his reflexes. This puts pressure on the goalie’s ability to remain focused. Any drop in focus usually results in bad goals. Tarasov’s style of play is the likely reason for his past inconsistencies. He has a reputation of being a goalie who plays great when he’s on, but plays terrible when he’s not. In fact, there was a period last season when his somewhat erratic play was enough for him to fall out of favour with his coach. Between October 26th and November 11th Tarasov played in only two of his team’s nine games. His save percent Read more»

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