Colin McDonald

Colin McDonald

Hometown:

Wethersfield Connecticut

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1984-09-30

Position:

RW

Eligible for draft:

2003

Shoots:

Right

Drafted:

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

2nd round (51st overall), 2003

Weight:

203 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2002-03: Played for the New England Coyotes of the EJHL Led the EJHL in scoring in with 58 points (28 goals, 30 assists) Earned EJHL Offensive Player of the Year Award and league MVP honors and was also named the MVP of the Top Prospects Tournament in 2002. Earned Hockey Night In Boston Junior Player of the Year.

McDonald Interview July 2003: http://www.hockeysfuture.com/article.php?sid=6180&mode=threaded&order=0

2003-04: Selected to the U.S. National Junior Team Evaluation Camp (August 2003) but did not make WJC team.  Named to the Hockey East All-Rookie Team.

2004-05: His sophomore season with the Friars was interrupted by a knee injury but before that occurred he was a point per game player and the go-to guy in Providence’s line up. Upon his return, Providence experienced a late season run after not winning a game in his absence. In the playoffs, McDonald played center.

2005-06: Statistically his best college year, new head coach Tim Army allowed the club to open up more offensively which played to McDonald’s strengths.  Appeared at Edmonton’s prospect camp in the middle of June.

2006-07: In his final season with Providence College, McDonald tallied 13 goals and 17 points in 36 games. He finished with 43 goals and 77 points in 135 games as a Friar.

July 2007 Audio Interview

2007-08: This marked McDonald’s first season of professional hockey, which he spent with the Springfield Falcons (AHL). In 73 games, he recorded 12 goals and 23 points, along with 46 minutes in penalties.

Talent Analysis

McDonald has good physical skills and a deadly accurate shot but he needs to get himself into better position to use the shot more effectively. He is strong and aggressive down low and in the corners, goes hard to the net and brings a positive work ethic and energy to the table.  However, he wasn’t supposed to be an energy player as a pro, he’s supposed to be a scorer.  Another high character person, well-spoken and charismatic personality; very Jarret Stoll-like.

Future
A critical year coming up for McDonald as it’s the last of his entry-level contract. He was a jack-of-all-trades for the Falcons last season but has to establish himself as a top-six player in the AHL this year.  


Chicago Pairs Up With Thrashers

by Andrew Bourgeois
on

AHL NEWS

The Chicago Wolves begin play in a new league and have a new NHL affiliation for next season.

They were one of six teams that moved to the American Hockey League from the International Hockey League, which officially folded. The Wolves confirmed they will be an affiliate of the NHL’s Atlanta Thrashers.

At least three key players from the Wolves’ IHL days will remain. Right wing Rob Brown, defenseman Bob Nardella and left wing and captain Steve Maltais signed contracts for next season.

The Wolves will operate under new rules when the AHL begins its 67th season in October. The AHL allows a team to dress only seven players who have played more than 260 professional games.

“That’ll be a huge change,” said Brown, an 11-year NHL veteran who has played three seasons with the Wolves. “We’ll get a lot of young kids who are just starting out. They will energize us.”

Wolves chairman Don Levin long has been against a full affiliation with an NHL club, but the AHL requires it. Last season the Wolves had a partial affiliation with the New York Islanders but also took players on loan from six other NHL teams.

“I consider it a full affiliation when [the NHL club] unloads a truck and brings in all the players and coaches,” Levin said. “I’m still against that. But we still have our own general manager [Kevin Cheveldayoff] and our own coach [John Anderson].”

Don Waddell, the Thrashers’ general manager, said he and Cheveldayoff will work together to determine the Wolves’ roster.

“This cou Read more»

Matt Kinch and Layne Ulmer to be signed?

by Brandon LeBourveau
on

According to John Dellapina of the New York Daily News, defenseman Matt Kinch and forward Layne Ulmer are both close to signing with the New York Rangers. The signings could be announced as early as today

Matt Kinch is a small, mobile defenseman with solid offensive ability. He played with Pavel Brendl in Calgary of the Western Hockey League, and he would add more depth to our young defense. Although he may not have the ability to play in the NHL, the Rangers would like to develop him in Hartford and hope one day he could wear the Broadway blue. Kinch was drafted in the 5th round in ’99 by the Buffalo Sabres, but failed to come to terms with the team.

As for Layne Ulmer, he has been an offensive force in the WHL for the last couple of years. Over the last 3 seasons, he has scored more goals than anyone else in the WHL, besides Pavel Brendl. Drafted in the 7th round of the ’99 draft by the Ottawa Senators, Ulmer was not signed by the Senators as they felt he would not be a future NHLer.

Another Affiliate for Tampa Bay

by Megan Sexton
on

The Tampa Bay Lightning has entered into a one-year affiliation agreement with the Pensacola Ice Pilots of the East Coast Hockey League.

Less than a month ago the Lightning signed an affiliation agreement with the Springfield Falcons of the American Hockey League. The Lightning are expected to supply Springfield with ten players, as will Phoenix, who shares the affiliation. They will send an unspecified number to Pensacola.

“There are several reasons why we are very happy to be entering into this agreement with the Pensacola Ice Pilots,” General Manager Rick Dudley said.“The first is that I have a great deal of respect for new Ice Pilots head coach Todd Gordon and I was very pleased by the way he’s treated our young players in the past.”

“Additionally, the Ice Pilots are a first-class operation and one of the premiere franchises in the ECHL. Finally, the geography of the relationships is good for us, as it will afford us the opportunity to see our players on a regular basis.”

Tampa Bay was previously affiliated with the Johnstown Chiefs of the ECHL and Detroit Vipers of the IHL.

Overagers in the NHL Draft

by Mark Schwarz
on
The NHL Entry Draft is an event which is, first and foremost, about the future. Teams are attempting to bolster their organizational depth and set their organizations on a course which should keep them competitive into the next decade and beyond. The stars of the day are young players who won’t impress themselves into the minds of casual hockey fans for years, if at all. Despite that, winning now will always be the primary issue in the eyes of NHL General Managers, and after the TV cameras are shut off and the National Car Rental Center in Miami begins to empty, teams will have an opportunity to address their current rosters by delving into the ranks of European players they’ve ignored in the past. Players initially deemed too small, too slow, or lacking the skill to succeed in North America continue to hone their skills in their respective domestic leagues, and every year a substantial group will advance to the point at which they’ll merit a draft selection and receive chance to prove themselves in the NHL.

It wasn’t always this way – the top European players were drafted into NHL organizations as teenagers, and those who were passed over would be extremely unlikely ever to get another chance. However, as the NHL reached the mid-1990s, this suddenly began to change. The calibre of the top European leagues was continuing to rise while the pace of the NHL was dropping due to expansion and a diluted talent pool so the gap between the level of play on the two continents narrowed like never before. Those teams on the cutting edge who came to this realization fir Read more»

Flyers past drafts

by Bill Meltzer
on

Projecting the future is, at best, a tricky proposition. That is especially true when the future you are trying to predict is that of teenage hockey player. There are so many variables at work that there are bound to be more misses than hits, even in the early stages of the NHL draft. Predicting the future, however, is exactly what NHL scouts are paid to do and there are certain franchises that seem to regularly come up with players who go on to become contributors at the NHL level, while other organizations seem to come up empty year after year.

There are generally two components to a team’s drafting philosophy. The first is whether they try to fill a positional need or whether they go for what they think is the best player available at that point, regardless of his position. The second facet is the order in which teams rank the following criteria when assessing a potential draftee’s upside: size and strength (either current or “projected”, i.e., after a young player’s frame fills out); skating ability; level of competition; offensive statistics; and reports on the player’s coachability.

A team’s drafting record is often credited to (or blamed upon, as the case may be) the organization’s general manager. Although they rarely have the opportunity to scout the players directly, the GMs are the ones who have the final say and the ones who decide which of their scouts’ recommendations to trust when there is not a concensus on a pick. It is also the GMs who have selected many of the scouts in the first place, although there are usually carryover scouts from previo Read more»

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