Erik Kallgren

Hometown:

Lidingo Sweden

Currently Playing In:

Europe

Birthday:

1996-10-14

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2015

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2015

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

7th round (183rd overall), 2015

Weight:

190 lbs.

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History

2011-12: Erik Kallgren appeared in two games for Nacka HK in Sweden’s top U16 league and played for Stockholm 1 in the TV-Pucken tournament for high school players. He had a 2.89 goals against and .895 save percentage with Nacka and stopped 15 of 17 shots in two periods of action in his only game for Stockholm 1. 

2012-13: Kallgren moved from Nacka to Linkoping — appearing in two SuperElit games with the club’s U20 team and sharing the goaltending duties for the Linkoping U18 team with Oliver Kallbom. He was 0-2 with a 2.46 goals against and .895 save percentage for the Linkoping U20 team. After posting a 1.73 goals against and .926 save percentage in 11 qualifier games, Kallgren was 4-1 with 2 shutouts and had a 2.86 goals against and .899 save percentage as Linkoping finished first in U18 South Division play. He did not see any action in the playoffs as Kallbom started both games in the two-game series with Djurgardens.

2013-14: Kallgren appeared in three SuperElit games for Linkoping, including one playoff game, and handled the bulk of the goaltending for the Linkoping U18 team in his second season with the club. He was 1-1 with a 3.53 goals against and .870 save percentage during the SuperElit regular season. Kallgren stopped 23 of 28 shots in 47 minutes of action in his only playoff appearance, relieving Oliver Kallbom 11 minutes into the first period with Linkoping trailing Sodertalje 3-0 in an eventual 8-6 loss. Kallgren had a 1.78 goals against and .929 save percentage in 14 qualifier games for the Linkopings U18 team. He was 7-4 with 1 shutout and had a 2.71 goals against and .913 save percentage in 11 regular season games. Linkoping finished second in the South Division. Linkoping reached the finals in the playoffs, falling 4-3 to MODO in the championship game. Kallgren was 3-2 with a 2.00 goals against and .924 save percentage in five playoff games. 

2014-15: Kallgren made his pro hockey debut in Sweden, playing three games on loan to IK Oskarshamn in Allsvenskan, the Swedish second league. He was a workhorse for the bronze medal-winning Linkoping U20 team and represented Sweden in international play for the first time, skating for the U19 team. He was 2-1 with a 2.49 goals against and .897 save percentage for IK Oskarshamn. Kallgren was the top goalie in the U20 South Division, finishing 16-3 with 3 shutouts and posting a 1.67 goals against and .936 save percentage as Linkoping finished first in divisional play. The club also dominated Top 10 play, edging MODO for the top spot. Kallgren appeared in 15 games and was 11-4 with 3 shutouts, sporting a 1.86 goals against and .935 save percentage. Linkoping reached the playoff semifinals before falling to Frolunda, topping Rogle BK, 5-3, in the third-place game. Kallgren was 5-2 in seven playoff games with a 2.52 goals against and .920 save percentage. In two games with the Sweden U19 team he had a 1.44 goals against and .947 save percentage. Not listed amongst the 10 international goaltenders in the Central Scouting final rankings, he was selected by Arizona in the seventh round (183rd overall) in the 2015 NHL Draft. 

Talent Analysis

Using the classic butterfly style, Kallgren has come up through Linkopings junior system and performed well thanks to his ability to move laterally and react to unconfortable scoring opportunities. He’s very agile in net, but lacks technical control to maintain consistency on a nightly basis.

Future
Kallgren was signed by SHL team Linkoping for next season, but was loaned out to IK Oskarshamn of the Allsvenskan where he will continue his development.

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