Logan Pyett

Hometown:

Regina Saskatchewan

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1988-05-26

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2006

Shoots:

Right

Drafted:

2006

Height:

5-10

Acquired:

7th round (212th overall), 2006

Weight:

199 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

Logan Pyett, the last Detroit Red Wings pick in the 2006 NHL Entry Draft, is continuing his solid offensive contribution in the WHL.

2006-07: Pyett has always been known for his offensive play and numbers, but this season he worked hard on improving the defensive aspects of the game. He was a go-to guy with the Regina Pats of the WHL and was among the league leaders in defensive scoring.

2007-08: In his fourth junior season, Pyett scored 20 goals, 34 assists for 54 points in 62 games for the Regina Pats. He added 1 goal, 3 assists in 6 playoff games.

2008-09: Pyett's first pro season was spent with Grand Rapids in the AHL. The defender scored 3 goals and 11 assists for 14 points in 61 games. He was held scoreless in 1 postseason game.

2009-10: Pyett was the only Griffins player to appear in all 80 games, scoring 9 goals, 21 assists for 30 points.

2010-11: Appeared in 74 games for Grand Rapids, but saw his production slip, scoring 9 goals and 13 assists for 22 points.

2011-12: Pyett skated in 73 AHL games for Grand Rapids in his fourth season in the Detroit organization. Part of a defense group that featured veterans Doug Janik and Garnet Exelby, he scored 2 goals with 25 assists and was minus-one with 54 penalty minutes. The Griffins missed the playoffs after finishing fourth in the North Division. Pyett was signed to a one-year contract by the Rangers as an unrestricted free agent in July, 2012.

 

Talent Analysis

Drafted as a crafty, puck-moving defenseman.  He’s small and a bit weak in his own end, but thanks to his hockey sense and vision he seems to position himself very well both offensively and defensively in order to stay out of trouble.

 

Future

Pyett has some tools to make it to the pro ranks (hockey sense, passing, mobility), but he’ll need to add strength and improve his play in his own end. His physical play and positioning need development.