Mason McDonald
Image: QMJHL

Mason McDonald

Hometown:

Halifax Nova Scotia

Currently Playing In:

CHL

Birthday:

1996-04-23

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2014

Catches:

Right

Drafted:

2014

Height:

6-3

Acquired:

2nd round (34th overall), 2014

Weight:

181 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2010-11: Mason McDonald played goal for the Halifax ACCEL Hawks major bantam team that advanced to the Nova Scotia provincial tournament.

2011-12: McDonald played for the Nova Scotia midget AAA champion Halifax Titans. He had a 2.01 goals against and .916 save percentage in 20 regular season games and had a 2.03 goals against and .932 save percentage in six playoff games. Halifax finished third in the Atlantic Regional tournament as Moncton earned the right to compete in the Telus Cup. McDonald was selected by Acadie-Bathurst in the second round (20th overall) of the 2012 QMJHL Entry Draft.

2012-13: McDonald appeared in 26 QMJHL games with Acadie-Bathurst as a 16-year-old and played for Canada Atlantic in the 2013 U17 World Hockey Challenge. He was 6-8-3 with 1 shutout and had a 4.72 goals against and .885 save percentage in QMJHL play. The Titan finished fourth in the Maritimes Division and lost to Blainville-Boisbriand in a five-game first round playoff series. McDonald played one period as a backup to Jacob Brennan in the playoffs; stopping 12 of 13 shots. In four games at the WHC he finished with a 5.34 goals against and .870 save percentage for Canada Atlantic.

2013-14: McDonald played for Canada’s U18 team in the Ivan Hlinka Memorial and World Junior Championship tournaments. He began his second QMJHL season with Acadie-Bathurst before being acquired by Charlottetown in exchange for three draft picks at the end of December. In 29 regular season games between the two teams he was 8-15-3 with a 3.44 goals against and .900 save percentage. Charlottetown reached the playoffs despite winning 21 of 68 regular season games and was swept by Halifax in a first round series. McDonald started all four games and had a 6.58 goals against and .860 save percentage. He did not appear in any games for Canada’s gold medal squad as a backup to Julio Billia at the Ivan Hlinka tournament but was 4-2 with a 1.94 goals against and .930 save percentage in six games for the bronze medal squad at the WJC. McDonald was selected to play for Team Orr in the 2014 CHL/NHL Top Prospects Game. He was ranked second amongst North American goalies in the Central Scouting final rankings and was selected by Calgary in the second round (34th overall) in the 2014 NHL Draft.

Talent Analysis

McDonald is a battler between the pipes who never gives up on the puck and makes the most of his size and athleticism. Though he has frequently found himself peppered with shots, the netminder is unflappable under pressure. Pairing a big frame with great mobility in the crease gives McDonald the foundation to be a special prospect.

Future

McDonald attended his first training camp with the Flames before being returned to Charlottetown at the start of the 2014-15 season. The Islanders are much-improved and McDonald has been a workhorse in net; among the league leaders in wins, goals against and save percentage. The first goalie selected in the 2014 NHL Draft, McDonald is still fairly early in the development process but his physical attributes and technical skills suggest he can be an elite netminder one day.

McDonald, Fucale the upper tier among NHL-drafted QMJHL goaltenders

by Chris Roberts
on

Zach Fucale - Team Canada - IIHF 2015 World Junior Tournament

Photo: Quebec Remparts goaltender and Montreal Canadiens prospect Zach Fucale was the starter in 5 of 7 games for the gold medal-winning Team Canada squad at the 2015 World Junior Championship (courtesy of Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

There are just six NHL-drafted goaltenders playing in the QMJHL this season, a relatively low number for the league once known for producing some of the top goaltenders in the NHL. At most, there is three netminders with some combination of pedigree and talent, while the others are unlikely to advance far in pro hockey. Read more»

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