Mike Williamson
Image: AJHL

Mike Williamson

Hometown:

Leduc Alberta

Currently Playing In:

NCAA

Birthday:

1993-09-05

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2011

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2013

Height:

6-2

Acquired:

6th round (175th overall), 2013

Weight:

187 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2009-10: Mike Williamson made his debut in junior A hockey, playing four games with the Drayton Valley Thunder in the Alberta Junior Hockey League ,and played for the Schwab GM Oil Kings midget AAA team in his hometown of Leduc. Williamson had no points or penalty minutes with the Thunder. He scored 7 goals with 3 assists and had 72 penalty minutes in 31 games with the Oil Kings. Schwab GM reached the Dodge Division Finals after finishing third in the regular season. Williamson had 3 assists and 8 penalty minutes in 10 playoff games.

2010-11: Williamson appeared in one AJHL game with the Spruce Grove Saints and returned to the Oil Kings for his second season in midget AAA hockey. He had no points nor penalty minutes for the Saints. He scored 6 goals with 13 assists and had 70 penalty minutes in 32 games during the regular season with the Oil Kings. Leduc was third in the Dodge Division and reached the league championship series against Chrysler Division champion Red Deer. Williamson scored 3 goals with 1 assist in 15 playoff games and had 33 penalty minutes.

2011-12: Williamson played in 41 of 60 games for Spruce Grove in his first full AJHL season. He scored 9 goals with 9 assists and had 73 penalty minutes. Spruce Grove finished first in the North Division. The defending AJHL champions, the Saints lost to Fort McMurray in the playoff semifinals. Williamson scored 4 goals with 2 assist and had 14 penalty minutes in 11 playoff games.

2012-13: Williamson played 23 games for Spruce Grove – missing a significant portion of the season due to an “upper body” injury. He scored 1 goal with 10 assists and had 35 penalty minutes. Spruce Grove finished first in the North Division and lost to the South Division champion Brooks Bandits in the playoff finals. Williamson scored 1 goal with 3 assists and had 21 penalty minutes in 15 playoff games. In January he committed to playing college hockey at Penn State in 2013-14. He was ranked 183rd amongst North American skaters in Central Scouting’s final rankings and was selected by Vancouver in the sixth round (175th overall).

2013-14: Williamson skated in 27 games for Penn State University as a freshman. He scored 2 goals with 4 assists and was -4 with 38 penalty minutes. Penn State, playing in its second season of varsity hockey, finished last in the six-team Big 10 Hockey Conference in the league’s first season. The Nittany Lions defeated Michigan 2-1 in double overtime in a conference quarterfinal game before falling to Wisconsin, 2-1, in the Big 10 semifinals. 

Talent Analysis

Williamson utilizes his large frame well, and does a good job closing the gap on his opponents. If he earns an NHL job, his strong slap shot might be the ticket that gets him in. He is a fairly good skater but could make better use of his teammates while breaking out of his own zone.

Future

Williamson has been hampered by injury in his sophomore season at Penn State University but has played well when healthy. The Nittany Lions are much-improved in 2014-15, finishing fourth in the Big Ten Hockey Conference regular season and posting a winning record at the Division I level for the first time. In terms of his future prospects, Williamson will likely use the final two seasons of his college eligibility before turning professional. His size and skating ability suggests he can be an effective two-way skating defenseman one day.

Vancouver Canucks possess limited prospect depth in NCAA hockey and Euro leagues

by Peter Prohaska
on
Patrick McNally - Vancouver Canucks

Photo: Vancouver Canucks prospect Patrick McNally has been one of college hockey’s best defensemen when healthy. (courtesy of Zach Bolinger/Icon Sportswire)

Vancouver’s prospect pool is largely a professional group this season. Though the Canucks have looked to the United States college path as a developmental course with great success in the past (Ryan Kesler, Cory Schneider, R.J. Umberger, Adrian Aucoin), the last significant draft selection was 2009’s first round pick used on Jordan Schroeder, who disappointed as a Canuck. Boston College’s Thatcher Demko will look to reverse that trend.

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