Ondrej Roman
www.whl.ca

Ondrej Roman

Hometown:

Ostrava-Poruba Czech Republic

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-02-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2007

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

Trade with Dallas, 2012

Weight:

165 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

After a terrific year in the Czech junior league, Roman arrived in North America via the 2006 CHL import draft, in which he was selected fifth overall by the Spokane Chiefs. The native of Ostrava, Czech Republic posted modest numbers in his rookie campaign, to the tune of 48 points in 70 games, good for fifth on the club. He saw some time on the power play, where he scored three of his four goals, and was bounced around the lines in even strength situations.

2007-08: Roman built off of his rookie season for Spokane (WHL).  He upped his plentiful amount of assists to 46, which is good for second on the team, and started finding his shot, to the tune of 15 goals (up from four).  Roman had a tremendous playoffs as he helped lead the Chiefs to a Memorial Cup championship; he led the club in assists (11) and points (20) in 21 games.

2008-09: Roman split time between the Spokane Chiefs(WHL) and HC Vitkovice of the Czech league. In 32 games in the WHL, Roman scored 10 goals and 22 assists. He also played in 12 playoff games, scoring once and adding 4 assists. Back home, Roman scored 3 goals and added 6 assists in 26 games with the Men’s club. He picked up 4 points in 4 games with their U20 Club.

2009-10: Roman stayed in the Czech Republic, splitting time between three clubs. He played in 10 games with HC Vitkovice’s U20 squad, scoring 9 goals and adding 17 assists in just 10 games. He moved up to HC Vitkovice’s main squad, picking up just 3 points in 26 games. He was loaned to HC Havirov, where he played in the second division. He scored 1 goals and added 6 assists in 11 games with his new club.

2010-11: Hopping from one side of the pond to the other every year is probably not what Ondrej Roman had in mind, but he finally landed in the AHL in 2010-11.  The Czech import played in 72 games, registering 14 assists and 22 points in what was a fairly mundane season for Roman.  He played up and down in the lineup and was sometimes used as a winger as opposed to center.  He didn’t provide the offensive spark for the defensive-minded team and his more-technical/less-physical style saw him scratched throughout most of Texas’ abbreviated playoffs.

Talent Analysis

Quick playmaking forward (can play center and wing) with slick hands.  Not the most beautiful skater in the world but he can move in quick bursts.  Smooth playmaker with very good vision.  Reticent shooter that prefers the pretty play to the shot.  Decent in the dot and has shown flashes of quality defensive play.  Not a very physical player and his size prevents him from penetrating high traffic areas with regularity.

Future

Will return to the AHL in 2011-12.  Roman was dealt to the Florida Panthers in exchange for Andelo Esposito.  

Potential: Longshot 2nd/3rd line tweener playmaking forward, like a less talented version of Ladislav Nagy (in his last NHL seasons).

Fantasy Hockey: Centers 2001-2002

by Drew Bennett
on

1. Peter Forsberg- (Avalanche) While missing around 10 games last year
due to injuries, Forsberg still managed to put up very good numbers (62
assists, 89 points). An injury-free year could mean a career year for
Forsberg, who could possibly win the scoring title.

2. Mario Lemieux- (Penguins) After coming out of retirement last season
to help the struggling Penguins, Lemieux jump started the Penguins and
led them to the playoffs. The talented Lemieux will put up points, but
he will take games off to rest and might miss the absence of one of the
world’s most talented players, Jaromir Jagr, more than he might think.

3. Joe Sakic- (Avalanche) The league’s Most Valuable Player last season
showed no signs of slowing down. If Sakic can stay healthy he
could once again challenge for the scoring title. With the help of the
high-powered Avalanche offence Sakic should have a 50 goal 50 assist
season.

4. Doug Weight- (Blues) Weight, who was traded to the Blues during the
summer, will find joy in playing with Keith Tckchuk and Pavol Demitra.
A change of scenery was something that Weight needed, and he could have
a 90-point season, but only 25 of those points being goals.

5. Jason Allison- (Bruins) Allison, who had a career year last year,
will probably not be in Boston by season’s start. After a 95-point
season last year, there are not many reasons why he should not repeat
that total, besides the fact that he might be playing on a weak team or
holding-out. Allison could finish the season in th Read more»

Rumblings in the Desert

by Brandon LeBourveau
on
The Coyotes’ 1st Round pick in the 2000 Draft, center Krystofer Kolanos from Boston College, is telling the team he would like to sign a contract and leave school for the pro ranks. Although Kolanos has not hired an agent yet, he said with the transition period the Coyotes are going through and the influx of young players they are bringing in, the time is right to leave school. NCAA rules strictly state that while attending college, players can not hire agents nor participate in training camp with any teams. Kolanos is going to try and work out a contract with the Coyotes without the help of an agent, so if the deal falls through, he can still remain with BC.

If Kolanos is signed to a deal, he has the talent to make this team right out of training camp. He capped off an excellent season with Boston College, registering 25 goals and 25 assists in 41 games. Being cut from the Canadian team for the 2001 World Junior Championships was a huge disappointment for Krys, but he capped off his excellent season in dynamic fashion by scoring the game winning goal against North Dakota on a nifty deke in overtime to win the NCAA Championship for Boston College. A season in the minors would definitely help him get accustomed to the faster-paced NHL game, but coming out of college Kolanos has an advantage over players in junior hockey, as college players play against older competition in 24 and 25 year olds, while also playing responsibly defensively, since there is no red-line in college hockey, meaning teams can make two-line passes leading to lots of breakaways. It will b Read more»

Habs open rookie development camp

by Chris Boucher
on
The Canadiens opened their annual rookie development camp on Monday. Unlike last year, when the team chose to invite mostly signed, or drafted prospects, the Habs chose instead to invite fifteen non-property invitees (16 if we include Dusty Jamieson) to go along with sixteen prospects who are already considered Montreal property.
Here’s a quick look at the three goalies, seven defensemen, and five forwards who the Habs hope to have a solid look at during the 11-day camp.

Goaltenders

Luc Belanger

The top goaltender in the CIAU last season. He recorded a 1.91 GAA, and a .931 save percentage to go along with 5 shutouts in 18 games. He finished with a 15-0-2 record, and led UQTR to the CIAU Men’s Championship.

Adam Russo

An 18 year-old QMJHL rookie who recorded a 3.25 GAA, and a .891 save percentage in 35 games with Acadie-Bathurst. Finished with a 15-13-2 record.

Olivier Michaud

A 17 year-old QMJHL rookie who recorded a 2.96 GAA, and a .882 save percentage in 21 games with Shawinigan. Finished with a 12-4-4 record.

Skaters

Jeff Beatch (6’5″, 188 lbs.)

The 20 year-old defenseman recorded 11 points (2-9-11) in 71 games with Seattle of the WHL. He finished the season +1, with 67 minutes in penalties.

Mike Colgan (6’3″, 204 lbs.)

The 21 year-old defenseman recorded 13 points (1-12-13) in 41 games during his senior season with Colorado College of the WCHA. He finished the season with 20 minutes in penalties.

Kevin Dallman (5’11”, Read more»

Sharks Swimming in Goaltenders

by Mike Delfino
on
In 1999, if you were to ask me which position were the San Jose Sharks
weakest at I would have easily answered goaltending. With Miikka
Kiprusoff still in Europe and Evgeni Nabokov a serious question mark, it
was a concern.

Now fast-forwarding to 2001, one can make an easy case that the Sharks
are most comfortable between the pipes. With Nabokov winning the Calder
Trophy as the league’s best rookie in 2001 and Kiprusoff who is
considered one of the best young goalies in the game, the Sharks have
two young goaltenders considered at the top of their position among
young players. In addition, they have Vesa Toskala who will be the next
starting goaltender next season in Cleveland, the Sharks’ new AHL
affiliate, and Nolan Schaefer who is quickly turning heads at Providence
College.

When a team drafts a player in the ninth round they hope that he will
make it to their AHL team. If he can make any kind of impact in the
AHL, that pick is considered a success. Rarely does a ninth round pick
make a serious impact in the NHL, in fact, most fans would be hard
pressed to name ten players currently making an impact in the NHL chosen
so late. However, Shark fans can easily name two, center Mark Smith
chosen in 1997, and Nabokov chosen with the 194th pick in 1994.

For a long time Nabokov was considered to be a typical ninth round
selection-a player who would struggle for a while and once he did make
it to Kentucky of the AHL, in all likelihood only make it as a backup.
He struggled immensely in his first season with Kentucky Read more»

Oilers strike riches in NCAA

by John Christie
on
Doug Weight, Bill Guerin, Todd Marchant, Shawn Horcoff. What do these players have in common. They all played and graduated in NCAA schools. In the 1990’s more and more NHL teams drafted players from the NCAA. Today’s NHL is getting more and more international and with the league being diluted, players from every league are being drafted and this includes the NCAA.

While many NHL teams draft players from the CHL or Finland, Czech Republic, Russia, Germany, Sweden, more NHL teams are also drafting and scouting the NCAA for talent.
Barry Fraser, who was the chief scout of the Edmonton Oilers from 1979 until 2000 was the person who decided the Oilers should go in this direction. Even though he had his up’s and down’s in scouting, one of his great legacies for the Oilers was the drafting and use of NCAA players.
The NCAA is of great benefit for NHL teams. Some of the advantages of players playing for NCAA schools are
Development. A player will play almost 3-4 years for there school and there development will come faster as they spend more time in school and play against older players rather then junior players in the CHL
NCAA players are not rushed as NHL clubs respect the player’s decision to stay in school and finish school
NCAA players are drafted as 19 year olds as NHL clubs get a better handle on players
NHL clubs are not in any hurry to sign NCAA players since they finish out there school career
Many Canadians and Americans are using the NCAA route in order to play hockey and secure an education. Scholarships Read more»

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