Ondrej Roman
www.whl.ca

Ondrej Roman

Hometown:

Ostrava-Poruba Czech Republic

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-02-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2007

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

Trade with Dallas, 2012

Weight:

165 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

After a terrific year in the Czech junior league, Roman arrived in North America via the 2006 CHL import draft, in which he was selected fifth overall by the Spokane Chiefs. The native of Ostrava, Czech Republic posted modest numbers in his rookie campaign, to the tune of 48 points in 70 games, good for fifth on the club. He saw some time on the power play, where he scored three of his four goals, and was bounced around the lines in even strength situations.

2007-08: Roman built off of his rookie season for Spokane (WHL).  He upped his plentiful amount of assists to 46, which is good for second on the team, and started finding his shot, to the tune of 15 goals (up from four).  Roman had a tremendous playoffs as he helped lead the Chiefs to a Memorial Cup championship; he led the club in assists (11) and points (20) in 21 games.

2008-09: Roman split time between the Spokane Chiefs(WHL) and HC Vitkovice of the Czech league. In 32 games in the WHL, Roman scored 10 goals and 22 assists. He also played in 12 playoff games, scoring once and adding 4 assists. Back home, Roman scored 3 goals and added 6 assists in 26 games with the Men’s club. He picked up 4 points in 4 games with their U20 Club.

2009-10: Roman stayed in the Czech Republic, splitting time between three clubs. He played in 10 games with HC Vitkovice’s U20 squad, scoring 9 goals and adding 17 assists in just 10 games. He moved up to HC Vitkovice’s main squad, picking up just 3 points in 26 games. He was loaned to HC Havirov, where he played in the second division. He scored 1 goals and added 6 assists in 11 games with his new club.

2010-11: Hopping from one side of the pond to the other every year is probably not what Ondrej Roman had in mind, but he finally landed in the AHL in 2010-11.  The Czech import played in 72 games, registering 14 assists and 22 points in what was a fairly mundane season for Roman.  He played up and down in the lineup and was sometimes used as a winger as opposed to center.  He didn’t provide the offensive spark for the defensive-minded team and his more-technical/less-physical style saw him scratched throughout most of Texas’ abbreviated playoffs.

Talent Analysis

Quick playmaking forward (can play center and wing) with slick hands.  Not the most beautiful skater in the world but he can move in quick bursts.  Smooth playmaker with very good vision.  Reticent shooter that prefers the pretty play to the shot.  Decent in the dot and has shown flashes of quality defensive play.  Not a very physical player and his size prevents him from penetrating high traffic areas with regularity.

Future

Will return to the AHL in 2011-12.  Roman was dealt to the Florida Panthers in exchange for Andelo Esposito.  

Potential: Longshot 2nd/3rd line tweener playmaking forward, like a less talented version of Ladislav Nagy (in his last NHL seasons).

Size Doesn’t Matter

by Chad Cranmer
on
Igor Larionov was considered by many people to be the best playmaker in the
world not named Wayne Gretzky during the 1980’s when he was centering the
famed KLM line on the Soviet Red Army team. Generously listed at 5’11” and
only weighing 170 pounds, Larionov managed to put together a brilliant
international career before finally playing in the NHL in 1989 as a
29-year-old rookie. If he was an 18-year-old rookie today, he might not
have been given a chance to play in the NHL. With the trend in the NHL
towards big bodies, he probably would have been considered too small.
Many general managers today would rather take a 6’4” 215 pound center with
limited skills than a 5’ 9” 165 pound center who can skate and handle the
puck. The thought is that you can’t teach size, but you can’t teach skills
that a player just does not have the physical tools for, either. Players
like Theo Fleury, Pat Verbeek, and Larionov have proven that small players
can be top line NHL players.

If you look at some of the most feared body checkers in the game in the last
decade, most of those players are not huge. Vladimir Konstantinov weighed
190 pounds. Mike Peca is not much bigger. Chris Chelios is listed at 6’1”
186 pounds, and yet he has sent more than his share of opponents to the
trainer’s table. “Terrible Ted” Lindsay, one of the toughest men ever to
play the game was only 5’ 10” and weighed 160 pounds! Compare them to the
passive 210 pound Larry Murphy or Mario Lemieux, who weighed 220 pounds, and
you have Read more»

Interview with Jordin Tootoo

by pbadmin
on

Preface: Once in a while a player comes along that is special. People
take notice. Imagine a player that takes no prisoners, slashes through
the opposition and breaks down the myth that a small player just can’t
make it in a big man’s game. Suppose this player also had the raw
skills and strength to show well on the international stage. Meet
Jordin Tootoo of the Brandon Wheat Kings, of the Western Hockey League,
Canada.

JA = John Agar, JT = Jordin Tootoo

JA: Thanks Jordin for helping us out at Hockey’s Future and reporting
on hockey’s future which I think you are going to be a big part of. I
have seen some very good things over the last few years; heard a lot
about you. A lot of people want to know about you, so we are very
grateful for your participation.

JT: Thanks John, for having me here too.

JA: Now Jordin, you were born in what year?

JT: I was born in 1983. February 2nd.

JA: So that puts you in what draft year?

JT: 01. 2001.

JA: Is that this year?

JT: Ya.

Read more»

The Weekend Warrior

by Randy Nicholson
on
Another in a series of weekly articles summarizing activity in Leafland
during the previous 7 days – with some personal observations,
commentary, prospect updates and fun thrown in for good measure.

Another Lindros Story: Apparently Mr. B. Clarke of Philadelphia is
ready to kiss and make up with the entire Lindros clan … its very
doubtful, though, that a proud man like Bobby would be willing to kiss
the particular part of Eric’s anatomy needed to bring that marriage back
off the rocks … there is a prevailing opinion out there that the Flyers
still effectively control Lindros’ destiny but I’m not really buying
into this view … Eric has no financial concerns (based on past earnings
and potential insurance income) and can basically refuse any trade
engineered by Clarke that is not to his liking … in the interim, he can
wait on the sidelines and regain his full health, knowing that
unrestricted free agency is now only approximately 1 ½ seasons away …
the law of diminishing returns is quickly coming into play here for his
former team … by the way, Eric is said to be still intent on playing for
the Maple Leafs and, given the situation outlined above, he’ll likely
get his wish if he simply remains patient and sticks to his guns …
incidently, I was very interested to note that the Flyers let Mark
Recchi play last week following a serious head injury … I suppose that
some things never change …

Keep The Faith: I have it on very good authority (and there is not a
greater Leafs’ expert in the world that my very goo Read more»

Late Round Selections Doing Well

by pbadmin
on
In most cases, attention tends to be focussed upon only the top draft
choices within any organization. Although this is also the case in
Toronto, I’d like to draw your attention to a couple of late round picks
that seem to be doing fairly well for the Maple Leafs.

2000 8th Round pick Lubos Velebny and 9th Round pick Jean-Philippe Cote
are both progressing nicely at this time. Both players have become
important defenders this season with Waterloo of the USHL and Cape
Breton of the QMJHL respectively.

Velebny, who many believed to be still playing in the Slovakian Jr.
League, has been placed with the USJHL team in Waterloo, IA by the Maple
Leafs. He had been reasonably impressive in limited duty at the team’s
Rookie Camp in September. Velebny has played in half of the (Waterloo)
Black Hawks’ games has one goal and one assist with 8 PIMs.

Cote, who was traded from Quebec last year to Cape Breton, is the (Cape
Breton) Eagle’s 2nd highest scoring defensemen after 16 games. He has
one goal and nine assists to go along with 15 PIMs. Like Velebny, Cote
possesses prototypical NHL size, plays a physical style and navigates
the ice fairly well.

With the recent success of other late round picks such as Kaberle,
Markov, and Berezin, the Maple Leafs will be well advised to remain
extremely patient with both of these youngsters.