Ondrej Roman
www.whl.ca

Ondrej Roman

Hometown:

Ostrava-Poruba Czech Republic

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-02-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2007

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

Trade with Dallas, 2012

Weight:

165 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

After a terrific year in the Czech junior league, Roman arrived in North America via the 2006 CHL import draft, in which he was selected fifth overall by the Spokane Chiefs. The native of Ostrava, Czech Republic posted modest numbers in his rookie campaign, to the tune of 48 points in 70 games, good for fifth on the club. He saw some time on the power play, where he scored three of his four goals, and was bounced around the lines in even strength situations.

2007-08: Roman built off of his rookie season for Spokane (WHL).  He upped his plentiful amount of assists to 46, which is good for second on the team, and started finding his shot, to the tune of 15 goals (up from four).  Roman had a tremendous playoffs as he helped lead the Chiefs to a Memorial Cup championship; he led the club in assists (11) and points (20) in 21 games.

2008-09: Roman split time between the Spokane Chiefs(WHL) and HC Vitkovice of the Czech league. In 32 games in the WHL, Roman scored 10 goals and 22 assists. He also played in 12 playoff games, scoring once and adding 4 assists. Back home, Roman scored 3 goals and added 6 assists in 26 games with the Men’s club. He picked up 4 points in 4 games with their U20 Club.

2009-10: Roman stayed in the Czech Republic, splitting time between three clubs. He played in 10 games with HC Vitkovice’s U20 squad, scoring 9 goals and adding 17 assists in just 10 games. He moved up to HC Vitkovice’s main squad, picking up just 3 points in 26 games. He was loaned to HC Havirov, where he played in the second division. He scored 1 goals and added 6 assists in 11 games with his new club.

2010-11: Hopping from one side of the pond to the other every year is probably not what Ondrej Roman had in mind, but he finally landed in the AHL in 2010-11.  The Czech import played in 72 games, registering 14 assists and 22 points in what was a fairly mundane season for Roman.  He played up and down in the lineup and was sometimes used as a winger as opposed to center.  He didn’t provide the offensive spark for the defensive-minded team and his more-technical/less-physical style saw him scratched throughout most of Texas’ abbreviated playoffs.

Talent Analysis

Quick playmaking forward (can play center and wing) with slick hands.  Not the most beautiful skater in the world but he can move in quick bursts.  Smooth playmaker with very good vision.  Reticent shooter that prefers the pretty play to the shot.  Decent in the dot and has shown flashes of quality defensive play.  Not a very physical player and his size prevents him from penetrating high traffic areas with regularity.

Future

Will return to the AHL in 2011-12.  Roman was dealt to the Florida Panthers in exchange for Andelo Esposito.  

Potential: Longshot 2nd/3rd line tweener playmaking forward, like a less talented version of Ladislav Nagy (in his last NHL seasons).

Lamoriello And Co. Still In Charge Of Devils’ Draft

by pbadmin
on
It is more or less official now. The John McMullen years are over for the Devils and new owners will be taking over shortly. However, the change in ownership does not mean there will be any changes at New Jersey’s draft table in Calgary on June 24.

Although still riding high after a second Stanley Cup victory in the last six seasons, you can be sure General Manager Lou Lamoriello will be more than ready for this year’s draft. With no assurance that the mysterious Lamoriello will return for next season, this could be his last hurrah.

Lamoriello and his staff, which includes unheralded chief scout David Conte, surely will be looking to continue the success of the past several years. There is no reason to expect the Devils will operate any differently from past years.

With a Stanley Cup winning team, there are usually not too many holes to fill. Therefore you can expect New Jersey will go after that proverbial best player available regardless of position. The Devils, with one of the NHL’s finest goaltenders in Martin Brodeur, still used first round picks to draft goalies in 1997 and 1999 (J.F. Damphousse and Ari Ahonen) despite the perception the club needed offensive players.

Lamoriello also will not be afraid to make a trade on draft day. The Devils had success moving down to draft Brodeur in 1990, as well as moving up to take Scott Gomez in 1998.
Read more»

High on Lowe

by pbadmin
on
Naming Kevin Lowe is a breath of fresh air to Edmonton, even though it came down to the last minute the best man for the job was ready and willing to take the franchise to the level of success they are accustomed to. Several attributes of the new General Manager will hopefully spill over onto the team. With his fiery temperament, competitiveness and unwillingness to say die he may mentally be the shot in the arm the players need to give them a gritty edge.

Winning six Stanley Cups, 5 from Edmonton and one in New York, and a couple years of coaching was enough of a criteria to the ownership group to name him the second General Manager in franchise history and it didn’t hurt that he was the pupil of Glen Sather for the better part of twenty years. Players were ecstatic and relieved when the announcement came in and ther was a resounding sigh in the locker room knowing that a big shakeup won’t happen. The Oilers respect and are confident in his abilities to guide the team.

Former teammate and CTV sports analyst Craig Simpson felt that this was the opportunity he has been waiting for and Kevin had his heart strings pulled by his ties to the city of Edmonton and the team. Since being the first draft pick in team history back in 1979, and being the player to score the first goal, Kevin has come full circle from prospect defenseman, to assistant coach, to head coach, and finally general manager.
Read more»

IHL Player Profile – Chris Marinucci

by Andrew Bourgeois
on

IHL PLAYER PROFILE


Chris Marinucci
Birthdate: Dec. 29, 1971
Hometown: Grand Rapids, Minnesota.
Height: 6-0
Weight: 190
Shoots: Left

Season Team Lge GP G A Pts PIM

1990-91 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 36 6 10 16 20
1991-92 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 37 6 13 19 41
1992-93 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 40 35 42 77 52
1993-94 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 38 30 31 61 65
1994-95 Denver Grizzlies IHL 74 29 40 69 42
1994-95 New York Islanders NHL 12 1 4 5 2
1995-96 Utah Grizzlies IHL 8 3 5 8 8
1996-97 Los Angeles Kings NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1996-97 Utah Grizzlies IHL 21 3 13 16 6
1996-97 Phoenix Roadrunners IHL 62 23 29 52 26
1997-98 Chicago Wolves IHL 78 27 48 75 35
1998-99 Chicago Wolves IHL 82 41 40 81 24
1999-00 Chicago Wolves IHL 80 31 33 64 18

Chris resigned with the Wolves on August 1999 as a free agent. Chris was the
New York Islanders 4th choice (90th overall) in the 1990 NHL Draft.
Chris Received the 1994 Hobey Baker Memorial Award, presented annually to
the most outstanding player in college hockey, during his senior season at Read more»

Sabres 2000 Draft Preview

by Ken McKenna
on
Every June, the NHL holds its annual talent replenishment in the form of the Entry Draft. Each draft is unique in that a particular position, or perhaps one league, team or country ends up being the main fixation of NHL GMs in the draft’s early going. With that thought in mind, the theme for the first couple rounds of the 2000 NHL Entry Draft will almost certainly be “The Russians Are Coming!”

By the time the 1st round is completed next Saturday, there will likely have been 9-10 Russian players drafted, a figure that represents 1/3 of the 1st round choices. When the 15th pick comes up, a pick held by the Buffalo Sabres, Buffalo may well be one of those teams that looks toward the talent-rich former Soviet Union for their top pick in the draft.
Read more»

Sharks 2000 Draft Preview

by Mike Delfino
on

As the Sharks head into the 2000 draft, barring any draft day trades, the Sharks will not end up with any bluechip prospects, or anyone ready to fill holes immediately. Being a weak draft, and since the Sharks enter this draft with no first round pick, the chances of them picking up anyone of substance are slim.
Holes the Sharks may try to fill this year are up front, as their defense is set for years to come. Unless a top goaltending prospect drops into the 3rd round, I don’t expect them to pick a goalie until the 5th round. Their most important need at this point resides at left wing where the Sharks remain thin and center, which is still a question mark.
The Sharks’ 1st round selection belongs to the Montreal Canadians as a result of the deal that brought Vincent Damphousse to San Jose. Barring any draft day trades, which I would not be surprised at, the Sharks will enter a draft for the first time without a first round draft pick.
The Sharks hold the option whether to give Montreal this year’s 2nd round choice or their 2nd round choice in 2001 as a result of the Damphousse trade. My opinion is that the Sharks should give Montreal this year’s pick for 2 main reasons. First, this draft simply isn’t very good, and 2001′s draft is very good. Next year, the Sharks could easily acquire a 2nd tier prospect in the 2nd round (a player normally a late 1st rounder). Second, next year’s pick is likely to be lower given an expected improvement next year. Read more»