Ondrej Roman
www.whl.ca

Ondrej Roman

Hometown:

Ostrava-Poruba Czech Republic

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-02-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2007

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

5-11

Acquired:

Trade with Dallas, 2012

Weight:

165 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

After a terrific year in the Czech junior league, Roman arrived in North America via the 2006 CHL import draft, in which he was selected fifth overall by the Spokane Chiefs. The native of Ostrava, Czech Republic posted modest numbers in his rookie campaign, to the tune of 48 points in 70 games, good for fifth on the club. He saw some time on the power play, where he scored three of his four goals, and was bounced around the lines in even strength situations.

2007-08: Roman built off of his rookie season for Spokane (WHL).  He upped his plentiful amount of assists to 46, which is good for second on the team, and started finding his shot, to the tune of 15 goals (up from four).  Roman had a tremendous playoffs as he helped lead the Chiefs to a Memorial Cup championship; he led the club in assists (11) and points (20) in 21 games.

2008-09: Roman split time between the Spokane Chiefs(WHL) and HC Vitkovice of the Czech league. In 32 games in the WHL, Roman scored 10 goals and 22 assists. He also played in 12 playoff games, scoring once and adding 4 assists. Back home, Roman scored 3 goals and added 6 assists in 26 games with the Men’s club. He picked up 4 points in 4 games with their U20 Club.

2009-10: Roman stayed in the Czech Republic, splitting time between three clubs. He played in 10 games with HC Vitkovice’s U20 squad, scoring 9 goals and adding 17 assists in just 10 games. He moved up to HC Vitkovice’s main squad, picking up just 3 points in 26 games. He was loaned to HC Havirov, where he played in the second division. He scored 1 goals and added 6 assists in 11 games with his new club.

2010-11: Hopping from one side of the pond to the other every year is probably not what Ondrej Roman had in mind, but he finally landed in the AHL in 2010-11.  The Czech import played in 72 games, registering 14 assists and 22 points in what was a fairly mundane season for Roman.  He played up and down in the lineup and was sometimes used as a winger as opposed to center.  He didn’t provide the offensive spark for the defensive-minded team and his more-technical/less-physical style saw him scratched throughout most of Texas’ abbreviated playoffs.

Talent Analysis

Quick playmaking forward (can play center and wing) with slick hands.  Not the most beautiful skater in the world but he can move in quick bursts.  Smooth playmaker with very good vision.  Reticent shooter that prefers the pretty play to the shot.  Decent in the dot and has shown flashes of quality defensive play.  Not a very physical player and his size prevents him from penetrating high traffic areas with regularity.

Future

Will return to the AHL in 2011-12.  Roman was dealt to the Florida Panthers in exchange for Andelo Esposito.  

Potential: Longshot 2nd/3rd line tweener playmaking forward, like a less talented version of Ladislav Nagy (in his last NHL seasons).

Jamie Lundmark: Rangers wait for the payoff

by HF Staff
on

The Rangers are a team known more for using their “big bucks” rather then their “brain trust”, but times seemed to have changed at the 1999 NHL draft as the Rangers decided they were going to try and swing for the fences. After acquiring Pavel Brendl with the fourth selection many people thought the Rangers were done, but they were just warming up. After completing the deal with Calgary GM AL Coates the night before, the Rangers nabbed a kid whom they had been watching since early November, Moose Jaw Warriors forward Jamie Lundmark. Though the price was heavy the Rangers might just be able to look back and say they got the steal of the draft for the second year in a row.

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The Toronto Maple Leafs’ Prospects Camp: Building Their Organization from the Gr

by pbadmin
on

Imagine yourself back on that little league field with your new team. Or on the ice for the first time with your midget team. The coach’s are watching, instructing, teaching. Your heart has been pounding from the moment you woke up that morning, anticipating the excitement, the competition that awaits you. The unknown: Will you make the grade?

Now imagine yourself going halfway around the world possibly to a country where you speak precious little of their native language. You are accustomed to being a “big fish” and you are now thrust into the “big pond” with other big fish. It is your first touch with an NHL franchise, YOUR NHL franchise, and you are wondering: Will I make the grade?

The Toronto Maple Leafs entrust a big part of their future to a very capable man, Chris MacDonald. “My role is a little difficult to define”, says the very personable man, who is also Queens University’ hockey coach. “I can best explain it as coordinating the Toronto Maple Leafs’ prospects’ adjustment to the NHL. Not only on the hockey level, but acclimating them to the city, to the organization, to each other.” He works hand-in-hand with Leafs’ assistant GM Anders Hedberg, creating a “comfort zone” to players who largely represent the future of the franchise.
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The Soo Greyhounds–A Look Ahead

by pbadmin
on

The Soo Greyhounds 1998-99 season was a very successful one. They won 10 straight games and improved their point total from 1997-98 by 23 points. The 1999-2000 season looks to be a good one as the Greyhounds have 16 returning players. At the draft the Greyhounds also added 19-year-old left-winger Brent Theobald. He was acquired in a trade with the Missisauga IceDogs at the draft.

The Greyhounds are in a good position because most of the teams in the division are losing a lot of players. The Plymouth Whalers for example are possibly losing the likes of Harold Druken, Adam Colagiacomo, Paul Mara and Robert Holsinger.

In goal the Greyhounds are in very good shape because Jake McCracken is definitely coming back and Jason Flick may be back as one of the Greyhounds three overages. McCracken will be looking to bounce back from an off-year where he didn’t play his best hockey. Flick, if he does come back will be looking to repeat his tremendous performance from last season. Remember though, it’s not a guarantee that he is coming back.

The defensemen on last season’s club were pretty good. The problem is two of last year’s defensemen (Dan Passero and Rob Mulick) are candidates for the three overage spots on this year’s team. However, they did have five other strong defensemen.

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Interview with Jeff McKercher

by pbadmin
on

Dallas Stars prospect Jeff McKercher played with the Peterbourgh Petes of the OHL last season. During that time he had one goal, seven assists, and 22 PIMs in 65 regular season games. He also sported an impressive plus/minus rating of +32 during this same time period.

Although known for these examples of steady play and solid defense, McKercher is little known.

Please briefly describe your style of play for the readers not already familiar with you.
“I am a defensive defenseman who reads the ice well. I like to make the quick, first pass out of the defensive zone. I take pride in my work in penalty-killing situations.”

What do you feel that you could add to the Dallas defensive ranks in the future?
“I will strive to be a defensive defenseman with the Stars and hope that I will be a regular on the penalty-kill. I try to pattern myself after the play of Craig Ludwig.”

Do you see yourself ever becoming more of an offensive-minded player in the future?
“I would like to think that I might become a little bit more offensive to complement my defensive style. My skating is strong so hopefully with experience this part of my game will develop. I usually have been paired with an offensive defenseman and my job has been to stay back and hold the fort.”

What do you see as being your current strengths and weaknesses? Read more»

Tim Connolly – “Hockey’s Future”

by pbadmin
on

One great thing about watching Junior Major hockey is seeing the future stars of hockey. Ever since he was drafted by the Erie Otters in 1997, forward Tim Connolly was touted as a high draft choice in the 1999 NHL Entry Draft and being a future star of the NHL.

On June 26th at the FleetCenter in Boston, the first part of the above statement came true. The New York Islanders, who had the 5th selection overall, selected Connolly. While it is quite an achievement for a player to be selected in the first round, Tim had two other noticeable achievements with his selection by the Islanders. Tim was the first player selected from the CHL, and the OHL, and was the first North American born player selected in the draft. A native of Baldwinsville, NY, Connolly stated that, “It is a great honor to be the first North American player selected in the draft”.

Connolly has been a standout player for the Otters the past two years. Tim has dazzled Erie fans, OHL fans and OHL opponents with his superb skating and puck-handling skills. During the 97-98 year with Erie, where he won the Otters Rookie of the Year, Tim scored 30 goals and 32 assists for 62 points. During the 98-99 season, Connolly scored 34 goals and 34 assists for 68, in spite of playing 13 fewer games. In a February game against the Windsor Spitfires, Connolly suffered a broken leg, which ended his play for the remainder of the 98-99 season. In spite of this injury, Connolly still finished as the leading scorer for the Otters.
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