Sebastien Piche
the NHL

Sebastien Piche

Hometown:

Evain Quebec

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1988-02-04

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2006

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

6-0

Acquired:

Trade with Detroit, 2012

Weight:

202 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2008-09: Had a breakout year for Rimouski, scoring 72 points in 62 games.

2009-10: In his first pro season, Piche appeared in 9 AHL games with Grand Rapids with no points and 4 PIMs. He skated in 36 ECHL games with the Toledo Walleye, scoring 5 goals, 23 assists for 28 points. He added 2 assists in 4 playoff games.

2010-11: Piche spent most of his season on the ECHL’s Toledo Walleye, playing in 48 games and scoring 12 goals and 21 assists for 33 points. He also saw time with the Griffins where he put up 2 assists through 11 games.

Talent Analysis

Is an offensive-oriented defenseman. Piche does very well on the powerplay, as he has good puck control and possesses an impressive, strong shot. He also plays a steady defensive game when needed.

Future


Projects as a depth defenseman. Will really need to step up and show he can play at the pro level.  Piche was dealt to the Tampa Bay Lightning in the deal that brought Kyle Quincey back to the Detroit Red Wings.

WHL Preview

by Tom Hoffert
on

With the pre-season firing on all cylinders, it is time to look into the new rules of play for the WHL. Junior hockey fans are in for a real change this season with new procedures like the “Fast Face-Off” and “4-on-4” regulation play. Yes, this may be the season fans learn to love our gifted men in black and white stripes. This year may put them in better graces with fans due to a host of contraversial rules handed down by the Canadian Hockey League. These rule changes will be in effect during the pre-season and regular season in all three CHL umbrella leagues: the Western Hockey League, Ontario Hockey League, and Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.

New Rules Overview:

“Fast Face-Off”- This procedure will essentially give the linesman the ability to drop the puck on face-offs, regardless of whether both centres are ready for the drop. The rule is based on a 5-second line change (per team) and an additional allocation of 5-seconds to prepare for the puck drop. When the team line changes are complete, the linesman will blow his whistle, indicating no more than five seconds until the puck drop will occur. The obvious result of this rule will be that players must quickly get in position for face-offs, knowing the other team may gain control of the puck if they are not prepared. Face-offs are the beginning step in garnering control of the play, thus teams will emphasize the importance of this new rule to their teams. Fans will definitely be divided on their thoughts about this new regulation. Some will love the quicker speed, others will publ Read more»

Bridgeport Report

by Steve Feldman
on

NEWS

NHL Cancels Weekends Games


The National Hockey League announced today that all games through Sunday, September 16 have been canceled. The regular slate of pre-season games will start on Monday, September 17.

Sound Tigers Attend Norwalk Oyster Festival
The Bridgeport Sound Tigers front office, players, and mascot attended the Norwalk Oyster Festival. Fans were able to meet players, purchase merchandise, and purchase tickets for the upcoming season. The team was on hand at the Big Boy Toy Show Tent.

The oyster festival is a major fundraiser for the revitalization of the Norwalk Harbor area. The celebration is held in Veteran’s Park in East Norwalk. Proceeds from each year’s festival also provide year-round funding for the Norwalk Seaport Association’s environmental Education Programs.

Emile Francis and Norman Poile Honored with New AHL Trophies Read more»

Panthers Training Camp Q&A’s

by Mark Fischel
on


Panther Training Camp Reflections

With the Panthers training camp getting the opportunity to move to the National Car Rental Center for the next few days, Panthers coaching staff turned up the intensity of the practices with a few new drills for the team. Working on up-tempo drills that emphasized puck movement, reduced space on the ice, and physical play, several of the Panther prospects had a chance to show off their skills. Hockey’s Future had the chance to ask some questions to a few of the players who will be playing tommorow in the intra-squad game.


Niklas Hagman

Hockey’s Future: Niklas, What has been your initial impressions of the training camp so far?

Niklas Hagman:Well last week I was at the rookie camp and that was ok. I got the chance to get used to the smaller rink and the more physical game style. I have been here three times on the ice and it has been nice to get to know the guys, and go to the ice and figure out the playing style. Its going okay.

Hockey’s Future: What do you feel the adjustments are that you will have to make from playing the Euro style to the North American style.

Niklas Hagman: Of course it is so different here than back in Europe. The rink is smaller and everyone is shooting everywhere. In Finland and in Europe, they try to pass it the open guy. I don’t see that there is too much for me to change the game, but you got to be ready because there will be more hits, and you got to shoot the puck more Read more»

Red Wings Camp Notes

by Jessica Haskin
on

As I stood watching the Red Wings out on the practice a doctor walked in
behind me looking for Pete Correia, the director of training camp. He
was there to find out where to park the motor home that contained
everything for a blood drive. The Red Wings had volunteered to donate
blood after their practices, scrimmages, and workouts of the day.

Trainer John Wharton approved of it from a medical stand point as long
as they ate and drank enough between working out and donating their
blood.

So after all of their on and off ice conditioning was completed the Red
Wings went out to the parking lot and donated their blood to help
restore the blood banks around the country in the aftermath of Tuesday’s
attacks.

There were also other acts of kindness from the Red Wings giving a few
moments of their time with the handicapped who were there to watch the
practices and scrimmages.

Young Courtney Bailey, a 7 year old girl from Traverse City, MI, who’s
confined to a wheelchair was there to watch her favorite player, Kris
Draper, and the rest of the Red Wings. As Mathieu Dandenault walked by
getting ready to play in one of the scrimmages, he stopped to talk and
have his picture taken with her.

Draper, who’d been on the ice for Team B’s practice, was walking off the
ice past her and recognized her from two years before and stopped for a
chat. Courtney asked why he hadn’t responded to her letter that she had
sent him. Draper couldn’t remember receiving a letter from her but asked
for her address promising to write her when he got back ho Read more»

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