Sebastien Piche
the NHL

Sebastien Piche

Hometown:

Evain Quebec

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1988-02-04

Position:

D

Eligible for draft:

2006

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

6-0

Acquired:

Trade with Detroit, 2012

Weight:

202 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2008-09: Had a breakout year for Rimouski, scoring 72 points in 62 games.

2009-10: In his first pro season, Piche appeared in 9 AHL games with Grand Rapids with no points and 4 PIMs. He skated in 36 ECHL games with the Toledo Walleye, scoring 5 goals, 23 assists for 28 points. He added 2 assists in 4 playoff games.

2010-11: Piche spent most of his season on the ECHL’s Toledo Walleye, playing in 48 games and scoring 12 goals and 21 assists for 33 points. He also saw time with the Griffins where he put up 2 assists through 11 games.

Talent Analysis

Is an offensive-oriented defenseman. Piche does very well on the powerplay, as he has good puck control and possesses an impressive, strong shot. He also plays a steady defensive game when needed.

Future


Projects as a depth defenseman. Will really need to step up and show he can play at the pro level.  Piche was dealt to the Tampa Bay Lightning in the deal that brought Kyle Quincey back to the Detroit Red Wings.

Schastlivy gets opportunity to redeem himself

by Jake Dole
on
When Petr Schastlivy was drafted 101st overall by the Ottawa Senators in the 1998 draft, word got around that the Sens selected a steal. The young left winger was known as an exceptionally talented goal-scoring sniper with great puck-control ability. Drafted out of Torpedo-Yaroslavl, Petr was drawing raves from the Ottawa scouts, who were convinced that they had the potential to develop into a future NHL star.
After another year of development in Russia, Schastlivy moved on to North America and got his first taste of the game in the foreign continent. Starting off in the prospects camp at Hull, Schastlivy was easily one of the best players there. Despite certain defensive deficiencies, Petr stood out with his excellent 1 on 1 ability. Soon enough, he got the call to try out for the Senators at the team’s training camp.
When it came to first impressions, it is safe to say that Petr did not disappoint. In fact, in the seven games of camp, he tied the team lead in points with 6 in 7 games, Marian Hossa being the other to draw even. However, despite his performance, the 20-year old was cut, mainly because of the team’s depth of speed and skill. As a result, Schastlivy spent most of the year in the IHL, playing for the Grand Rapids Griffiths.
The training camp was not the only highlight of his career to that point. In fact, Schastlivy was the member of the 1999 Russian U-18 gold medal winning team in Winnipeg. There, he performed admirably with the likes of Maxim Balmochnykh, Maxim Afinogenov and Vitaly Vishnevksy.
A sol Read more»

Summer 2001 Philadelphia Flyers System Review

by Bill Meltzer
on

Goaltenders

For much of the early part of Philadelphia Flyers history, goaltending was a major strength of the organization. From Bernie Parent to the young Pete Peeters to Pelle Lindbergh to the young Ron Hextall, the Flyers rarely had reason for concern between the pipes. For much of the last decade plus, however, the Flyers have been suspect in goal, with draftees such as Dominic Roussel and Tommy Söderström failing to take the starting job and run with it and veterans such Hextall, Sean Burke, and John Vanbiesbrouck suffering letdowns at crucial moments.

In recent years, the organization has re-stocked its goaltending depth through the draft; nabbing 1999-2000 rookie sensation Brian Boucher in the first round of the 1995 draft; Jean-Marc Pelletier (now with the Carolina organization) in the second round of the 1997 draft; 1999-2000 Finnish Elite League Rookie of the year Antero Niittymäki in the sixth round of the 1998 draft; and Maxime Ouellet, who is considered a franchise-goalie caliber prospect in the first round of the 1999 draft.

Last season, the Flyers used a mid-round draft pick to take veteran Czech star Roman Cechmanek, hoping that Cechmanek could step in as Boucher’s backup. Instead, as Boucher struggled, Cechmanek (after a brief stint in the AHL early in the season) not only claimed the starting job, he ended up as the runner-up for the Vezina Trophy and 4th in the Hart Trophy balloting. The big netminder, who will turn 31 by the end of the 2001-02 season, enters the upcoming season firmly entrenched as the Flyers star Read more»

The Broadway Blue Line

by Brandon LeBourveau
on

The Rangers’ defensive depth can not be overlooked. Although the Rangers’ defense was horrible last season (they gave up the most goals against in the NHL), the future blue line does look bright on Broadway. I fully expect at least one rookie defenseman to stick with the team this year for the entire season. Glen Sather added veteran defenseman Igor Ulanov and Dave Karpa to the club, therefore taking away the opportunity for more youngsters to make the team on defense. Last year’s rookie defensemen, Tomas Kloucek and Dale Purinton, were bright spots on a bad team, while others such as Mike Mottau and Peter Smrek impressed in a few games towards the end of the season. Tomas Kloucek will be out until around December, as he is still recovering from a torn ACL suffered in a game late last season against the Atlanta Thrashers when his leg slammed awkwardly into the boards, but, it will take him longer than that to get back to the level where he was last season.

Unless a trade is made, there is a log jam at defense for the Rangers. Brian Leetch, a fully recovered Vladimir Malakhov, Kim Johnsson, Igor Ulanov and Dale Purinton appear to have spots locked up to start the season, while Dave Karpa will likely stay on as a 7th defenseman. Kloucek will still be recovering, as will Sylvain Lefebvre who had shoulder surgery this off-season. The 6th spot is up for grabs during training camp, and whoever plays the best will likely wind up being the one who stays with the big club. Mike Mottau and Peter Smrek s Read more»

Islanders Myrvold Says Yes…. to SC Bern

by Evan Andriopoulos
on

Myrvold originally one of Norway`s brighter prospects said no thanks to an offer from Mike Milbury`s Islanders earlier this summer. His agent was working out a deal with the Montreal Canadiens when Myrvold decided the after tax salary of 175,000 USD was enough to make him say yes to Bern of the Swiss league.

In 2000-01 he recorded (69gp 5g 24a 29tp 129pim) with Springfield and in 13 games with the parent Islanders he notted 1 assist.

So for this Viking, the journey to the NHL now goes through Switzerland and SC Bern.

Other News and Notes: American Defender Matt Jarret ex. UConnecticut defender is back in the states after some tryouts in France and Norway. Jarret hopes to return to Norway for a tryout with VIF-Hockey and some other clubs later this summer.

Aker Hockey has signed up several new players for the Norwegian 4th division including American center Eirk Olsen (5-11 180) and Canadian winger Ryley MacKenzie(5-10 175). These players along with a new Swedish sniper should help Aker move back up to a higher division next season and they join American player-coach Evan Andriopoulos (def.6-2 220).

Ducks have two very important decisions to make at camp this year

by Jamie Randolph
on
The Mighty Ducks have two very important decisions to make at training camp this fall. Where will their two top prospects play this season?

Stanislav Chistov, the Ducks first pick (fifth overall) in this year’s NHL Entry Draft has four options.

He could make the NHL straight out of camp which is a possibility as he has the skill to do so, but I think another year of development would do him good.

The Ontario Hockey League’s, London Knights drafted Chistov in last years import draft. It’s an option but in my opinion for a player like Chistov it’s not a good move because he already played junior A hockey in Canada and in California. It’s not like he has to learn a new language or grow accustom to North Amrerican culture. If fellow Mighty Duck prospect Maxim Rybin who is 5’9″ can become a sniper in the OHL, when he is not nearly as talented as Chistov, imagine what Chistov could do. Dominating the OHL will not help him with his problem of cutting across the middle of the ice so that is not the best option. Chistov needs to learn how to avoid checks and injury. A higher level would suit him better.

There is the Russian Super League which I think is the worst option. Chistov skills are NHL ready, he just needs to grow accustom to the physical style of the NHL so going back to Russia isn’t a great choice.

Read more»

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