Timo Pielmeier
www.haie.de

Timo Pielmeier

Hometown:

Deggendorf Germany

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1989-07-07

Position:

G

Eligible for draft:

2007

Catches:

Left

Drafted:

2007

Height:

6-0

Acquired:

Trade with San Jose, 2009

Weight:

172 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • C

History

2006-07: US-Land Banking League, previously known as the DNL (Deutsche Nachwuchs-Liga), experienced something it hadn't seen in six years – a champion from a town other than Mannheim, Germany. The new German champion was none other than the Cologne EC Junior Sharks. Spearheading the way to the championship after a second place finish during the regular season was 17 year-old goalie Timo Pielmeier, who posted a win-loss record of 24-11 in the regular season followed by a 6-0 record in the playoffs. His total of 2070 minutes played easily topped the league, while his 2.17 GAA was tops among goalies who had played at least 20 games during the season. In addition to this impressive achievement at home, Timo represented Germany on the international stage in both the U20 WJC and the U18 WJC, helping Germany remain in the A-group at both competitions. Particularly impressive was his 3-2 victory against Latvia and the 6-3 victory over the Czech Republic at the U18 WJC held in Tampere and Rauma, Finland.  Drafted by the San Jose Sharks in the third round of the 2007 NHL Draft, 83rd overall.

2008-09: Traded to the Anaheim Ducks in the deal that brought Travis Moen and Kent Huskins to the San Jose Sharks. Playing for Shawinigan of the QMJHL, he posted a 29-11 record in 43 games. He also registered 2 shutouts, a 2.64 GAA, and a .914 save percentage.

2009-10: Of all the goaltending prospects Anaheim has in the minors, Pielmeier Is the only one who hasn’t found trouble getting regular playing time. Assigned to the ECHL Bakersfield Condors.In 57 games, he posted a 27-22-5 record, a 3.29 GAA, and a .883 save percentage.

2010-11: Pielmeier made his NHL debut in a February game against St. Louis, playing the last two periods in relief of Curtis McElhinney. In his only NHL appearance, he allowed 5 goals on 12 shots in the 9-3 loss. Pielmeier spent the majority of the season with AHL Syracuse, splitting time with Jean-Philippe Levasseur. In 37 games with the Crunch, Pielmeier was 16-18 with 1 shutout and had a 3.09 GAA and .906 save percentage. He played two games with ECHL Elmira and was 1-1 with a 3.37 GAA and .873 save percentage.
 

Future

Playing time at a high level is an issue right now.

Canucks’ Defensemen

by Kirk Pedersen
on

A look at the young blueliners who will shape the Canucks’ backline for the coming seasons.

The Big Kahuna of all Canuck prospects, not to mention defensemen, is undoubtedly Bryan Allen. The Giant has been slowed in his development by a slew of injuries, which is unfortunate, if it weren’t for injuries, he probably would have spent the majority of ’00-’01 in Vancouver.

Another of the newcomers this season unfortunately didn’t make the NHL. Rene Vydareny, a steal in the third round of the 1999 Entry Draft, spent a lot of this season walking around Vancouver, as he could not get out of a European contract agreement, which prevented him from playing minor pro. (i.e. the AHL, IHL, UHL, whichever other leagues) Once Rene got under contract, one thought he could just step right in and put up points, but it’s good that the Canucks didn’t rush him along in his development, as he has much to learn in the minor leagues before becoming a productive NHL’er. He only had one lonely point in thirty-nine games with the Blades of the IHL, and looked out of place when he was put on the ice by coach Smyl. He is, however, only one year removed from Junior hockey. He will definitely be worth the wait for the Canucks. ETA: 2004, or late 2003.

The next young defenseman is talented, young Zenith Komarniski. He has raw ability. He hasn’t shown the Canucks all that much thus far in his pro career, although he did earn an eighteen-game call-up with the big club last season, as injuries ravaged the Canucks’ blueline. He has as much potential as any d Read more»

Habs’ Prospects Improving

by Chris Boucher
on
When trying to determine whether a player will develop NHL calibre skills, we tend to look at how that player is improving year to year. A prospect is just that; a prospect. Only by improving year to year will any player develop the skills necessary to produce at the NHL level. Skating, speed and strength are difficult attributes to measure on a year to year basis. They are far less tangible than raw stats, but in no way less important. The easiest way to measure a player’s improvement is by breaking down their production into a point per game basis. Then comparing that number to the previous year’s total.

When comparing The Montreal Canadiens’ prospects’ point per game totals from this season with those of 1999-2000, Johan Eneqvist shows the greatest improvement. The young Swede was chosen with one of the Canadiens’ 4th round picks, 109th overall in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft. The 6’0″, 183 lbs. center averaged 0.64 PPG during the 99-00 season. Through 21 games this season he averaged an incredible 1.62 PPG; an improvement of 0.98. Canadiens’ fans will be keeping a close eye on Eneqvist’s progression next season.

A close second to Eneqvist is Chicoutimi’s Christian Larrivée. Chosen in the 4th round of the 2000 NHL Entry Draft, Larrivée scored more goals this year than he did points during the entire 99-00 season. The 6’3′, 195 Lbs. center averaged only 0.33 PPG in 99-00. Through 72 games this season He averaged 1.11 PPG; a solid improvement of 0.78 PPG. Larrivée must however, improve his defensive game. He finished 99-00 with an ugly Read more»

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