Tyler McNeely

Hometown:

Burnaby British Columbia

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1987-04-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2005

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

5-10

Acquired:

Free agent signing, 2011

Weight:

175 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2008-09: McNeely appeared in 34 games for Northeastern as a sophomore – missing seven games late in the season with a sprained ankle. He scored 8 goals with 12 assists and was +10 with 71 PMs. Northeastern finished second in Hockey East during the regular season – the school's first winning season since 2001-02 – and faced Cornell in an NCAA regional semifinal.

2009-10: McNeely was a team captain and skated in 33 of 34 games as a junior at Northeastern. He was the third-leading scorer for the Huskies, who finished ninth in Hockey East and missed the league playoffs. He scored 12 goals, including 6 power play goals, with 16 assists and was -3 with 42 PMs.

2010-11: McNeely made his professional debut on an amateur tryout with Bridgeport (AHL) following his senior season at Northeastern and impressed Islanders brass enough to earn a free agent contract. In ten games for the last-place Sound Tigers he scored 5 goals with 6 assists and was +9 with 4 PMs. McNeely was the second-leading scorer for Northeastern during his senior season as the Huskies finished a disappointing sixth in Hockey East. McNeely skated in all 38 games for the Huskies and had 13 goals with 21 assists and was +9 with 52 PMs. McNeely scored five times on the power play for the Huskies.

Talent Analysis

McNeely has average size and was not a highly sought after college free agent. He has very good hands and tremendous finishing ability. He can fill in wherever he is needed and is very solid on the penalty kill.

Future

McNeely is long shot to make the Islanders, but could fill in as a solid bottom-six forward with the Islanders when needed.

The NHL Draft; A History Of Impressive Late Round Gems

by Matt Wood
on
Every year about this time, things start heating up surrounding the
forthcoming NHL Draft. The world junior tournament is over, CSB Mid
season rankings are out, the CHL all star and prospect games have been
decided and the playoffs are near. Although its no surprise that so much
focus is placed upon the top junior prospects, NHL teams employ more pro
scouts and invest more money than ever before into the entire draft
process for a reason. In taking a close look at past drafts its
interesting to see how many of the more successful guys in the league
made it, when the odds were so clearly stacked against them. Here’s a
few late round gems from the early 80′s until 1996.


1996 Round  8 - Tomas Kaberle
     Round  7 - Pavel Kubina

1995 Round  7 - P.J. Axelson and Peter Worrell
     Round  9 - Danil Markov

1994 Round  6 - Daniel Alfredsson and Alexander Selivanov
     Round  9 - Steve Sullivan
     Round 10 - Richard Zednik, Sergei Berezin, and Tomas Holmstrom

1993 Round  7 - Todd Marchant and Darren Van Impe
     Round  9 - Mike Grier and Pavol Dimitra
     Round 10 - German Titov

1992 Round  7 - Ian Laperriere
     Round  8 - Stephan Yelle
     Round  9 - Nikolai Khabibulin
     Round 10 - Jonus Hoglund, Anson Carter, and Dan McGillis

1991 Round  8 - Dmitri Mironov, Brian Savage, Janne Laukkanen, and Corey Hirsch

1990 Round  7 - Jason York, Robert Lang, and Eric Lacroix
     Round  8 - Andre Kovalenko, Peter Bondra, and Alex Karpotsov
     Round 11 - Valeri Zelepukin,  Read more»

The Empty Nest Syndrome

by pbadmin
on
The QMJHL’s Maritime Division is beginning to look a lot like the NHL’s
Southeast Division with it’s top team playing below .500 yet still winning.

With the 2000-2001 season winding down, the Halifax Mooseheads have been
somewhat of a disappointment for long-term fans. The folks who have watched
the likes of Alex Tanguay, Ramzi Abid, Brandon Reid and Jody Shelley must
feel like parents in a way. They’ve watched their sons grow and blossom and
become draftees into the pros. Now they’re gone.

In sociology, one would consider this the Empty Nest years with the kids
having grown up and moved away. In their absence, we’ve even had a Memorial
Cup hosted in Halifax last year. Once the hoopla had ended, it grew quiet.

Tanguay is now among the NHL’s elite as a member of the Colorado Avalanche
(of course he is, we didn’t have any doubts) and Jody Shelley has managed to
sign with the expansion Columbus Blue Jackets. Not bad.

So the question on every Mooseheads’ fan’s mind is this: Who is going to be
the next Tanguay or Abid?

Two young men who have had an impact on the team are eligible for this
year’s entry draft and are expected to be picked within the first four
rounds. Netminder Pascal Leclaire is touted as the number one goalie
prospect of the Canadian Juniors while a six-foot four-inch Slovak named
Milan Jurcina is likely going to find himself grabbed within the third or
fourth round.

It’s no big secret that the Mooseheads are in a rebuilding phase but it
seems like everyone aro Read more»

The Good Fight

by pbadmin
on

The end may be in sight for overager Nick Greenough.

It was nearly three weeks ago when the Halifax Mooseheads announced the
release of their spirited left-winger. A questionable decision at best but
certainly a chance for the feisty forward to shine elsewhere.

Should no other QMJHL team claim the 20-year-old, Greenough will be free to
sign with any OHL or WHL team.
Mooseheads GM Marcel Patenaude avoided comment as to the performance-related
reasons, if any, that may have influenced his decision on Greenough before
putting him on waivers.
“This [was] a difficult decision,” Patenaude said. “Nick has been a valuable
member of the Mooseheads and has always given 100 percent since he arrived
in Halifax last season.”
“It has always been the Mooseheads’ policy to make every effort to allow our
players to continue their hockey careers. We are making this move today to
give Nick every possible chance to complete the season in major junior.”
Greenough stunned the Mooseheads front office this past September when he
touted himself as a glowing asset to the team during training camp. Many
Moosehead fans expected him to fill the hole created by fan-favourite Ryan
Flinn after his release due to a questionable back.
“I’m going to try to step up offensively this year,” said Greenough at the
end of last summer. “If I get the chance in front of the net to bury it, I’m
going to bury it. I also feel, as a 20-year-old, I have to bring leadership
and the stuff that comes along with that, which I know I can do because I
was an assist Read more»

Sabres Report: Rights Offering

by Ken McKenna
on

While Buffalo’s prospect depth at the center position is somewhat weak, they are slightly more blessed with talent on the right side. While there is only one virtual lock to play in the NHL (Norm Milley), there are at least 2 (and maybe 3) other prospects who, should they play to their potential, will have a shot at making the Buffalo roster in the future.

Buffalo’s top prospect at right wing, Norm Milley, is currently in his first pro campaign as a member of the Rochester Americans. Although Norm has not exhibited the goal-scoring prowess that he displayed in the OHL, he has nonetheless been an effective player for Rochester. Norm is currently 5th in scoring for the Amerks, but, more importantly, his +/- ranking is currently a +2. First-year players often sport minus figures, so this is no small accomplishment for Norm.

Norm has proven to be a versatile player for Rochester, as he has spent time on both the power play and penalty killing units. Milley is an excellent skater, an asset that allows him to be solid on both the forecheck and backcheck. And, while Norm may be smaller in stature, he has nonetheless played with some feistiness. As far as Buffalo is concerned, Norm’s best asset might be his right-handed shot, a trait shared by exactly none of the Sabres’ current group of right wings.

Milley had an impressive training camp, and has progressed enough this year that he could land a spot on Buffalo’s roster next season. Given Buffalo’s Read more»