Tyler McNeely

Hometown:

Burnaby British Columbia

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1987-04-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2005

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

5-10

Acquired:

Free agent signing, 2011

Weight:

175 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2008-09: McNeely appeared in 34 games for Northeastern as a sophomore – missing seven games late in the season with a sprained ankle. He scored 8 goals with 12 assists and was +10 with 71 PMs. Northeastern finished second in Hockey East during the regular season – the school's first winning season since 2001-02 – and faced Cornell in an NCAA regional semifinal.

2009-10: McNeely was a team captain and skated in 33 of 34 games as a junior at Northeastern. He was the third-leading scorer for the Huskies, who finished ninth in Hockey East and missed the league playoffs. He scored 12 goals, including 6 power play goals, with 16 assists and was -3 with 42 PMs.

2010-11: McNeely made his professional debut on an amateur tryout with Bridgeport (AHL) following his senior season at Northeastern and impressed Islanders brass enough to earn a free agent contract. In ten games for the last-place Sound Tigers he scored 5 goals with 6 assists and was +9 with 4 PMs. McNeely was the second-leading scorer for Northeastern during his senior season as the Huskies finished a disappointing sixth in Hockey East. McNeely skated in all 38 games for the Huskies and had 13 goals with 21 assists and was +9 with 52 PMs. McNeely scored five times on the power play for the Huskies.

Talent Analysis

McNeely has average size and was not a highly sought after college free agent. He has very good hands and tremendous finishing ability. He can fill in wherever he is needed and is very solid on the penalty kill.

Future

McNeely is long shot to make the Islanders, but could fill in as a solid bottom-six forward with the Islanders when needed.

Hurricanes Draft Preview

by Kirk Pedersen
on
Dating back to their days in Hartford, the franchise hasn’t always been the best drafting team in NHL History.
Nobody is perfect, but the list of first-round blunders in the Whalers/Canes history is rather long.

It all began back in 1979. The former New England Whalers were just out of the crumbled World Hockey Association, and looking to make a name for themselves in the NHL.

With their first pick in franchise history, they selected smallish WHL scoring ace Ray Allison. On the surface, it looked like an airtight pick; Allison had been among the top scorers in the WCHL (now WHL) for three years, and there wasn’t much to suggest that he wouldn’t be a solid point producer for the Whalers in the future, Right?

Unfortunately, wrong. Allison was never able to achieve his full potential with the Hartford organization. He was dealt to Philadelphia in 1982 after only two full seasons in the organization, and topped out at 54 points, with the ’81-’82 Flyers.

Also a part of that deal was the Whalers first-rounder the next season, Fred Arthur. Arthur, a big, hulking defenseman from the Cornwall Royals of the OMJHL, racked up 75 points in his final season of junior. (5g, 70(!)a) He, too looked like a foolproof pick, but many didn’t believe his offensive prowess at the junior level would transfer on to the pro level. He, as previously mentioned, was a part of that big deal that sent fellow then-Whalers-prospect Ray Allison to Philly. Arthur would never realize his potential at the NHL level. He retired after the ’82-83 season, only amass Read more»

Take Your Pick

by Shane Walsh
on





Mighty Ducks of Anaheim Draft Preview

by pbadmin
on

The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim have the fifth overall pick in the 2001 NHL Entry Draft. Past top 5 picks have included: Paul Kariya (4), Oleg Tverdovsky (2), Chad Kilger (4), and Vitaly Vishnevski (5). With three of the four playing well with the NHL club, the 2001 draft brings a lot of optimism.

Short of free agency, the Anaheim club needs help at defense, right wing, and at center. If Ilja Bryzgalov (Russia) comes to Cincinnati (not likely) the Cincy Ducks will be solid in goal. With this lack of depth in the system it appears that the top player available will be chosen not just with the 5th pick but also throughout the draft. This has always been Pierre Gauthier’s strategy in the past.

The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim will select the best player available at #5, which will most likely be Chistov or Weiss.

The Ducks have two early/mid picks in the second round (35 and 41). Gauthier has mentioned that he would like to trade one of them and/or other lower picks to get some established players with grit and/or leadership characteristics.

In addition to the Ducks first (5) and second (5,11) round picks the Ducks also have three fourth round picks (5, 8, 19), one 5th (5), one 6th (5), one 7th (28), one 8th (5) and one 9th round pick (5).

B’s need to address weaknesses in system in draft

by pbadmin
on

The Boston Bruins should be entering this year’s draft with the following goals in mind:

1. Increase depth in goal

2. Improve defensive prospects
Read more»

Lightning 2001 draft preview

by Chad Schnarr
on

In the ever-active mind of Lightning General Manager Rick Dudley, there is a certain make-up a player must posses if he is to join one of the up-and-coming teams of the NHL. Knowing the history of the Lightning, one could assume that would be “knew how to skate,” and left it there. Seeing how 1996 first rounder Mario Larocque turned out, even that wasn’t always followed.

That was then, this is now. Dudley is looking for a few key ingredients in prospects to set them apart from the others. Primarily, he wants size, he wants speed and he wants skill. Secondarily, he would prefer a nasty streak and a well-rounded, defensive game already in place. In other words, the prospect must be able to find their own zone without the use of a map or asking a linesman for directions.

Normally when drafting in the top end of the first round, the plan of attack is common sense; take the best player available and if he doesn’t work out or you’re loaded at that position – deal accordingly. As more attention is made to prospects’ strength and development, especially in Europe (Dudley has made known his admiration for the developmental programs overseas, specifically Russia. This evidenced by 5/10 picks last year from Russia, 2 North American.), the more prospects are becoming closer to NHL readiness. Because of that, the more “need” creeps into the equation. Such is the case for Tampa, considering their shallow forward lines and strong draft position.

The Lightning need help filling holes up front and Dudley thinks this draft can help. In other Read more»

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