Tyler McNeely

Hometown:

Burnaby British Columbia

Currently Playing In:

Pro

Birthday:

1987-04-08

Position:

C

Eligible for draft:

2005

Shoots:

Left

Drafted:

Height:

5-10

Acquired:

Free agent signing, 2011

Weight:

175 lbs.

Probability of Success
  • D

History

2008-09: McNeely appeared in 34 games for Northeastern as a sophomore – missing seven games late in the season with a sprained ankle. He scored 8 goals with 12 assists and was +10 with 71 PMs. Northeastern finished second in Hockey East during the regular season – the school's first winning season since 2001-02 – and faced Cornell in an NCAA regional semifinal.

2009-10: McNeely was a team captain and skated in 33 of 34 games as a junior at Northeastern. He was the third-leading scorer for the Huskies, who finished ninth in Hockey East and missed the league playoffs. He scored 12 goals, including 6 power play goals, with 16 assists and was -3 with 42 PMs.

2010-11: McNeely made his professional debut on an amateur tryout with Bridgeport (AHL) following his senior season at Northeastern and impressed Islanders brass enough to earn a free agent contract. In ten games for the last-place Sound Tigers he scored 5 goals with 6 assists and was +9 with 4 PMs. McNeely was the second-leading scorer for Northeastern during his senior season as the Huskies finished a disappointing sixth in Hockey East. McNeely skated in all 38 games for the Huskies and had 13 goals with 21 assists and was +9 with 52 PMs. McNeely scored five times on the power play for the Huskies.

Talent Analysis

McNeely has average size and was not a highly sought after college free agent. He has very good hands and tremendous finishing ability. He can fill in wherever he is needed and is very solid on the penalty kill.

Future

McNeely is long shot to make the Islanders, but could fill in as a solid bottom-six forward with the Islanders when needed.

From the Editor: News and Notes

by Mark Fischel
on

To start off, I want to extend a heartfelt thanks to all of our regular readers who visit us regularly, some even several times a day. One thing that I keep noticing is that this site has quite a family atmosphere with several hundred of you making your presence felt on the HFBoards site, comments on the articles, or in letters to our staff.

Our goal for Hockey’s Future is to provide a place for hockey fans of every level to come and get the hard-to-find information on their favorite prospects, teams, and leagues. For the most part, we feel that we have been successful in giving you more information than ever before on your favorite subjects, but we don’t intend to stop there.

Coming on Nov 28th will be our 2002 Draft Preview, which will have roughly 25 profiles and pictures on the top prospects for the 2002 NHL Entry Draft. Compiled by Jake Dole with the assistance of several of the league editors, this preview will take on a different look and feel from what we have usually done, so I welcome any feedback. With the publishing of the “2002 Draft Preview” will also be important news regarding the 2002 Draft Center’s launch dates. One thing is for sure, this years edition will be the most comprehensive one we have done yet.

Also being added over the next few weeks will be all-new polls on the team and league pages. Several of the teams (Florida, Rangers, Islanders, St. Louis, Anaheim,) have already been updated, and if your favorite team’s poll hasn’t been updated, send a letter to the Editor to remind them to get to me the new polls!

But the most Read more»

Who Really is Tom Poti?

by Lain Babcock
on

Saturday night, in his own zone, Tom Poti had the puck, dangerously close to the Oilers net with guys in the wrong uniform all about. Poti pushed the puck up, as if offering it to the opposition, saying “you know, if you try one more time, I bet you can beat Salo”. I came to this site, to post some well worded attack on him, but decided all it would do is cause pro-Poti reactions or “I hear ya” responses.

So, I’ve spent the last two days or so going through NHL history, looking for a clue as to how this story is going to turn out. I asked myself this question:

Who, in the last 30 years, most resembles Tom Poti in both potential and in frustration? How did his career turn out? Did they move him to forward? Did they trade him? Did they hang him? Did they run over him with a large tank? Did they yell at him? Did they protect him? Was he a fan favourite?

I looked long and hard, and came up with three nominees, all of whom played 20 years ago. This works well because we can see how their careers turned out. I’ll mention them in reverse order:

3. Ron Greschner: From Goodsoil, SK, he played in the WHL with New Westminster, and once drafted spent 7 games in the AHL before coming up to the New York Rangers. There’s a long standing rumour that NYR GM Emile Francis spread a rumour that Greschner had a bad injury, which dropped his stock. Have no idea if it’s true. Anyway, Greschner scored 8-37-45 as a rookie, with almost 100 minutes in penalties. This was 74-75, so I’d guess a few of those PIM were of the five minute variety; when posted next to Poti’s rooki Read more»

Under the Helmet: Canadian Olympic Dilemma

by Jason Hegler
on

It appears that Wayne Gretzky and company have a difficult task regarding the selection of players that will represent Canada in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Many writers and fans alike are beginning to question some of the decisions made by our hockey brass. Some cross-examine the merit of the first eight players named to the Canadian squad while others lobby for players who have shone during the infancy of this year’s campaign. Statistically, the “elite eight” have done anything but excel this year which leaves one scratching his/her head as these players have been consummate leaders both on and off score sheets for numerous years. One also must wonder if there is an upcoming group of individuals ready to challenge our definitions of excellence or whether there is another solution to this strange phenomenon.

With almost a quarter of this year’s schedule behind us it seems strange to see the likes of Iginla, O’Neill and Parrish topping sacred categories such as goals, assists and plus minus. To get the full flavour, lets delve deeper into the accomplishments of the players who have already been awarded positions on the Canadian roster. The following player statistics are of November 12/01.

Scott Niedermayer 12 gp 3g 2a 5p +9

Chris Pronger 16 gp 1g 7a 8p -1

Rob Blake 18 gp 3g 8a 11p -4

Owen Nolan 16 gp 6g 7a 13p 0

Joe Sakic 18 gp 7g 8a 15p -4

Mario Lemieux 9 gp 1g 7a 8p -4

Steve Yzerman 18 gp 4g 11a 15p +4

Paul Kariya 16 gp 6g 8a 14p +1

Totals: 123 gp 3 Read more»

Bell’s ringing in Ottawa

by Stephen J. Holodinsky
on

If there is one thing that stands out about Brendan Bell it is his skating ability. He “has a powerful stride (and is) able to catch up on opposing breaking players” and is lateral movement “very good, probably his forte.” He goes on to say that “Bell’s defensive positioning is key to his defensive success and uses his exceptional side-to-side movement to block out opposition players.”

However, there is more to the Leaf’s 3rd round pick than that. Bell also comes with a burgeoning transition game included. His first pass is almost always a safe one by choice which is a comfort to a good many coaches who more often than not have to try to hammer that point home. While Dole points out that “(he) might need to become increasingly aggressive to create more offense,” he also goes on to say that Bell is “very good as the trailer (and his) puck control allows for few turnovers in the neutral zone.”

The rearguard while possessing a great slapshot and wristshot from the point “might need to shoot more” according to Dole who explains that “a typical Brendan Bell shot is a low wrister through traffic (which is) very effective in terms of tips.” As for his puck control once in the offensive zone this and stopping it from getting out over the blueline are again marked as strengths and part of what the writer terms “great offensive instincts and anticipation.”

Be that as it may, there are things that the blueliner can improve on. While “his ability to read plays quickly allows him to position himself and find loose pucks” helps him out in front of the net, the corner Read more»

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