Team Depth Chart of NHL Prospects
Strengths
  • Strong character players
  • Two-way awareness among forwards
  • Offensive, puck-moving defensemen
Weaknesses
  • Very few shutdown defenders
  • Little high-end scoring potential from forward group
  • Depth at left wing in the minors

About Prospect Scores and Probability

Prospect Criteria

Legend of Players' Leagues
Pro
Playing in N.A. Pro (NHL, AHL, ECHL, etc.)
CHL
Playing in CHL (OHL, QMJHL, WHL)
NCAA
Playing in NCAA
Europe
Playing in Europe
Junior
Playing in Junior 'A' (USHL, BCHL, AJHL, etc.)
N/A
Not Categorized Yet

Goaltenders

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Fredrik Bergvik Europe 6.5 D
2. Troy Grosenick Pro 6.0 C
3. J.P. Anderson Pro 5.5 B

Right Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Nikolay Goldobin CHL 7.5 D
2. Daniil Tarasov Pro 7.0 F
3. Eriah Hayes Pro 6.5 C
4. Alex Schoenborn CHL 6.0 D
5. Kevin Labanc CHL 6.0 D
6. Max Gaede NCAA 3.0 B
7. Chris Crane Pro 3.0 C

Left Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Tye McGinn Pro 7.0 C
2. Gabryel Boudreau CHL 7.0 F
3. Emil Galimov Europe 6.5 D
4. Barclay Goodrow CHL 6.0 C
5. Petter Emanuelsson Europe 6.0 D
6. Dylan Sadowy CHL 6.0 D

Centers

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Tomas Hertl Pro 8.0 B
2. Chris Tierney CHL 7.5 C
3. Dan O'Regan NCAA 7.5 D
4. Rylan Schwartz Pro 7.0 D
5. Cody Ferriero NCAA 6.5 C
6. Noah Rod Europe 6.5 C
7. Travis Oleksuk Pro 6.5 D
8. Ryan Carpenter Pro 6.5 D
9. Sean Kuraly NCAA 6.0 B
10. Freddie Hamilton Pro 6.0 B
11. Rourke Chartier CHL 6.0 C
12. Colin Blackwell NCAA 4.0 B
13. Jake Jackson Junior 2.0 C

Defensemen

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Matt Tennyson Pro 7.5 C
2. Mirco Mueller CHL 7.5 C
3. Dylan DeMelo Pro 7.0 C
4. Konrad Abeltshauser Pro 7.0 C
5. Michael Brodzinski NCAA 7.0 C
6. Julius Bergman Europe 7.0 C
7. Joakim Ryan NCAA 6.0 C
8. Alexis Vanier CHL 6.0 C
9. Isaac MacLeod NCAA 6.0 D
10. Taylor Doherty Pro 6.0 D
11. Gage Ausmus NCAA 5.5 C
12. Cliff Watson NCAA 4.0 C

Sharks 2002 draft review

by Mike Delfino
on

The 2002 NHL Entry Draft was certainly an interesting one for the San Jose Sharks, headed by GM Dean Lombardi and Director of Amateur Scouting Tim Burke
With seven picks in the draft, the Sharks chose five players from the US, a highly unusual route. In 2000, the Sharks went with a rather unusual theme, selecting Marcel Goc, Christian Ehrhoff and Dimitri Patzold, all out of Germany. In 1999, the Sharks went with the college theme, selecting Jeff Jillson, Willie Levesque, and Niko Dimitrakos. So far, both of those “theme drafts” have turned out positive for the Sharks.

Whether or not the high school theme of 2002 will enjoy the same success is impossible to tell from the outset.

Name: Mike Morris
Draft Spot: 1st Round: 27th Overall
Position: Right Wing
Shoots: Right
Size: 6’1” 185 pounds
DOB: 07-14-1983
CSS Final Rank: 57th among North American Skaters
Last Year’s Team: St. Sebastian High School (Massachusetts.) Read more»

“Making it by Choice, Not Force” HF Profiles Jeff Jillson

by Mike Delfino
on

When Jeff Jillson decided to leave the University of Michigan after his junior year last season, he had a specific goal in mind—to make himself as ready for his first professional hockey season as possible. Jillson spent most of the summer of 2001 in San Jose working out with the Sharks’ Strength and Conditioning Coordinator Mac Read, trying to prepare himself for the faster, bigger, and stronger competition at the professional level, but it’s not the first time he’s had to adjust and turn himself into a different player.

It was only four years ago that many felt he would have been better suited to play in the Canadian Hockey League as opposed to college, but Jillson decided not only to make the decision that was best for his hockey career, but also what was best for his own personal development.

“I saw a few games in the junior leagues and then I saw a couple in the college leagues and figure I got the best of both worlds, (I got to) play a high level of hockey and at the same time continue my education,” said Jillson. “The thing is at Michigan is that you get so much exposure even though it’s a college team as far as hockey goes and you can get the best of both worlds to continue to work on your game as well as continue on with your education, so it works out pretty well.”

In another sign of Jillson’s constant strive for improvement, not just in hockey, but in life, Jillson recently registered for classes on the Internet at Michigan where he was a constant All-Academic selection. He said that the early plan is to do most of his coursework Read more»

Next in Line for the Sharks

by Mike Delfino
on

The importance of a team’s depth at all positions was proven last year when at various times in the season many of the Sharks top players such as Owen Nolan, Vincent Damphousse and Steve Shields missed games due to injuries or suspensions. Without the contributions of players like Tony Granato, Jim Montgomery and Bill Lindsay, it is hard to say where the Sharks would have finished in the playoff race. Particularly Granato filled a role where he patched holes where necessary; ending up playing 61 games in what will likely be his last NHL season.

As the Sharks close in on training camp, the core of their team remains in tact. The addition of Adam Graves and the retention of Gary Suter gives the Sharks four solid scoring lines and three experienced defensive pairings. The only players still unsigned are defenseman Mike Rathje, center Patrick Marleau, and right wing Todd Harvey.

While the Sharks have prospects such as Marcel Goc and Jeff Jillson who are considered solid to blue chip prospects, if in need of help, players such as these may not necessarily be the best choice, as further playing time in various developmental leagues may be in order, or in the case of players in college or playing in CHL, can’t play in the NHL even if they were ready.

Last season it was the Sharks forward lines that were plagued by the injury bug. With Nolan missing 25 games due to various injuries and a 12-game suspension by the NHL, and Damphousse missing almost half the season with a shoulder injury, the Sharks were without their two best players, much of which at the s Read more»

Sharks Swimming in Goaltenders

by Mike Delfino
on
In 1999, if you were to ask me which position were the San Jose Sharks
weakest at I would have easily answered goaltending. With Miikka
Kiprusoff still in Europe and Evgeni Nabokov a serious question mark, it
was a concern.

Now fast-forwarding to 2001, one can make an easy case that the Sharks
are most comfortable between the pipes. With Nabokov winning the Calder
Trophy as the league’s best rookie in 2001 and Kiprusoff who is
considered one of the best young goalies in the game, the Sharks have
two young goaltenders considered at the top of their position among
young players. In addition, they have Vesa Toskala who will be the next
starting goaltender next season in Cleveland, the Sharks’ new AHL
affiliate, and Nolan Schaefer who is quickly turning heads at Providence
College.

When a team drafts a player in the ninth round they hope that he will
make it to their AHL team. If he can make any kind of impact in the
AHL, that pick is considered a success. Rarely does a ninth round pick
make a serious impact in the NHL, in fact, most fans would be hard
pressed to name ten players currently making an impact in the NHL chosen
so late. However, Shark fans can easily name two, center Mark Smith
chosen in 1997, and Nabokov chosen with the 194th pick in 1994.

For a long time Nabokov was considered to be a typical ninth round
selection-a player who would struggle for a while and once he did make
it to Kentucky of the AHL, in all likelihood only make it as a backup.
He struggled immensely in his first season with Kentucky Read more»

Sharks Top 10 List

by Mike Delfino
on
As the 2001 NHL Entry Draft has now concluded, teams look at their
prospects to determine where they stand in depth, skill, and overall
strength of their prospects.
The requirement for being on this list is simple: 25 games played or
less at the NHL level. I rank the players on two categories: 75% of
their ranking is obviously based on skill and 25% based on how quickly
the player will make an impact on the roster. After the player review
is listed where the player will likely play in 2001, followed by when I
expect them to be a regular on the Sharks.


1st:
Remaining atop the list of Sharks prospects is Jeff Jillson,
however, his lead is not as wide as it was last year. While Jillson has
done nothing to reduce his standing, others have improved theirs,
getting within arms reach of the top spot on the Sharks depth chart.
The winner of the CCHA Player of the Week for October 23rd, Jillson led
Michigan’s defense to second place with ten goals and 20 assists in 35
games, finishing the year on an impressive note in his offense. He
recorded a +17 on the season, and spent 74 minutes watching the game
from the penalty box.
While his offense has been down at times, the upside is that Jillson has
been playing a much smarter game than 99/00 and has been more
responsible defensively. He has refrained from committing the types of
penalties resulting of him not reading the play quick enough, then being
forced into a penalty to prevent a goal.
The main reason Jeff Jillson returned to Michigan last season was
toimprove his consistency an Read more»

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