Team Depth Chart of NHL Prospects
Strengths
  • Depth in goaltending
  • Many prospects ready for NHL
  • Depth at center
Weaknesses
  • Lack of depth and talent on wing

About Prospect Scores and Probability

Prospect Criteria

Legend of Players' Leagues
Pro
Playing in N.A. Pro (NHL, AHL, ECHL, etc.)
CHL
Playing in CHL (OHL, QMJHL, WHL)
NCAA
Playing in NCAA
Europe
Playing in Europe
Junior
Playing in Junior 'A' (USHL, BCHL, AJHL, etc.)
N/A
Not Categorized Yet

Goaltenders

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Andrey Makarov Pro 7.0 D
2. Linus Ullmark Europe 7.0 D
3. Nathan Lieuwen Pro 6.5 C
4. Jonas Johansson Europe 6.5 C
5. Cal Petersen NCAA 6.0 C

Right Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Joel Armia Pro 7.0 B
2. Justin Bailey CHL 7.0 D
3. Nick Baptiste CHL 7.0 D
4. Hudson Fasching NCAA 7.0 D
5. Vaclav Karabacek CHL 7.0 D
6. Jordan Samuels-Thomas Pro 6.5 C
7. Judd Peterson NCAA 6.0 D
8. Victor Olofsson Europe 6.0 D
9. Colin Jacobs Pro 5.0 D
10. Christian Isackson NCAA 5.0 D

Left Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Brendan Lemieux CHL 7.0 C
2. Nicolas Deslauriers Pro 7.0 D
3. Daniel Catenacci Pro 7.0 D
4. William Carrier Pro 7.0 D
5. Gustav Possler Europe 7.0 D
6. Max Willman NCAA 5.5 C
7. Brad Navin NCAA 5.0 D

Centers

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Sam Reinhart CHL 8.0 B
2. Mikhail Grigorenko Pro 7.5 C
3. JT Compher NCAA 7.0 C
4. Johan Larsson Pro 6.5 B
5. Connor Hurley NCAA 6.5 C
6. Sean Malone NCAA 6.5 C
7. Eric Cornel CHL 6.5 C
8. Justin Kea Pro 6.0 C
9. Phil Varone Pro 6.0 C
10. Tim Schaller Pro 6.0 C
11. Kevin Sundher Pro 6.0 D
12. Christopher Brown Junior 6.0 D

Defensemen

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Rasmus Ristolainen Pro 8.0 B
2. Jake McCabe Pro 7.5 C
3. Nikita Zadorov CHL 7.5 C
4. Mark Pysyk Pro 7.0 C
5. Chad Ruhwedel Pro 7.0 C
6. Brady Austin Pro 6.0 C
7. Anthony Florentino NCAA 6.0 C
8. Brycen Martin CHL 6.0 C
9. Jerome Gauthier-Leduc Pro 6.0 D
10. Mark Adams NCAA 5.0 D

Sabres Report: ’99 Training Camp Wrap-Up

by Ken McKenna
on

With the start of the Buffalo Sabres’ 1999-2000 season just hours away, it would probably be a good idea for this writer to tie up the loose ends left over from a mildly interesting training camp. Some new faces will be with the club to start the season, due mostly to the fact that four players are still holding out, but the 99-00 edition of the Sabres will still be pretty much the same team that made it to the 1999 Stanley Cup finals.

Sabres “Improve” On Last Year’s Pre-Season Effort

Okay, maybe improve is stretching things a bit, since the Sabres finished the exhibition slate with a 2-4-1 record. The Sabres coaching staff appeared to adopt the “Marv Levy Approach” to pre-season games, which means they used veterans sparingly while taking a long look at several younger players. While this approach virtually guarantees a losing pre-season record, it also gives the coaches a good idea of where their younger players are at in their development. Players such as Maxim Afinogenov, Cory Sarich, Brian Campbell and Domenic Pittis received plenty of playing time throughout the exhibition schedule, with some of those players making good use of the opportunity, and others making it clear they are in need of more playing time in the minors.
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Sabres Report: Training Camp Review, Part One

by Ken McKenna
on

Just three short months removed from their gut-wrenching Stanley Cup Final loss, the Buffalo Sabres opened their 1999 training camp with high hopes for a return to the Big Dance. Although some of the pieces to the puzzle are currently missing (free-agent holdouts), the Sabres have enough good prospects to keep things interesting during the drudgery of the exhibition season.

Prospect junkies view the NHL pre-season as a good time to evaluate where certain prospects are at in their development, so they look forward to receiving any scrap of information they can get regarding their favorite team’s prospects. People such as this writer are only too happy to provide the prospect junkies with their fix, but getting information from NHL training camps is sometimes easier said than done. In the case of the Buffalo Sabres, the embargo on information regarding the current camp has been truly disappointing. Given the small numbers of people that attend practices, as well as the limited number of news outlets covering camp, it has been somewhat difficult to cobble together worthwhile information on the play of some of the prospects in camp.

Still, rather than make excuses, I will take the information I have and present as accurately as I can the noteworthy events of the first two weeks of the Buffalo Sabres ’99 training camp.

“Defense? What’s that?”
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Sabres Report: Training Camp Preview

by Ken McKenna
on

With the beginning of the Buffalo Sabres ’99 training camp just a day away, this would be a good time to present a camp preview. The main purpose of this article will be to speculate which Sabre prospects, if any, will make a push to stay with the big club. The Sabres have seven restricted free agents, as well as one unrestricted free agent, so it is possible that some younger players will be thrown into the fire until the veterans arrive. Given the fact that the Sabres are coming off a Stanley Cup final appearance, however, it is unlikely that many of the prospects will make the Sabres roster on merit, since there would be few roster spots available without the training camp holdouts.

I’m going to break down each position, listing the incumbents (veterans) and prospects at each position, and follow that with a brief analysis identifying which prospects, if any, have an opportunity to make the Sabre roster. An asterisk (*) next to a name denotes either a restricted or unrestricted free agent. There will be instances where a player’s name will appear at more than one position, which means that the player is not exclusively used at a certain position.

Center

Incumbents

- Mike Peca, Curtis Brown *, Stu Barnes *, Wayne Primeau *, Joe Juneau *, Brian Holzinger

Prospects

- Mike Zigomanis, Brad Moran, Francois Methot, Aaron Goldade, Kamil Piros, Brad Self
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Sabres Report: Y’all Caught?

by Ken McKenna
on

The sweltering heat of the past couple months is now giving way to the cooler temperatures associated with the onset of fall. Before you know it, the leaves will be falling outside, while the sticks and gloves will be dropping in hockey rinks across North America.

While this writer was enjoying the fine Western New York summer weather, he was also neglecting his duties in keeping Buffalo Sabre fans abreast of any new developments with prospects in the Sabre organization. Helping fans get caught up won’t be difficult, however, as there has been little activity of note during the Sabre’s offseason. In the interest of keeping Sabre fans informed (as well as all readers of HF), this article will be devoted to pulling together some of the Sabre moves that have come to pass, as well as provide information regarding events which have yet to take place.

Prospect Signings
Sabre GM Darcy Regier has had his hands full attempting to re-sign several veterans, but he managed to find the time (and money) to sign Sabre prospects Jaroslav Kristek (RW), David Moravec (W) and Luc Theoret (D). Read more»

Heisten and Janik – The Sabres Maine Draft Picks

by pbadmin
on

Two of the most promising players the Sabres picked up in the 1999 draft are Buffalo’s first round selection Barrett Heisten (Left Wing, 20th overall), and one of their second round picks, Doug Janik (Defense, 55th overall). The two draft Sabre picks were both freshman standouts at the University of Maine and were cornerstones of the Black Bears’ 1999 NCAA Championship season. Heisten and Janik also played together in a National Development Program held last year.

Heisten, an Anchorage, Alaska native, seems to be a prototypical Buffalo Sabre. He turned down offers to play Major Junior so he could come to Maine. A lot of people were interested in him, as he is a player who can score and has speed, yet also possesses a nasty side. Sabres GM Darcy Regier stated that he “has some Rasmussen and Varada in him” (referring to gritty wingers Erik Rasmussen and Vaclav Varada). He stands at 6′ 1″, 191 lbs. and needs to work on his scoring; like the aforementioned Varada and Rasmussen, Heisten can score at times but can be very streaky. One has to keep in mind that the Barrett is only 18 and has time to develop. Up to this point he has tried to make up for a lack of scoring with speed, grit and tenacity and has been fairly successful at it. Heisten struggled early on in the 98-99 season but, after a strong performance at the ’99 World Junior Championships, he picked up his game tremendously and was named the Hockey East Player of the Month for his strong play during January.
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