AHL Complete Player Update

by Aaron Vickers


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Where are They Now, Switzerland: Part 2

by Joeri Loonen

Where are they now (Switzerland – part 2)

An overview of dfrafted players and undrafted players with an NHL-career currently active in the Swiss league(s).

Apart from the traditional big 5 (Finland, Sweden, Russia, Czech Republic, Slovakia) in Europe, Switzerland has made some siginificant progress the past few years and has established themselves as a genuine A-pool country. This upbeat is not only displayed on the national team level but as well in the Swiss Leagues (National Liga A and National Liga B). There are currently around 60 players which are either drafted or have had an NHL career playing in Switzerland, most of them being North-Americans. Where exactly are they playing now and what happened to them after they crossed the pond? An overview per NHL team

Edmonton Oilers:

Michel Riesen
Drafted 1997, 1st rnd, 14th overall Read more»

Russia WJC 2002: Plyuschev Places High Hopes on Chistov and Svitov

by Eugene Belashchenko

Plyuschev Places High Hopes on Chistov and Svitov

According to a Russian hockey newspaper Ves Hokkei, the head Coach of the Russian National Junior team, Vadimir Plyuschev, places a lot of his hopes on the two forwards from Avangard: Stanislav Chistov and Alexander Svitov.

Plyuschev: I hope to see Chistov and Svitov with the team. I am not discouraged by the fact that both players are not currently on the Hawks roster [Avangard Omsk –EB]. In my opinion, both players will fit well into the team and will really help us. Regarding another Avangard player, defenseman Kiril Koltsov, he will not be joining the team. At the same time I hope for reinforcements from North America. If nothing unforeseen happens, the National team will be complemented with Tyutin, Sapozhnikov and Yakubov. In comparison to the 4 Nations Tournament in Finland, it is not likely that other chances will take place in the line up.

Prospect Happenings in Hab-Land

by Chris Boucher
The Montréal press seems to be confused when it comes to Arron Asham’s performance this year in the AHL. Granted, he is playing well. He’s competing consistently and is leading the Citadelles in scoring with 23 points (9-14-23) in 24 games. But the reality of the situation is that Asham’s production is actually down this year compared to last season. He averaged 1.10 points per game through 15 AHL games last season.

The problem here isn’t with Asham or his game, but with the expectations this misunderstanding might bring. The 5’11”, 194-lbs Asham will likely never put up comparable numbers in the NHL. To assume so would be doing both he and the franchise an injustice. He wasn’t recalled based on his offensive production. Mainly it was due to injury problems combined with his increased competitiveness. Equally important is the fact that he’s a right-handed shot.

Lost in the Citadelles’ success, and more recently their lack of success has been the strong play of Marcel Hossa. He’s playing a solid overall game. The Slovakian is competing hard, and consistently putting his strong puck-protection skills on display. Although he’s not lighting it up offensively, he is getting his share of chances; he’s currently second on the team with 55 shots on goal. The adjustment to left wing has been relatively smooth, although his transition game (particularly along the half-boards in the defensive zone) could always use improvement.

The 20-year-old’s play comes into particular focus when we consider his relatively young age. If we look at w Read more»

Big trade for Kootenay, but at what price?

by Jeff Bromley

You get what you pay for, goes the old consumer’s adage. If you want quality, you have to give up quality, goes an old hockey adage. When Kootenay G.M. Jeff Chynoweth traded team captain Jason Jaffray along with Aaron Rome, Jeff Harvey and the club’s first round pick in next year’s Bantam Draft to Swift Current for B.J. Boxma, Duncan Milroy and a fifth round pick in the 2004 Bantam Draft, immediately those truths could be applied to the deal. The biggest question now is that, did the club sell its soul in order to improve itself in the areas needed most – goaltending? Did the ICE give up too much? That’s the $64,000 question.

This trade could turn out to be the most significant trade in the history of the ICE franchise. The club just dealt arguably the most popular, hardest working, trench warfare fighting, durable, community-minded player in the club’s history in Jason Jaffray. Aaron Rome and Jeff Harvey were big parts of the Kootenay ICE – there is no denying that fact – but both were with the club less than fourteen months. Rome, a talented d-man that seemed to be on the cusp of a breakout season, who went about his business in contributing to one of the best defensive corps this club has ever had. How much of a contributor Rome was to the ICE blueline depends on who you ask. Nevertheless, we are about to find out.

Harvey, an enigmatic goalie who never quite seemed to be able to step out of the shadow of Dan Blackburn. Yes, they were some big shoes to fill but what Harvey was unable to do was live up to the expectations of both team management and its fan Read more»

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