Calder Corner: Handicapping the Field

by HF Staff

The Calder Corner: Handicapping the Field-October

As part of the Calder Corner’s continuing coverage of this year’s NHL prospects, once a month Hockey’s Future will be handicapping the race for the Calder Trophy and presenting you with our Top Ten favourites for the league’s coveted Rookie of the Year Award. Therefore, without further ado CC’s inaugural picks for the silverware:

Last Month This Month Team Player
1 Kristian Huselius: Got off to a slow start due partially to a lack of line chemistry, partially due to a habit of looking for the perfect play. Once these problems were solved Huselius went on a tear of monster proportions that he is still in the middle of. With Pavel Bure slumping like he is, his timing has been flawless.
Read more»

ECHL Southern Conference Report

by Ron Valerino


PEE DEE : The Pride today announced that they have signed defenseman B. J.
Adams to a contract, and that they have released right wing Matt Van Arkel.
The Pride claimed Adams, 24, off of waivers from Jackson on Saturday. He
played all of last season with the Toledo Storm of the ECHL, and opened this
season with Toledo, but was released after appearing in one game. The
6-foot-2, 215 pound defenseman played in 69 games with the Storm last
season, registering two goals, 14 assists, and racking up 110 penalty
minutes. To make room for Adams on the roster, the Pride released rookie
forward Matt Van Arkel. In seven games, the Notre Dame graduate had one goal
and was a plus-one.

LOUISIANA: The IceGators goaltender Marc Magliarditi is the Goalie of the
Month for October. The 25-year-old Magliarditi was a perfect 4-0-0 with a
2.50 goals against average and a .912 save percentage while helping
Louisiana to the best start in team history, 6-0-1. Magliarditi, who was
drafted in the sixth round by the Chicago Blackhawks (146th overall) in
1995, opened the month making 23 saves in a 6-3 win at New Orleans in the
season opener, and improved to 2-0-0 with a 4-3 win against Arkansas on
October 14, making 28 saves. The Niagara Falls, N.Y. native made 32 saves in
a 5-2 win at Jackson on October 20 and closed out the month making 20 saves
in a 5-2 win at Mississippi. He finished the month stopping 103 of 113

MISSISSIPPI : The Sea Wolves announced that forward John Evangelist Read more»

The AHL – What’s Next?

by AHL Report Staff

The Habs’ minor league recipe for major league success

by Chris Boucher
Many people in hockey, and by extension the entire sports world feel that winning is a learned ability. Of course it is first and foremost the product of talent, but it also comes from confidence, and leadership. The two latter characteristics are normally acquired through experience, and can therefore be thought of as part of this learning “curve”.

The Québec Citadelles’ recent success can only help the Montréal Canadiens long-term. This is a franchise with the highest percentage of Montréal owned talent since the team’s inception.

Only 51% of the 1999-2000 Citadelles roster (the first year of its renewal) contained players with direct ties, or contracts with the Canadiens organization. This team finished the season with a 37-38-5 record, and 83 points. It was then eliminated in 3 straight games during the first round of the AHL playoffs.

The percentage increased to 74 % last year. This team finished with a 41-36-3 record, and 89 points. It went on to enjoy some success during the playoffs, but ultimately lost to the eventual Calder Cup champion St. John Flames.

The current team has increased this percentage to an impressive 85%. Twenty-two of the 26 players to dress for the Citadelles this season hold Montréal contracts, and all except for 3 were acquired (but not necessarily drafted) by Rejean Houle. Five of these players are former 1st round picks, while 3 others were chosen in the 2nd round. This could be considered a negative as it demonstrates an inability for some of the team’s top picks to make a quick jump to the NHL Read more»

Back to the ‘Future Considerations’

by Jeff Bromley

Back to the ‘Future Considerations’

In the game of hockey, from the Junior ‘B’ level though Major Junior right up into the NHL, the practice of trading players has always been a part of the game. Not exactly earthshattering news as any hockey afficionado would tell you that it’s as much a part of the game as curved sticks and frozen discs of rubber. Hockey, unlike other major sports in North America, trading is an integral part of the sport. Likely because of the use of salary caps and advent of true free agency is more prominent in the other big three sports of Basketball, Football (NFL) and Baseball. The NFL had its trading deadline go by the other day without a single deal being made. I don’t think anyone even noticed. Whereas in hockey, trading is still a major contributing factor in composing a team and in junior it’s even more of an imposing factor. Perhaps that’s why fans of the game tend to get wrapped up in the inner workings of the sport almost as much as the actual games themselves.

Who’s going where and for what? It’s a phenomenon almost exclusive to the sport of hockey, until the trading deadline of course.

A few trades of late in the WHL have brought on some confusion to some in the sense of not ‘who’s going where’ but rather ‘who’s coming back’ or ‘wasn’t he with???’.

Confusion meaning that the players that were supposed to have already been traded have somehow ended up back with their clubs of origin and then traded again.

Just before last year’s trading deadline the Regina Pats, in building their club for an Read more»

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