Kings Organizational Roster

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                      LOS ANGELES KINGS ORGANIZATIONAL ROSTER
"Tough to Play Against."
As of April 7, 2000

Owners: Philip F. Anschutz and Edward P. Roski Jr.
Governor: Robert Sanderman
President/Alternate Governor: Timothy J. Leiweke
Senior Vice President/General Manager: Dave Taylor
Assistant General Manager: Kevin Gilmore
Assistant to the General Manager: John Wolf
Director of Player Personnel: Bill O'Flaherty
Director of Amateur Scouting: Al Murray
Director of Professional Scouting: Ace Bailey
Scouting Staff: Serge Aubry, Greg Dreschel, Gary Harker, Rob Laird, Vaclav
Nedomansky, Parry Shockey, John Stanton, Victor Tjumenev and Ari Vuori
TV Commentators: Bob Miller and Jim Fox
Radio Commentators: Nick Nickson and Daryl Evans
Head Coach: Andy Murray
Assistant Coaches: Ray Bennett Mark Hardy Dave Tippett
Goaltending Consultant: Don Edwards
Trainer: Peter Demers ATC
Captain: D Rob Blake
Alternates: D Garry Galley and LW Luc Robitaille
Arena: Staples Center [18,500]
Training Center: Healthsouth Training Center
Team Colors: Purple White Black and Silver
Affiliates Lowell AHL, Long Beach IHL Mississippi ECHL and Trenton ECHL
Flagship Station: KRLA-AM 111 [Los Angeles]
Radio Network: KBET 1220 AM Santa Maria, CA, KGEO 1230 AM Bakersfield, CA,
KHJJ 1380 AM Palmdale/Lancaster, CA, KSHP 1400 AM Las Vegas, NV, KAMP 1430 Read more»

Scorin’ Goren looking to make it big In Beantown

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Lee Goren was once a forgotten man. No longer. Goren, the 2000 NCAA Tournament MVP, is also the 3rd round draft pick Washington traded to Boston in the infamous Adam Oates deal way back in March of 1997. Until now, that part of the trade has garnered little attention, but with the year Goren had with the Fighting Sioux of North Dakota in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association, there is reason to be optimistic in Boston about the sturdy winger’s future with the Bruins. With 60 goals in his last 82 games, many of those coming at crucial moments, his teammates and fans have affectionately taken to calling the Winnipeg native “Scorin’ Goren.”
In the 1997 draft, the Bruins called Lee Goren’s name 63rd overall(their 5th choice)even though he had not played in the entire 1996-97 college season after spending the previous year with the Minot Top Guns of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League and seeing action in two games as well with the Saskatoon Blades of the Western Hockey League. In the SJHL, Goren demonstrated a nose for the net and the type of toughness that every team looks for in a player. Until recently, Goren had been playing in relative anonymity on the talented and well-coached University of North Dakota teams under Dean Blais. In 1998-99, Lee led the Fighting Sioux in goal scoring with 26 tallies in 38 games. This year, Goren eclipsed his scoring totals from all of last season with 34 goals and 63 points in 44 games. Goren found his scoring touch at the right moment, posting 6-3-9 totals in three WCHA playoff games and making a name for himself as a b Read more»

Finnish Goaltenders

by Bill Meltzer
on
Finland has produced some of the NHL’s top forwards of the 1980s and 1990s, most notably Jari Kurri and Teemu Selänne. There have also been Finnish defensemen who have emerged as top-quality NHL players, ranging from Reijo Ruotsalainen to Teppo Numminen. For some reason, however, there have been very few Finnish goalies to make it to the NHL and, as yet, there has not been a single Finnish impact goalie in the NHL. Only Jarmo Myllys, Kari Takko, Jari Kaarela, and Hannu Kampurri have ever so much as started an NHL regular season game. Myllys and Takko represent the (modest) pinnacle of success that Finnish keepers have had in the NHL.

In the meantime, every other major European hockey country has produced at least one regular starting goalie in the NHL. The former Czechoslovakia developed Dominik Hasek and Roman Turek. Sweden gave us Pelle Lindbergh and Tommy Salo. Russia produced Nikolai Khabibulin (not to mention the legendary Vladislav Tretiak, who would have been an NHL star if the political climate of the time had allowed it). Moreover, even some of the lesser NHL goalies from the other European countries, such as Tommy Söderström, Mikhail Shtalenkov, and Petr Skudra, experienced NHL success that was equal or superior to the North American accomplishments of Takko and Myllys.
Read more»

Mike Jones Signs with NHL’s Tampa Bay Lightning

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Former NAHL Most Valuable Defenseman Heads to Pros from Bowling Green

For Immediate Release – Thursday, April 6, 2000

The North American Hockey League has announced that former NAHL defenseman Mike Jones has signed a free-agent
contract with the Tampa Bay Lightning of the National Hockey League. Terms of the contract were not disclosed.
A 6-4, 195-pound native of Toledo, OH, Jones, 23, spent the past four seasons at Bowling Green State University of the
Central Collegiate Hockey Association. He tallied six goals and 13 assists for 19 points with 71 penalty minutes in 34 games
with Bowling Green this season as an assistant captain, and also helped BGSU to a first-round playoff upset of Lake Superior
State University.
Jones, who collected 18-52—70 points and 167 PIM in 127 career outings with the Falcons, will join former NAHL and
BGSU star Brian Holzinger in Tampa Bay. The Buffalo Sabres traded Holzinger, the 1995 Hobey Baker Memorial Award
winner as the top player in U.S. college hockey, to the Lightning last month.
Jones played two years with the NAHL’s Cleveland Barons, recording 15-33—48 points as a rookie left wing in
1994-95. He switched to the blueline the following season and notched 25-45—70 points in 46 outings while also serving
as Cleveland’s team captain. He led all league defensemen in points that year, led all NAHL players in assists, and Read more»

The Next Phenomenon: Jay Bouwmeester

by Trenton Allen
on

When you see this kid play, you know you are seeing greatness. He can
skate with the best of them, make tape-to-tape passes blindfolded, and his
vision of the ice and the play that is unfolding is unsurpassed. Who am I
talking about? Who else. Jay Bouwmeester.

This 16 year old star in the making of the Medicine Hat Tigers has just
finished his first season in the WHL. Few defensemen before have stepped in
at his age and done as much as this young man. Quarterbacked the powerplay,
got to play some shorthanded situations, and was often a catalyst on a team
that many nights was severely lacking in the offensive department.
Bouwmeester finished his season with 64 games, 13 goals, 21 assists and 34
points. The assists total would have been much higher on a team that had a
few finishers. Next year, with players such as Ryan Hollweg gaining in
experience, watch that total rise. Probably the best part of watching him
play is that you get the felling that, as good as he is, he’s capable of so
much more. When ever he gets the puck you get on the edge of your seat not
know if your going to see just another dump-in, or watch Bouwmeester make a
brilliant end-to-end rush. Probably the best thing about watching him play,
and the worst thing for all other teams in the WHL, is that you know that
he’s only scratched the surface of what he can do.

If any reporters are reading this article, here’s a little advice about Read more»