Team Depth Chart of NHL Prospects
Strengths
  • Surplus of role players
  • Talented depth in goal
  • Several prospects with high-end potential
Weaknesses
  • Thin on defense and left wing
  • Shallow pool in terms of overall NHL potential.

About Prospect Scores and Probability

Prospect Criteria

Legend of Players' Leagues
Pro
Playing in N.A. Pro (NHL, AHL, ECHL, etc.)
CHL
Playing in CHL (OHL, QMJHL, WHL)
NCAA
Playing in NCAA
Europe
Playing in Europe
Junior
Playing in Junior 'A' (USHL, BCHL, AJHL, etc.)
N/A
Not Categorized Yet

Goaltenders

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Philipp Grubauer Pro 7.5 C
2. Ed Pasquale Pro 7.0 D
3. Sergei Kostenko Pro 6.0 D
4. Brandon Anderson Pro 5.5 D

Right Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Riley Barber NCAA 7.0 C
2. Austin Wuthrich NCAA 6.5 D
3. Garrett Mitchell Pro 6.0 C

Left Wing

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Andre Burakovsky CHL 8.0 C
2. Chris Brown Pro 7.0 C
3. Zach Sanford Junior 7.0 D
4. Stanislav Galiev Pro 6.5 D

Centers

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Evgeny Kuznetsov Europe 8.0 C
2. Chandler Stephenson CHL 7.0 D
3. Thomas Di Pauli NCAA 6.5 C
4. Caleb Herbert Pro 6.5 D
5. Brian Pinho Junior 6.5 D
6. Michael Latta Pro 6.0 B
7. Travis Boyd NCAA 6.0 D

Defensemen

League Prosp. talent Prob. of success
1. Madison Bowey CHL 7.5 C
2. Connor Carrick Pro 7.0 D
3. Nate Schmidt Pro 7.0 D
4. Christian Djoos Europe 6.5 C
5. Patrick Wey Pro 6.5 C
6. Tyler Lewington CHL 6.5 C
7. Chay Genoway Pro 6.5 D
8. Cameron Schilling Pro 6.5 D
9. Tomas Kundratek Pro 6.5 D
10. Blake Heinrich Junior 6.0 C
11. Garrett Haar CHL 6.0 D
12. Patrick Koudys NCAA 5.5 C

Washington Capitals Off-Season Preview

by Jeff Charlesworth
on
The Capitals have already had a busy off-season, but the biggest moves are yet to come. Many of the changes so far have affected the minor league system, leaving the NHL roster intact. However, with six big-name Restricted Free Agents and the potential for some blockbuster trades very soon – the Caps could have a different look for 2000-01.

As with the rest of the league, the Capitals had to sign their 1998 draft picks by June 1st or lose the rights to them. George McPhee got things started early by signing collegiate defenseman Michael Farrell in March. Then, right at the deadline, the Caps came to terms with Krys Barch, Nathan Forster and Rastislav Stana. They are all expected to play minor pro next season, and the Caps have high hopes for all of them. This meant that the remaining 1998 draft picks: Goaltender Jomar Cruz, Forwards Blake Evans and Todd Hornung re-entered the 2000 draft. None of them were selected, and they will look for Free Agent deals during the summer.
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Washington Capitals 2000 Draft in Review

by Jeff Charlesworth
on

The Washington Capitals surprised no one with the players they selected early on in the 2000 Entry Draft. The top three selections all came from the Western Hockey League, where the Caps have gone for several high picks before. The unexpected moves came when the Capitals made four trades involving nine draft picks and one player – 1995 first-rounder Miika Elomo. Elomo had survived Friday’s expansion draft and was expected to make the jump to the NHL next season.

In the first round (26th overall), they chose Brian Sutherby from Moose Jaw. He is a two-way center, and is very physical. The Caps needed more offensive forwards, but could not pass on Sutherby. He suffered a shoulder injury in November and missed some time. He plays a similar style to current Capital Jeff Halpern, but is a bit bigger.

With the first of their two second-round picks (43rd overall), the Capitals grabbed Matt Pettinger. He is a big winger who has some offensive ability. He left college mid-season to enter the WHL and scored seven goals in his first 12 games. He is the fourth member of the 1999-2000 Calgary Hitmen on the Capitals’ reserve list – joining Kris Beech, Rastislav Stana and
Stephen Peat.

The other second-round pick (61st overall) was used to select big defenseman Jakub Cutta from Swift Current. He is an stay-at-home defenseman but likes to carry the puck. He is originally from the Czech Republic, but has adjusted to the North American game very quickly.

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Capitals Look Back – Scott Stevens

by Jeff Charlesworth
on
Watching Scott Stevens raise his second Stanley Cup in five years was extremely painful for long-time Capitals fans. They remember that ten years ago, the Caps let him walk to St. Louis in the first big name – and arguably the largest ever – NHL Free Agent signing. The decision to let Stevens go has been widely criticized, but the Capitals had their reasons at the time. With the power of hindsight, we can look back and try to determine if the Capitals made the right choice.

Scott was the Capitals first round pick in 1982, 5th overall. By that fall, he was already patrolling the blueline in DC and became a force to be reckoned with. In 1990, he was part of a solid Caps defence corps that also featured Rod Langway, Kevin Hatcher and Calle Johansson. Although he was only 26 years old, Scott was an 8-year NHL veteran and 2-time All-Star. The Blues offered to pay him what was considered an obscene amount at that time: $5.1 million over 4 years. In comparison, eight days earlier in Major League Baseball, Jose Canseco and the Oakland Athletics agreed to a 5 year contract worth $23.5 million.
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Washington Capitals Entry Draft Preview

by Jeff Charlesworth
on

George McPhee and the Washington Capitals enter the 2000 entry draft without the luxury of
multiple high selections like they did a year ago. It would be difficult to beat last year’s
effort anyway, as the Class of 1999 looks as though they will make a huge impact on the future in
DC. Not including the “Top 5″, in which the Caps chose five of the first 37 players, McPhee
uncovered a gem in the fifth round by the name of Roman Tvrdon – who had possibly the best
season of any Capitals prospect. He also found two promising defensemen in the later rounds:
David Johansson and Igor Shadilov. If he can continue his success of selecting quality players
in the later rounds, the Capitals should make this draft a success as well.

The Capitals will select 26th in the first round, and have ten selections in all. They traded
their third-rounder to Colorado in the Dale Hunter deal, and their fourth to Anaheim for Stephen
Peat. They also sent their seventh-round selection to Chicago in return for a late pick which
they used to select Shadilov a year ago. The Caps gain a compensatory fourth-round pick as the
“Future Considerations” from the Joe Juneau trade. They also receive Tampa Bay’s seventh-round
pick as part of the Jaroslav Svejkovsky deal, Calgary’s seventh-rounder in return for Tom
Chorske, and an eighth-round pick from New Jersey for Ken Sutton.

There are a few trends that McPhee seems to have shown in his three drafts so far. First of Read more»

Capitals Draft Look Back – 1996

by Jeff Charlesworth
on

With the entry draft on the horizon, and the Capitals coming off what might be their best draft ever, I thought I would take a look back at what is considered the Caps’ worst draft of the 1990s. In 1996, Washington had twelve picks – including seven of the top 100. Not only that, but there was an NHL-calibre player on the board every time their turn came up. Now, just four years later, they have only one player to show for it.

This season the Capitals dealt former first round picks Alexandre Volchkov to Edmonton and Jaroslav Svejkovsky to Tampa Bay. That left the Capitals with young centre Jan Bulis as the only player under contract from their entire 1996 draft.

Washington held all of their picks 1 through 9 except the 4th rounder (98th) that they traded to Colorado for Anson Carter. They had acquired four extra selections through trades: L.A.’s 1st (4th overall ) and Dallas’ 4th (85th) from the Kings in exchange for Byron Dafoe and Dimitri Khristich; Dallas’ 3rd (58th) from Colorado for John Slaney; and Chicago’s 4th (74th) for Igor Ulanov.

Let’s take a look at the selections that David Poile and the Washington Capitals made in 1996, and try to determine what they were thinking on draft day and where they went wrong.

RW Alexandre Volchkov 6’1″ 194 – Barrie Colts (OHL)

(1st round, 4th overall – originally Los Angeles’ pick)

C.S.B. Ranking: 2nd, North American skaters

Actually drafted: 3rd N.A. skater taken
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